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A French guy with a Polish cap and German bajo.

Article about: Doing some research for a French forum friend, regarding Carlos Boyeldieu d'Auvigny who was in 3e Régiment étranger d'infanterie . What is he doing in a Polish uniform with a German bajo? An

  1. #1

    Default A French guy with a Polish cap and German bajo.

    Doing some research for a French forum friend, regarding Carlos Boyeldieu d'Auvigny who was in 3e Régiment étranger d'infanterie .

    What is he doing in a Polish uniform with a German bajo?

    Any help appreciated.

    cheers

    |<ris
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

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    Always looking for Belgian Congo stuff!
    cheers
    |<ris

  2. #2

    Default

    No one ?
    Here is a closer look to the last pic!
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

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    Always looking for Belgian Congo stuff!
    cheers
    |<ris

  3. #3

    Default

    All i can comment is the fact that Polish armed forces in the 1920s were issued with WW1 German bayonets!...
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks for your input!
    But where they issued with a troddel, as the one he is wearing??
    Always looking for Belgian Congo stuff!
    cheers
    |<ris

  5. #5

    Default

    In the early twenties there was a French Plish mission active in Poland during the Polish-Soviet war. France was a very active supporter of poland and sent arms and "advisors". I believe De Gaulle even went there.

    As for small arms in use by the polish in that time: French, German and Russian were all used.

    Cheers,

  6. #6

    Default

    I concur with both previous posters. Equipment in use during Poland's early independence period was a hodgepodge of things of German, Austrian and Russian origin. The reforming Polish Army consisted of men formerly serving in the armies of the three partitioning powers that held Poland captive for 123 years.

    As to the bayonet and portepee, it can’t be entirely ruled out that this was not a portrait studio prop.

    This soldier is wearing the horizon blue French issue uniform of General Haller’s “Blue Army” and evidently served with the Poles. Here’s a brief history pulled off the web:

    What was Haller’s Army? During World War I, Poland did not exist on any “official” map of the world. General Jozef Haller formed a regiment of Poles in France to join the fight in the name of their homeland, with the ultimate goal of Polish independence. They were also known as the Blue Army because of the color of their uniforms.
    Many people have never heard of Haller’s Army or of their contributions during “the Great War”. Because it isn’t well known, many Americans of Polish descent may be very surprised to find out that their ancestors, who had already immigrated to the U.S. prior to 1917, volunteered to fight for the Polish Army in France under Haller. It is estimated that nearly 25,000 Polish men, immigrants to the U.S. and Canada, volunteered and fought in France. Most were recent immigrants who had not yet become American or Canadian citizens. Despite immigrating to a new country, these young men were fiercely proud of their homeland. They willing volunteered to fight for Poland’s democracy and independence. Because of the Partitions of Poland, none had grown up in a free Poland, and Haller’s Army was the first free Polish Army since Napoleon’s time. At the war’s end on November 11, 1918, when Poland officially regained its independence, Haller’s Army continued the fight in the Polish-Soviet War until 1921.
    (https://pastprologue.wordpress.com/2.../hallers-army/)


    Cheers,
    Tony
    All thoughts and opinions expressed are those of my own and should not be mistaken for medical and/or legal advice.

    "Tomorrow hopes we have learned something from yesterday." - John Wayne

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