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Help needed to identify flak fragments?

Article about: Those three horizontal lines are definitely not something you see every day; they're far, far too shallow and narrow to have anything to do with the driving bands. I have an 8,8cm Sprgr. 4,5

  1. #41
    Turtle
    ?

    Default Re: Help needed to identify flak fragments?

    I'm not sure these grooves are related to the driving band. There should be feathering under the copper driving band to prevent the band from rotating on the shell. If we are oriented correctly, the groves (in my opinion) run around the shell. Such an arrangement as seen in the pics would easily allow the driving band to rotate. If I recall correctly there were two semi-fixed German shells 152mm and 75mm that might have these bands below the driving band. Again, for common reference, I would say the ogive is above the driving band.

    Just a thought!

    Tom

  2. #42
    Turtle
    ?

    Default Re: Help needed to identify flak fragments?

    Here's a thought! Could it be from a mortar? Maybe we are looking at it from the wrong angle.

    Tom

  3. #43
    ?

    Default Re: Help needed to identify flak fragments?

    What exactly do you mean by 'feathering' Tom? And what's the trouble with the ribs running around the shell- the 6pdr. cross section I posted shows this was an effective design. They must have provided a sufficient extra amount of strategic surface area for friction to work.

    And what about the orientation and nature might suggest a mortar shell? I know the German 8cm, for example, had a series of incised grooves near its top, but that would fit with the way we've been looking at the piece save that it doesn't actually fit with that one because these are raised ribs- did someone else's mortar shells have shellslittle raised ribs that ran other than circumferentially?
    Ohhhhh- pillage then burn...

  4. #44
    Turtle
    ?

    Default Re: Help needed to identify flak fragments?

    Actually, what I am learning from this discussion is that shell production differed significantly by country. I just downloaded an old copy of the American Machinist which shows the manufacturing differences of shells between USA, Britain, France, and Russia. The techniques you are describing seem to be correct and in line with the British method of production. My technical knowledge is strictly from the the USA perspective. So I guess the starting point would be to identify the country of origin. The surest way woud be to have the metal analyzed as each country had different metal standards from what I gather.

    As far as my mortar comment, I was just raising it as a question. We have been focusing on spin-stabilized shells, so the thought occured to me that we might be missing something by not considering fin-stabilized or the larger caliber German mortars. That was all.

    All-in-all, this has been a very interesting and technical discussion so far. Thank you to all.

    Tom

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