Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

75 Years Ago Today

Article about: To mark the 75th anniversary of start of the most devastating conflict in world history, a brief article summarizing the events launched on September 1st 1939 containing comments of a surviv

  1. #1

    Default 75 Years Ago Today

    To mark the 75th anniversary of start of the most devastating conflict in world history, a brief article summarizing the events launched on September 1st 1939 containing comments of a surviving witness of those days and her present fears. Please note that this thread is not meant to start a discussion on the current events in Eastern Europe.

    Poland uneasy with Russian aggression on 75th anniversary of outbreak of WWII

    Quote by 75th Anniversary of the Outbreak of WWII View Post
    Poland marks the 75th anniversary of the outbreak of World War II Monday with one eye on Russia, which invaded it during the war and is now throwing its weight around in neighbouring Ukraine.

    From the very first German shells fired at a Polish fort in Gdansk in the early hours of September 1, 1939, to the final days in 1945, Poland suffered some of the worst horrors of the war, chief among them the extermination of most of its Jewish population by the Nazis.

    Nearly six million Poles, or about 17 percent of the population — including around three million Jews — died in the conflict.

    Memories of the era have been bubbling to the surface since Russia seized Ukraine’s Crimea peninsula in March, and a fierce conflict began in the country’s east.

    “To use military force against one’s neighbours, to annex their territory, to prevent them from freely choosing their place in the world — this provides a worrying reminder of the dark chapters of Europe’s 20th-century history,” Polish President Bronislaw Komorowski said in a newspaper opinion piece ahead of the anniversary.

    Polish historian Andrzej Friszke meanwhile recalled the infamous Munich agreement that Britain and France signed with Nazi Germany in 1938, allowing it to annex swathes of Czechoslovakia in a failed bid to avert war.

    “There is an attempt again to sacrifice some (people) to buy an illusion of peace for the rest,” he told AFP.

    - Poland carved up -

    On August 23, 1939, Germany and the Soviet Union secretly agreed to carve up eastern Europe between them by signing the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact.

    Just over a week later, the German battleship Schleswig-Holstein opened fire on the Polish fort of Westerplatte, near the northern city of Gdansk (then called Danzig).

    It is at Westerplatte that Poland will hold official ceremonies on the September 1 anniversary, with Komorowski and his German counterpart Joachim Gauck in attendance.

    One of the first cities bombed by the Nazis was Wielun, near the former German-Polish border. It was destroyed in the very first minutes of the war, with 1,200 of its residents killed in the initial attack.
    “It was a foretaste of how the war would turn out: the bloodiest, most terrifying of all of history’s conflicts,” said Jan Szkudlinski, a historian at the new Museum of World War II in Gdansk.

    “A conflict that, in contrast to the war of 1914-18, claimed many more civilian victims than military lives,” he told AFP.

    Hitler’s attack on Poland led Britain and France to declare war on Nazi Germany.

    On September 17, 1939, the Soviet Union in turn invaded Poland and the Red Army executed thousands of Polish army officers in 1940 in the notorious Katyn massacre.

    In 1941, the Nazis tore up the pact with Moscow and invaded Soviet-occupied eastern Poland.
    Two alliances then battled it out until the end: the Axis powers led by Germany, Italy and Japan and the ultimately victorious Allied forces led by Britain, the Soviet Union and the United States.

    - ‘Shivers up my spine’ –

    Barbara Rybeczko-Tarnowiecka was nine years old and living with her parents in Warsaw in 1939.

    “I still remember the sound of the bombs and the frightening din of the windows all shattering at once,” she told AFP.

    “And I retain the sight of the column of German troops passing before our house and singing at the top of their lungs.”

    She peered at them through the bars of the front gate to her building along with other neighbourhood children. Fast-forward 75 years and Rybeczko-Tarnowiecka is again apprehensive.

    “I am very concerned by what is going on between Russia and Ukraine,” she said.

    “To be honest, I’ve been avoiding the news, because it sends shivers up my spine.”
    Several striking period colour photographs by German photographer Hugo Jaeger taken in the weeks following the end of the 35 day campaign on October 6, 1939. This series of photographs really brings a dimension of realism togive one a sense of what it was actually like to be there. Click on the photos to enlarge:



    Invasion of Poland, 1939: Color Photos From WWII’s First Front | LIFE.com

    Quote by Invasion of Poland, 1939: Color Photos From WWII’s First Front View Post
    On Sept. 1, 1939, one week after Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union signed a non-aggression pact, more than a million German troops—along with 50,000 Slovakian soldiers—invaded Poland. Two weeks later, a half-million Russian troops attacked Poland from the east. After years of vague rumblings, explicit threats and open conjecture about the likelihood of a global conflict—in Europe, the Pacific and beyond—the Second World War had begun.

    The ostensible aim of Germany’s unprovoked assault, as publicly stated by Hitler and other prominent Nazi officials, was the pursuit of lebensraum—that is, territory deemed necessary for the expansion and survival of the Reich. But, of course, Hitler had no intention of ending his aggression at Poland’s borders, and instead was launching a full-blown war against all of Europe. (On Sept. 3, both England and France declared war on Germany—but not on the USSR.)

    The invasion—during which German troops, especially, drew virtually no distinction between civilians and military personnel and routinely attacked unarmed men, women and children—lasted just over a month. Caught between two massive, well-armed powers, the Polish army and its Air Force fought valiantly (contrary to legend, which has the Poles surrendering quickly, with barely a whimper). In the end, Poland’s soldiers and aviators, fighting on two fronts, were simply overwhelmed.

    In the weeks and months after the invasion, a German photographer named Hugo Jaeger traveled extensively throughout the vanquished country, making color pictures of the chaos and destruction that the five-week battle left in its wake. Here, on the 75th anniversary of the start of World War II, LIFE.com presents a series of Jaeger’s pictures from Poland: portraits of a country subjugated not by one enemy, but by several.

    In Jaeger’s photos, meanwhile, we see early, unsettling evidence of the violence, unprecedented in its scope, that would soon be visited upon scores of countries and countless people around the globe, from the streets of London and the forests of Belgium to the North African desert and the sun-scorched islands of the South Pacific.
    Regards,
    Tony
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-1.jpg 
Views:	99 
Size:	118.5 KB 
ID:	734630   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-2.jpg 
Views:	155 
Size:	90.6 KB 
ID:	734631  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-3.jpg 
Views:	58 
Size:	72.4 KB 
ID:	734632   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-6.jpg 
Views:	191 
Size:	37.1 KB 
ID:	734633  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-7.jpg 
Views:	49 
Size:	119.8 KB 
ID:	734634   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-8.jpg 
Views:	46 
Size:	83.4 KB 
ID:	734635  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-9.jpg 
Views:	57 
Size:	111.1 KB 
ID:	734636   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-10.jpg 
Views:	78 
Size:	138.7 KB 
ID:	734637  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-11.jpg 
Views:	68 
Size:	43.2 KB 
ID:	734638   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-12.jpg 
Views:	84 
Size:	80.6 KB 
ID:	734639  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-13.jpg 
Views:	44 
Size:	106.1 KB 
ID:	734640   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-14.jpg 
Views:	67 
Size:	122.1 KB 
ID:	734641  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-15.jpg 
Views:	426 
Size:	61.5 KB 
ID:	734642   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-16.jpg 
Views:	1139 
Size:	106.5 KB 
ID:	734643  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-17.jpg 
Views:	82 
Size:	95.5 KB 
ID:	734644   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-20.jpg 
Views:	119 
Size:	103.7 KB 
ID:	734645  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-25.jpg 
Views:	61 
Size:	103.0 KB 
ID:	734646   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-26.jpg 
Views:	55 
Size:	79.9 KB 
ID:	734647  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-28.jpg 
Views:	53 
Size:	75.3 KB 
ID:	734648   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	140829-nazi-invasion-poland-jaeger-1939-31.jpg 
Views:	64 
Size:	72.2 KB 
ID:	734649  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Polish women clean captured Polish guns in Modlin Fortress, north of Warsaw, 1939.jpg 
Views:	74 
Size:	62.8 KB 
ID:	734650  
    All thoughts and opinions expressed are those of my own and should not be mistaken for medical and/or legal advice.

    "Tomorrow hopes we have learned something from yesterday." - John Wayne

  2. #2

    Default

    Great photos!.....
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  3. #3

    Default

    Great Photos. I have never seen these before.
    John
    I specialize in M1 carbines and Lugers.

  4. #4

    Default

    I forgot to say, that Panzer II looks a little second hand!....
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  5. #5

    Default

    nice foto....thanks

  6. #6
    ?

    Default

    Thank you for posting! Truly striking images . In regards to the post I believe the powers at be are definitely rumbling.

  7. #7

    Default

    “To use military force against one’s neighbours, to annex their territory, to prevent them from freely choosing their place in the world — this provides a worrying reminder of the dark chapters of Europe’s 20th-century history,” Polish President Bronislaw Komorowski said in a newspaper opinion piece ahead of the anniversary.

    Obviously alluding to Germany and the former USSR and WWII.

    However what President Bronislaw Komorowski failed to mention was Poland's own annexation of Czechoslovakian territory September-October 1938, when Poland took advantage of the Sudeten Crisis to demand territory of Zaolzie. Poland used the international crisis with Germany for her own political ends to address long-standing border disputes with its neighbours and issued war threats against Lithuania earlier in March 1938 unless it restored diplomatic relations with Poland "...The establishment of diplomatic relations would mean a de facto renunciation of Lithuanian claims to the region containing its historic capital, Vilnius (known in Polish as Wilno)."
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  8. #8

    Default

    At the Polish Forces War Memorial, NMA - September 2014:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Arboret p-6034.JPG 
Views:	45 
Size:	223.6 KB 
ID:	734950

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Arboret p-5962.jpg 
Views:	44 
Size:	128.8 KB 
ID:	734951

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Arboret-6043.JPG 
Views:	44 
Size:	219.5 KB 
ID:	734952
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  9. #9

    Default

    Thank you for the photos...75 years isn't that long ago, but apparently just long enough for the world to forget in order to have another go ... That war cost my family 3 lives lost and another severely wounded...
    cheers, Glenn

  10. #10
    ?

    Default

    Quote by StefanM View Post
    “To use military force against one’s neighbours, to annex their territory, to prevent them from freely choosing their place in the world — this provides a worrying reminder of the dark chapters of Europe’s 20th-century history,” Polish President Bronislaw Komorowski said in a newspaper opinion piece ahead of the anniversary.

    Obviously alluding to Germany and the former USSR and WWII.

    However what President Bronislaw Komorowski failed to mention was Poland's own annexation of Czechoslovakian territory September-October 1938, when Poland took advantage of the Sudeten Crisis to demand territory of Zaolzie. Poland used the international crisis with Germany for her own political ends to address long-standing border disputes with its neighbours and issued war threats against Lithuania earlier in March 1938 unless it restored diplomatic relations with Poland "...The establishment of diplomatic relations would mean a de facto renunciation of Lithuanian claims to the region containing its historic capital, Vilnius (known in Polish as Wilno)."
    And of course that was good reason for Germany and Russia to Attack Poland Which caused 6 million poles to die and the Russians to murder thousands of Polish officers.
    History seems to repeat itself with the illegal theft of Crimea and the Russian attack on Eastern Ukraine.
    Thousands will die now on both sides. Lebensraum all over again.
    Every body have a nice day.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. 06-29-2014, 10:15 AM
  2. 68 years ago today

    In After the Battle
    08-10-2013, 12:02 PM
  3. 30 years ago today !!

    In Discussions
    05-27-2012, 09:19 PM
  4. 65 years ago today

    In Battlefield history and relics
    07-16-2009, 09:39 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •