Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27

A quick reference to .303 Headstamps

Article about: by zwerge Hi John,thanks for the list,I have a question for you.On the HS does not the letter C denote cordite? Because when I shake this round I can hear the powder inside,would this be a b

  1. #11

    Default Re: A quick reference to .303 Headstamps

    Quote by zwerge View Post
    Hi John,thanks for the list,I have a question for you.On the HS does not the letter C denote cordite? Because when I shake this round I can hear the powder inside,would this be a black powder round?
    Zwerge, yes C is for Cordite (pre 1912) and it would rattle as there is a small gap between the cordite and the bullet head (to allow for expansion) and that is a lovely round you have there

    cordite is packed into the round in small strips, there are approx 30 strips that fill the case, and it is still volatile even after 90 years

  2. #12

    Default Re: A quick reference to .303 Headstamps

    Thanks for this John. Great bit of info. We need to get this forums mod to stick it

    Zwerge - Nice snub nose 303 you have there. Very nice

    The cordite tends to be packed very tightly in the 303's and is usually capped off with a cardboard ring between it and the projectile. My experience is that these round rarely 'rattle' when you shake them. One of three things here.....

    1. The round has already been de-acted and the noise you here is muck inside the case.

    2. The age of the round has lead to the cordite shrinking a little bit, creating a gap and hence allowing movement, thus the rattle.

    3. I have come across one manufacturer of 303s who filled the cartridge with cordite pellets, similar to the stuff the Americans used to fill their 'larger' small arms ammo. This often rattles mainly because no packing 'ring' was included in the fill.

    Hope that helps

    Steve T

    PS John mentioned it's volatility, even after being in the ground for 90 years. Totally true. It'll still go off quite nicely if you want it to !

  3. #13
    ?

    Default Re: A quick reference to .303 Headstamps

    Thankyou gentlemen.
    JEDEM DAS SEINE

  4. #14
    ?

    Default Re: A quick reference to .303 Headstamps

    Are the Mark VI rounds common? Terrible picture I know..
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Mark V1-1.jpg 
Views:	1290 
Size:	14.0 KB 
ID:	102499  
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    JEDEM DAS SEINE

  5. #15

    Default Re: A quick reference to .303 Headstamps

    Here's a pic showing cordite and blackpowder .303's.

    Cheers, Ned.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  6. #16

    Default Re: A quick reference to .303 Headstamps

    Quote by zwerge View Post
    Are the Mark VI rounds common? Terrible picture I know..
    They are not "rare" in that sense, but you often see 100 Mk7's for every Mk6. Mark 6's are usually found in the princess Mary tins with the bullet pencil. I have 2 of these and both are Mk 6's.

    There are not many that collect .303, but believe me those that do are always looking for the "Rarest of the rare" and are fairly passionate about it. I shoot .303 and load my own, preferring the HXP Greek rounds to re load, as they are boxter primed

    My best one is an AA Pomerory, filled with nitro glycerine and sawdust, it's an experimental round that never went into production. It was to be used by the RAF for shooting down the old Zep's, but was found to be unstable at high altitude

  7. #17
    ?

    Default Re: A quick reference to .303 Headstamps

    Sorry my friend, but that is simply wrong. Both the Pomeroy PSA Mark I and II went into production and were extensively used by the RFC and (after 1st April 1918) the RAF.

    10,643,000 rounds of Pomeroy were produced up until the end of the war in November 1918.

    As for the "rarest of the rare", keep your eyes open for a .303 ball Mark III or even an Incendiary B mark V!

    Regards
    TonyE
    Last edited by TonyE; 01-09-2012 at 03:50 PM.
    British Military Smallarms and Ammunition
    Collector, Researcher and Pedant
    https://sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/

  8. #18
    ?

    Default Re: A quick reference to .303 Headstamps

    An unusual 303 headstamp... I've done some research on-line but cann't seam to find anything yet. At a gunshow I bought some crusty looking 7mm Mauser for the round nose bullets. Upon closer examination they were all 1894-1896 headstamps of various European mfg. The lot contained two different cartridges. One was a Norma 7mm SP. The other was a round nose .303. I am so far not willing to dis-assemble it. The bullet is silver colored cupra-nickel which has a "three crimp" in the brass neck at the bullet base or possibly in a cannular of the bullet. The headstamp consist of three characters evenly spaced; π (greek pi), C, and what appears to be a 9. It has an un-crimpped large copper colored Berdan primer. Because of the unusual headstamp, I'm guessing possibly an early WW1 Japanese, perhaps pre WW1... They adopted the Hotchkiss in 04-05 but I'm not sure if the Hotchkiss was in .303. I'm not sure they started using .303 until they adopted the Lewis gun about 1914-1916. I don't know when the Japanese went to spitzer bullets... I think all European countries had gone to pointed bullets before WW1. The "three crimp" is why I think it's Jap rather than early Brit. When you shake it, there is slight movement consistent with cordite and not a granular powder. ... Could easily be wrong about any of my gusses... Does anybody have any other guesses?? - or recommendations??---- sirrah

  9. #19

    Default Re: A quick reference to .303 Headstamps

    Hi sirrah and welcome to the forum. I would recommend posting a picture of it to assist in identification.

  10. #20
    ?

    Default Re: A quick reference to .303 Headstamps

    I am afraid that your headstamp is neither odd nor Japanese. It is a British Cordite Mark II ball round.

    If you rotate the headstamp you will see it actually reads "6 C II" with the Roman "II" poorly stamped such that it appears to look like the Pi symbol. It was manufactured at Royal Laboratory, Woolwich using cases made by contractor No.6. It is not known who that was as no list has ever been found of the number codes. The "C" on these cases is sometimes stamped the opposite way round to normal.

    The Imperial Japanese Navy did not introduce home produced 7.7x57R (.303 British) rounds until about 1928 and the army Hotchkiss guns were in 6.5x50SR calibre. I am not sure why you thought the 3 x 120 slit crimp was not British, as this was the standard bullet securement from the Cordite Ball Mark I of 1891 until about 1944 when the bullet cannelure was moved forward and neck coning/crimping was introduced. Japanese made 7.7mm Rimmed also used the 3 x120 crimp simply because they copied the Kynoch made contract ammunition they had purchased in the early 1920s.

    Regards
    TonyE
    British Military Smallarms and Ammunition
    Collector, Researcher and Pedant
    https://sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. A guide to headstamps

    In Ordnance and ammo
    12-02-2017, 11:37 PM
  2. ZB26/30 in .303?

    In World Firearms
    05-24-2010, 05:50 PM
  3. .303 Savage in .303 British

    In Ordnance and ammo
    11-15-2008, 09:19 PM
  4. 07-03-2008, 11:08 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •