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ww2 shooting range

Article about: after years of poking around the place finally took the metal detector over for a planned visit, My father had recommended an area behind the 500 yard range, there's always plenty of bullets

  1. #31
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    I find myself a bit confused,I have always heard and seen a "round" described as a cartridge,here are British labels to show them so described.....Pete.
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    JEDEM DAS SEINE

  2. #32

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    Oh Blimey.

    Have I inadvertently opened a can of worms?

  3. #33

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    A cartridge is the sum total of a bullet, a case, the propellant and a primer. Rounds is a term used to define how many cartridges a gun will hold....Or so I was taught.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  4. #34
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    after a very succesfull weekend of hard work i now have some of the finds displayed and partially cleaned
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    these are the 2 main types of spent cartridge that we found
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    can anyone identify this ltem??
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    ps please don't say 'Chinese carton'

    JUST A WORD OF CAUTION, MANY OF YOU MAY KNOW WHERE THE SITE IS, THE WHOLE AREA IS COVERED IN WW2 ARTIFACTS JUST UNDER THE GROUND, IF OUR DIG SHOWED ANYTHING IT WAS THAT MUCH OF WHAT WE FOUND WAS LIVE, MANY HAD CORDITE INSIDE. IT IS LEGAL TO DETECT AND DIG THERE HOWEVER, I WILL NOT BE RETURNING SIMPLY DUE TO THE RISK INVOLVED WHICH ON REFLECTION WAS GREAT.

  5. #35
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    Interesting thread - thanks for sharing.
    I had hoped for more finds/pics, though I fully understand your reasoning.
    Stay safe also in your future detecting endevours.

  6. #36
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    The smaller cartridge case you show appears to be a 7.62x51 case......Pete.
    JEDEM DAS SEINE

  7. #37
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    Quote by Steve T View Post
    Oh Blimey.

    Have I inadvertently opened a can of worms?
    Indeed you have, young man!

    Prior to the adoption in 1954 of the NATO "L" numbers, British small arms ammo had the nomenclature "Cartridge, Small Arm, xyz, Mark I" or whatever. This applied whether the "cartridge" was a ball round or blank or any other type.

    Once the "L" number system came into force, this all changed and certain subtle differences were introduced.

    One of these was the distinction between bulleted and unbulletted ammunition. Ammunition without a bullet (e.g. blanks) had the nomenclature "Cartridge 7.62mm...." whilst that with a bullet (ball etc. including drill) became "Round 7.62mm....".

    For 7.62mm NATO ammunition, certain authorities have stated that the "L1" slot has been allocated twice in error (grenade cartridge and drill) as has "L14", (Practice ball and blank). In fact the error is theirs as the grenade cartridge is "Cartridge 7.62mm Rifle grenade L1A1" since it has no bullet whilst the drill is "Round 7.62mm Drill L1A1" as it has a bullet. Similarly the blank is "Cartridge 7,62mm Blank L14A1" whilst the practice ball is "Round 7.62mm Training, Short Range, L14A1".

    See, it is all very easy actually!

    Regards
    Tonye
    British Military Smallarms and Ammunition
    Collector, Researcher and Pedant
    https://sites.google.com/site/britmilammo/

  8. #38
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    So,if we are talking about old ammo we can say cartridges,if new ammo we say rounds,so simple......Pete.
    JEDEM DAS SEINE

  9. #39
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    anyone know what the metal gum shield thing is, its light metal and i feel that ive seen it before?? also in the 1st pic you see a small metal strip in front of the rusted chargers....i beleive this to be another charger but for different ammunition, prehaps U.S ?? any help most appreciated

  10. #40

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    Quote by ww2nut View Post
    anyone know what the metal gum shield thing is, its light metal and i feel that ive seen it before??
    "I wondered where I left that....."

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    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

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