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A Question About .303 HXP Ammo

Article about: Hi all. I was wandering around a site that is used by both the public and occasionally by Army, TA and ACF units for training. I noticed quite a few 5.56mm blanks lying around, some 7.62mm b

  1. #1

    Default A Question About .303 HXP Ammo

    Hi all. I was wandering around a site that is used by both the public and occasionally by Army, TA and ACF units for training. I noticed quite a few 5.56mm blanks lying around, some 7.62mm blanks and links from a GPMG but also I counted a couple of .303 cartridges that initially I thought were WW2 but on closer inspection turned out to be blanks marked HXP and dated from the early 1980s.

    I gather that the HXP headstamps meant Greek manufactured rounds and the 1980s date would coincide with use by cadets more than anything else? I am just curious as to why the Government would have purchased Greek made ammo as opposed to issuing British manufactured ammo. Surely there were stocks left over from the days of the NO4 and BREN etc?

    Any comments would be appreciated. Cheers.

  2. #2

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    Even the vast stocks produced during (and for that matter after) WW2 are eventually expended-by the 1980s the .303 weapons had been out of service for 25 years for general use-in Australia, the last Lee Enfields were withdrawn from High School Cadet units in 74/75 as by then ammo had to be imported from India and was considered too expensive to continue doing so.

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    Thanks for that Lithgow. So it was not just Britain importing foreign made ammo then? I guess that for a time it worked out cheaper to import it than produce by then obsolete ammunition.

  4. #4

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    It doesn't even need to be an obsolete calibre, we buy IMI marked 7.65 and 9mm and we know who IMI are. You need TonyE to come along as he has lots of history of the HXP ammo, I've got some of the blanks somewhere but it always seemed a little tight in my rifle.

  5. #5

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    Not only did the cadets use Greek blank made in the early 80's (the last RG made blank was in 1974) They also used Italian (BPD) made drill rounds which were modified from the Italian pattern by having flutes pressed into the case.
    Hangarman

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    Good information guys, thanks. Having done some research on HXP ammo, am I also right in thinking that it is quite sought after by .303 owners due to its reloading qualities?

  7. #7
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    The last .303 inch ball ammunition made was some Mark 7z by Radway Green in 1973. This was soon used and so ball and blank was purchased from the Greek Powder and Ammunition Co. (HXP). The Ball was adopted as "Round .303 inch Ball L1A1" and the blank as "Cartridge Blank .303 inch L10A1".

    It is excellent ammunition and Boxer primed, so as you say is highly sought after by reloaders. I have perhaps 600 cases that I reload.

    The drill rounds were imported from Bombrini Parodi Delfino (BPD) in Italy and had a white tipped bullet envelope with no core. To bring them more into line with British practice the cases were fluted and the flutes painted white. I believe this was done by Conjay Arms Co.

    Regards
    TonyE
    British Military Smallarms and Ammunition
    Collector, Researcher and Pedant
    https://sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/

  8. #8

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    As always Tony, excellent info

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