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AS in Triangle PanzerKampfAbzeichen

Article about: Hello All, this was yesterdays pickup from down South Wales. It was once owned by a member of the 53rd Welsh Division. I thought it may have been a post war fake but doing a bit of research

  1. #1

    Default AS in Triangle PanzerKampfAbzeichen

    Hello All,
    this was yesterdays pickup from down South Wales.
    It was once owned by a member of the 53rd Welsh Division.
    I thought it may have been a post war fake but doing a bit of research I have come to the conclusion that it could be an AS in triangle type 3?

    I do see a few slight variations unless I have been peering at too many small details.

    I note the wreath on the left hand side of the base is flattened as well as the rock. Apart from these soft moulds it looks good to me with a fair amount of original finish,

    Looking at numerous example I wonder if it was because of this wear in the mould that the type 4 was introduced?

    Any opinions and comments welcomed

    All the best
    Doug



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  3. #2

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    It looks like it may have been a light strike, but other than that it's a typical late war badge by this maker in my opinion, as is the matt silver wash that often appears brush applied.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  4. #3

    Default

    Thank you for your prompt reply Ned.
    I thought I understood the manufacturing process of these late war badges.
    I understand the idea of die struck but I was of the conclusion that the zink badges were die cast, ie the badges had a splodge of molten zink squirted in to them.

    So do the badges come out as a hot blank and are then struck in the normal manner much the same as a die struck badge?..........Bit confused now.
    The badge I have looks to be from a worn die.

    Happy none the less that it is a good badge.

    All the best
    Doug

  5. #4

    Default

    Quote by Saladin View Post
    Thank you for your prompt reply Ned.
    I thought I understood the manufacturing process of these late war badges.
    I understand the idea of die struck but I was of the conclusion that the zink badges were die cast, ie the badges had a splodge of molten zink squirted in to them.

    So do the badges come out as a hot blank and are then struck in the normal manner much the same as a die struck badge?..........Bit confused now.
    The badge I have looks to be from a worn die.

    Happy none the less that it is a good badge.

    All the best
    Doug
    Hi Doug,

    Some zinc badges were die cast, take a look at the Assmann numbered series of GAB's that show ejector marks on the reverse, these were I believe die cast using molten zinc under pressure. However the process I refer to above is that of a strip of zinc sheet that is actually heated to a softened, elastic state and then pressed between two dies, male and female, to produce the badge that is then trimmed before having the hardware crimped in. The quite often large differences in the weight of AS in Triangle PAB's indicates that the zinc sheets used varied in thickness (and also alloy mix quality) over a period of time. I guess that considering the material was heated to a very malleable state would best be described as 'die forged' rather than 'die struck', although the same premise is used in both processes.

    The use of heated zinc alloy sheet for badge production by AS in Triangle is directly referred to by Philippe De Bock on page 375 of his book The German Panzer Assault Badge of World War II.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  6. #5

    Default

    Thanks Ned,
    that was a really comprehensive explanation.
    Yep, I have a few of the Assmann badges and know exactly the 4 ejector marks you are writing about. Hence my incorrect assumption that most other zinc badges would be made this way.
    I hadn't really considered a 3rd option in zinc badge manufacture but it makes logical sense.

    Best regards
    Doug

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