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Gun powder horns

Article about: Hi, Are these horns from civil war? Are they authentic or replica? Thanks!

  1. #1

    Default Gun powder horns

    Hi,

    Are these horns from civil war? Are they authentic or replica? Thanks!
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  2. #2

    Default Re: Gun powder horns

    They do look old, and may be original, but I do not know too much about them.

    Possibly from an earlier era, and perhaps not military. I'm thinking that by
    the time of the American Civil War, soldiers were using metal
    powder flasks and leather pouches.

    I hope there are some blackpowder guys that can tell you........
    Regards,


    Steve.

  3. #3
    ?

    Default Re: Gun powder horns

    They are anywhere from the early 1800's through the American civil war.. The big one is for the barrel charge and the small one is for the frizen pan on a flintlock weapon. The patina on the horns lead me to believe that they certainly are old. The value for both would be in the $100.00 to $125.00 range.
    Steve

  4. #4

    Default Re: Gun powder horns

    By the time of the Civil War, soldiers on both sides were issued ammunition in ten round packages. The soldier would carry a total of 40 cartridges in a leather cartridge that he carred on his right side. Each round consisted of a paper tube with the bullet at one end and the powder in the other end. The soldier had to bite the tail of the paper tube to open it so that the poweder could be poured into the barrel. The bullet was supposed to be squeezed out of the paper and then rammed home. Loose powder and balls (poweder horns and bullet pouches) may have been used by some militias very early in the war, but were not issued by any state or national arsenals

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