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Need some help translating WWII German POW Postcard

Article about: I purchased this not too long ago. It's a WWII German POW Postcard from Papago Park POW camp in Phoenix, Arizona. The camp was famous for the 'Great Escape' by 25 prisoners. It's really a fa

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    Default Need some help translating WWII German POW Postcard

    I purchased this not too long ago. It's a WWII German POW Postcard from Papago Park POW camp in Phoenix, Arizona. The camp was famous for the 'Great Escape' by 25 prisoners. It's really a fascinating event.

    Anyways, I needed some help to what all the German says in the postcard, front and back.

    All I got so far that his name was Rudolf Mannke, and his nickname was 'Rudi' by the back of the postcard, which is dated February 8th, 1945.

    It was sent to Hamburg-Altona, and was addressed to possibly his girlfriend or friend at the time.



    Any more info, and the translation would be greatly appreciated.





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    Dear Lotti,
    Today at yours 24th birthday my thoughts have swum to you as so many times before and they only wish you the good and a further long and lucky life. For your lovely regards you transmitted to me by ???? [I can't recognize the name] many thanks. With greeting once again, also to your mother and Hanni[?] ,
    Rudi

    With best wishes
    alter musketier
    In memory of my father who was in K-Einsatz, combat engagement, with the RAD in the Alps in 1945, of my grandfather who was with the IR 87 during campaign in France in 1940 and of my grand-uncle who served in the Gardegrenadierregiment Nr. 3 "Königin Elisabeth" and who was killed in action at Craonne, Chemin des Dames in France in 1917

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    An interesting postcard letter. I have always found it saddening that the POW's were kept so long after the war's end. Some for many years. It was if they were being treated as criminals. They were, for the most part, simply soldiers. They knew that their country was in ruins and that their families were in desperate need of them and they had to sit many many miles away and could do nothing. The Winter of 45-46 in Germany was, in particular, harsher than beyond recent memory could recall. I wonder how many people back in the homeland perished or were driven to do terrible acts of desperation. It must have been maddening beyond imagination, the frustration.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

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    Thank you Alter Musketier. It seems to be a very personal letter. I'm glad I purchased this fascinating piece of history.

    Am I correct that it seems to be addressed to his girlfriend at the time?

    Anything on the front of the letter about his rank, etc.?

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    Obergefreiter Rudolph Yahnke. He lists no unit, as he is no longer In a unit, of course, but in a Prison. And, yes-it sounds much like he is writing to his sweetheart "Lotti" back home. "Obergefreiter" is a rank something like a senior corporal. Kind of an upper enlisted rank, but not yet a non-commissioned rank...
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

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    Quote by grimes View Post
    Thank you Alter Musketier.
    Dear grimes,
    with pleasure

    Some additions:
    Miss ("Fräulein") Liselotte Kröger lived in the apartment of ("bei") Gretel Wilkens, road "General Litzmannstraße" No 110 III. This street name was existent only during 1933 - 45 according to Wikipedia. Before 1933 the street was named "Kleine Gärtnerstraße", after war it has been named "Stresemannstraße".


    Quote by Wagriff View Post
    They knew that their country was in ruins and that their families were in desperate need of them and they had to sit many many miles away and could do nothing. The Winter of 45-46 in Germany was, in particular, harsher than beyond recent memory could recall. I wonder how many people back in the homeland perished or were driven to do terrible acts of desperation. It must have been maddening beyond imagination, the frustration.
    That's right, I think about the hardships and dangers too. And there was still the threat of air raids, I reat the last which killed people was at April 14th against Hamburg.

    With best wishes
    alter musketier
    Last edited by Alter Musketier; 02-23-2015 at 10:42 PM.
    In memory of my father who was in K-Einsatz, combat engagement, with the RAD in the Alps in 1945, of my grandfather who was with the IR 87 during campaign in France in 1940 and of my grand-uncle who served in the Gardegrenadierregiment Nr. 3 "Königin Elisabeth" and who was killed in action at Craonne, Chemin des Dames in France in 1917

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    Thank you so much Alter Musketier. Your translating has been very helpful.

    I am currently researching the soldiers POW records at the special collections in Phoenix, so I'll update this thread when I get more info.

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