Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Page 10 of 20 FirstFirst ... 67891011121314 ... LastLast
Results 91 to 100 of 192

Cichociemni (Polish SOE)

Article about: Dear members, I just joined, my name is Gianluca Vernole, I write from Casamassima, a town in Puglia, Italy. My country holds the oldest military cemetery of the 2nd Polish Corps for 5 years

  1. #91

    Default Re: Cichociemni (Polish SOE)

    Hi,

    The "Materialy" Book Number 9, History of the Polish Parachute Badge by Kpt Jan Lorys, published by The Polish Institute and General Sikorski Museum in London in 1993.

    List's the following Information on Parachute Badge Nr:0306.

    Entry Nr:1,143: DROZD JOZEF 0306 KPR.LOT.O.VI.CC

    O.VI = ODDZIAL VI = SPECIAL SECTION C-IN-C, GENERAL STAFF.

    CC = CICHOCIEMNY PRZESZKOLONY i ZAPRZYSIEZONY = "THE SILENT AND UNSEEN" TRAINED AND UNDER OATH.

    I hope that this helps a bit.

    Best wishes

    Andrzejku

  2. #92

    Default Re: Cichociemni (Polish SOE)

    Hi, nuxdrozd

    It was most likely (pun intended ) Operation Most I in April 1944

    Operation Most (Polish for Bridge ) or Operation Wildhorn (as it was called by the British), there were two other such perations -- Most II and Most III.

    The A.K. had fought for almost two days and lost 42 soldiers to keep the Operation Most I landing site secure in the village of Matczyn near Lublin in Poland.

    Those picked up from Poland were:

    General Tatar, Deputy Chief of the AK (code name Tabor; Turski); Lt.- Colonel Ryszard Dorotycz-Malewicz (code name Hancza) a ‘Special Forces’ operations and communications expert; Lieutenant Andrzej Pomian of the Information and Propaganda Bureau of the AK; Zygmunt Berezowski of the Nationalist Party and Stanislaw Oltarzewski of the government Delegatura


    A couple of interesting links:

    http://www.operationwildhorn.com/id6.html

    http://www.polandinexile.com/exile13.htm

    * * * *
    * * * * * * * *
    Operation Most III famously flew back V2 rocket parts, secured by the AK, and of course also on board was Józef Hieronim Retinger (code name Brzoza, Salamander) who had finally recovered enough to travel, having been poisoned by the A.K. in an attempt to kill him and his secret mission in Poland. To keep his identity and mission totally secret on the plane out to Poland Retinger wore a full face-mask but somehwere along the line he was betrayed and his identity had become known to the A.K. from whom some factions plotted to assassinate him.



    Quote by nuxdrozd View Post
    0306 sounds right, and I have cross-checked it in Tucholski's book. Dad's insignia are on my office wall, so I'll re-verify when I go back to the office. My old scanner isn't compatible with Windows 7, so as soon as I have a new one I'll scan in what pics I do have. Has anyone heard a story of an operation, possibly involving a high ranking member of the Polish government being smuggled out of Poland, in which just as the aircraft lifted off, German troops emerged from the woods and killed all the people who had been holding torches to light the airstrip? It's a rare story of my Father's from my childhood and I have the impression my Father was somehow part of it.
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  3. #93
    nuxdrozd
    ?

    Default Re: Cichociemni (Polish SOE)

    Wow! Are there any records identifying the personnel who took part in such missions? If personnel participated in the flight, but didn't jump, would they still not have the combat wreath? That is, was jumping the only way to earn the combat wreath? Gary, if by Flying Officer you mean that he was in the RAF, yes he was. Is there something more to the meaning of Flying Officer?

  4. #94

    Default Re: Cichociemni (Polish SOE)

    hello nuxdrozd

    IMO you should contact both the The Polish Institute Sikorski Museum and the more likely archive The Polish Underground Movement (1939-1945) Study Trust also in London. Dr Krzysztof Stolinski is the chairman and has always been very generous with his time and advice when I have asked for information.
    Studium Polski Podziemnej w Londynie / Polish Underground Movement (1939-1945) Study Trust in London

    As the cichociemni were paratroops of the A.K. rather than of the Polish para brigade SPP-PUMST hold records of the cichociemni but as with all Polish WWII records nothing is that simple hence trying the Sikorski also. Unfortumately the cichociemny association has now been disbanded as there are so few survivors remaining in UK.

    Quote by nuxdrozd View Post
    Wow! Are there any records identifying the personnel who took part in such missions? If personnel participated in the flight, but didn't jump, would they still not have the combat wreath? That is, was jumping the only way to earn the combat wreath? Gary, if by Flying Officer you mean that he was in the RAF, yes he was. Is there something more to the meaning of Flying Officer?
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  5. #95
    ?

    Default Re: Cichociemni (Polish SOE)

    Although listed as a Kpr. (Corporal), ... with the LOT attribute, most probably a cadet officer ...

    As for operational function, .. he might (by one of the stories you told), be part of a "snatch crew" .. (Aircrew aboard aircraft who landed in occupied territory to either dispatch, or retrieve agents.)
    .. Similar to the British "CarpetBaggers" ...

    As mentioned, the Underground study group based in London .. they probably are the best bet.

    Combat Wreath ..
    Most unlikely to be issued for landing in an aircraft behind enemy lines ... only real exceptions were non para trained glider borne troops landing during Market-Garden, ... and their wreaths were issued to a glider form badge rather than a para wing.

    Regards

    Gary J.


    Quote by nuxdrozd View Post
    Wow! Are there any records identifying the personnel who took part in such missions? If personnel participated in the flight, but didn't jump, would they still not have the combat wreath? That is, was jumping the only way to earn the combat wreath? Gary, if by Flying Officer you mean that he was in the RAF, yes he was. Is there something more to the meaning of Flying Officer?

  6. #96
    GFC
    GFC is offline
    ?

    Default Re: Cichociemni (Polish SOE)

    Also Remember, that Army ranks were used by the PAF, so the Corporal Rank may or not be a cadet....
    but with that early a number, he was on of the 1st Cichociemni.....

    The RAF rank - did he serve with the RAF after the war ?

    Sounds like you should inquire about his service record from Northolt - details are posted somewhere with in this Polish

    As Gary has prev posted :

    The 1st is with the MOD records office which can be contacted via the following :
    Address:
    Polish Records
    Royal Navy and Army:
    Polish Correspondence Section
    Room 28B
    RAF Northolt
    West End Road
    Ruislip
    Middlesex
    HA4 6NG

    Email: polishastdisoff@northolt.raf.mod.uk

    Email: polishdisoff@northolt.raf.mod.uk

    The 2nd is through the Sikorski Institute and Museum.

    The Polish Institute and Sikorski Museum, 20 Princes Gate, London SW7 1PT

    Please bare in mind that the Sikorski Institute is a voluntary organisation and thus relies on charitable donations.
    So if you do write to them , please include a self addressed envelope appropriately sized, .. and a minimum donation no matter how small is always welcomed.

    Good Hunting !

    Gary J.

  7. #97
    nuxdrozd
    ?

    Default Re: Cichociemni (Polish SOE)

    Gary, the LOT attribute makes sense because we have a document from just after the war indicating lieutenant's rank. Now I have to go dig out all his papers!

    4thskorpion, I do have some of Dad's training records that I believe I received from PUMST. But, there should be more out there and this site has encouraged me to re-invigorate my search. For example, I don't have any documents identifying any decorations received.

  8. #98
    Miitaryhistorian
    ?

    Default Re: Cichociemni (Polish SOE)

    Quote by 4thskorpion View Post
    I can recommend the recent memoir of cc. Gen. Stefan 'starba' Baluk. It is available in English

    Silent and Unseen. I was a Polish WWII special ops commando
    Pulished by Askon in 2009
    ISBN: 9788374520362

    The book title tries to be too 'hip-and-trendy' but it is a great book by a great hero Stefan Baluk was arrested and spent time in Polish communist prison after the war and could only get work as a taxi driver, despite being a lawyer by training.
    I am currently beginning research for a possible book on the Cicochiemni, and would be very grateful if you could tell me where I could find an English edition of Stefan Baluk's book 'Silent & Unseen' as mentioned by you.

  9. #99

    Default Re: Cichociemni (Polish SOE)

    Quote by Miitaryhistorian View Post
    I am currently beginning research for a possible book on the Cicochiemni, and would be very grateful if you could tell me where I could find an English edition of Stefan Baluk's book 'Silent & Unseen' as mentioned by you.
    In the UK you could try the P.O.S.K. bookshop:
    Polski Ośrodek Społeczno-Kulturalny w Londynie:

    238-246 King Street,
    London W6 0RF


    Tel.: 020 8748 5522

    or buy a copy online from Poland at:

    Silent and Unseen. I was a Polish WWII special ops commando - Baluk Stefan - Historia - Ksi??ki - Ksi?garnia internetowa Naukowa.pl - prawnicza, ekonomiczna - podr?czniki, kodeksy


    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  10. #100
    trevbrown
    ?

    Default Re: Cichociemni (Polish SOE)

    Quote by Lubuska View Post
    What if I can't provide proof that I'm next of kin to T.Lubuska himself, but can provide proof of kinship to Adam and Alfred Lubuska, who had also served in Polish forces in Britain? Tadeusz Lubuska is someone I've heard of from my father Adam, but I don't know how he's related to me or my father. My father died in 2000, when I was too young to be interested in his military past and now I'm trying to find out something more about his family (the Lubuskas), which now counts very few people - if not only me - in the world...
    Do not despair! It is possible that our families are related. Please get back to me.

Page 10 of 20 FirstFirst ... 67891011121314 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Polish WW2 Web resources

    In Polish Armed Forces in the West (Polskie Siły Zbrojne na Zachodzie) 1939-1947
    11-19-2017, 05:10 PM
  2. Polish Regimental Badges WW2

    In Polish Armed Forces in the West (Polskie Siły Zbrojne na Zachodzie) 1939-1947
    11-14-2017, 06:18 AM
  3. Polish Exile helmet Eagles

    In Polish Armed Forces in the West (Polskie Siły Zbrojne na Zachodzie) 1939-1947
    02-28-2017, 04:02 PM
  4. Odd WWI Polish Lancer Badge with design papers

    In Polish Armed Forces - Second Republic (Siły Zbrojne II Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej) 1918-1939
    11-21-2009, 02:31 AM
  5. Researching a Polish Exile Combatant.

    In Polish Armed Forces in the West (Polskie Siły Zbrojne na Zachodzie) 1939-1947
    10-22-2009, 11:10 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •