Page 30 of 43 FirstFirst ... 2026272829303132333440 ... LastLast
Results 291 to 300 of 422

Polish Forced Labour (Zwangsarbeiter/Fremdarbeiter) collection

Article about: by A.J. Zawadzki Hi Stefan, yes, very perceptive of you. Definitely the efforts of a left leaning group. You'll quickly spot the less-than-subtle hammer and scythe imagery on the cover: Atta

  1. #291

    Default My Grandfather

    Hi Guys,



    I hope you can help me out some information about my Gran-dad.

    My mum always told me my Gran-dad was in the cavalry during 1939, took part during the war. She said that for some reason they surrendered (that they were up against a Panzer division?) and was taken as POW and spent the rest of the war working on a farm in Germany as POW. The region where he grew up is now in Belarus. I actually never got any more information out of my mum, however she has his 1939 and victory medals, just these two which were issued in '82. Grandpa passed away in '85 so I was quite young at the time. I always wanted to find out about him.

    After reading this very interesting thread here, I went to the site program straty osobowe and did a search for my gran-dad, and there was the information, the most information I have ever gotten, so thank you to the person who posted this link. I have attached the information I found.

    So I have started piecing the bits together. Bierdziki is village in Belarus, about 100km east of Bialystok, in Polska. It says he was in the 4 D.A.K. would I be correct in saying that this was the 4 Dywizjon Artylerii Konnej, and if so surely he would have taken part in the Bitwa Pod Kockiem, where the Poles were winning the battle but ultimately surrendered on the 5/10/39, his record shows he was taken as prisoner on the 6/10/39 at Wola Gulowska where part of the battle took place. Then taken to Stalag IIIA. I think this is supposed to be Stalag VIIIA Stalag VIII A. It was one of the first ones near Gorlitz, now on the border between Poland & Germany (actually drove through there a few years ago, wish I knew then what I know now).

    Then he was taken to work in Luckenwalde which is just south of Berlin, and his number was 14,264. Unfortunately it doesn't say when he was released but it would have been after Berlin was taken for sure. He resettled in Gdansk after the war where he met my Grandma (who coincidentally was first married her first husband 10 days before the war started, he was in the army at the time, she never saw him again, heartbreaking).

    Any information or confirmation or help would be so much appreciated. I am hoping my dad who will actually be in Suwalki region next year can go to the 3DAK who are stationed there and dig something out!

    I also found some family members from my dad's side who were takes as prisoners to work on farms, one was taken to czech area, one to Austria and one to Germany, another was actually born while parents were being repressed. This part of my family lived in Galicia, near Tarnow at the time, they were farmers, so would have been taken off the land rather than the army. So the Germans did split families up to different areas. Those were hard days.

    Thank You in advance all!
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	siedlar.jpg 
Views:	95 
Size:	205.4 KB 
ID:	561453  

  2. #292

    Default

    Looking at the camp info there in infact a stalag III A in Luckenwalde, so he was there not stalag VIII A. Where could I find some info on the Luckenwalde camp?
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	stalag III.jpg 
Views:	140 
Size:	107.8 KB 
ID:	561455  

  3. #293

    Default

    You could try the Luckenwalde city archives:

    Stadtarchiv (Luckenwalde)
    Markt 10, 14943 Luckenwalde
    Tel.: 03371/52212

    e-Mail: bibliothek@luckenwalde.de
    Last edited by StefanM; 09-02-2013 at 03:01 PM.
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  4. #294

    Default

    Thanks Skorpion, do they have an email address by any chance? I could get my wife to write to them. She speaks some german.

  5. #295

    Default

    Quote by michal79 View Post
    Thanks Skorpion, do they have an email address by any chance? I could get my wife to write to them. She speaks some german.
    You could try:

    e-Mail: bibliothek@luckenwalde.de
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  6. #296

    Default

    A recent new photo. This worker is wearing a non-standard "P" badge for Poles which looks like a button type badge.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Letter_P021.jpg 
Views:	80 
Size:	38.9 KB 
ID:	563429

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Letter_P022.jpg 
Views:	54 
Size:	24.9 KB 
ID:	563428

    The round "P" badge is very similar to the one worn by the Polish female working at the "Wepoba" cardboard factory in Berlin (see below):

    Name:  361561d1340290705t-polish-forced-labour-collection-gemeinschaftslager003.jpg
Views: 371
Size:  28.7 KB

    Name:  361560d1340290703t-polish-forced-labour-collection-gemeinschaftslager004.jpg
Views: 361
Size:  19.2 KB
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  7. #297

    Default

    Thanks Again! I will give it a shot over the weekend!
    Would I be correct about the 4 DAK?

    Michal

  8. #298

    Default

    Quote by michal79 View Post
    Thanks Again! I will give it a shot over the weekend!
    Would I be correct about the 4 DAK?

    Michal
    Yes re 4DAK .... Wishing you every success with the archive
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  9. #299

    Default

    New additions to the photo library:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Letter_P023.jpg 
Views:	74 
Size:	122.4 KB 
ID:	565170
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

  10. #300

    Default

    Dressed in their "Sunday best" clothes, Polish forced labourers celebrate New Years Day 1943 at I. G. Farbenwerk, in Leverkusen Wiesdorf Buschweg, Barrack 3 -1.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Letter_P025_b.jpg 
Views:	329 
Size:	123.8 KB 
ID:	566496

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screen Shot 2013-09-09 at 10.06.02.jpg 
Views:	105 
Size:	53.1 KB 
ID:	566497


    By January 1945 there were 4172 foreign workers including 2712 men and 1460 women working at the Leverkusen facility with Eastern workers (Poles and Ukranians) living in barracks. However Western conscripted workers mainly lived in private homes or rented rooms. The Eastern worker barracks were created from converted inn rooms and stood north-east of the Leverkusen football field. This accommodation in terms of equipment, sanitation and cleanliness was extremely primitive and due to the usually high occupancy rates the spread of disease and infection was often rife.
    I collect, therefore I am.

    Nothing in science can explain how consciousness arose from matter.

Similar Threads

  1. Need Help! Translation of prisoners of war forced labour letter...

    In History and Research Third Reich and WW2
    11-01-2014, 08:36 AM
  2. Polish Forced Labour Uniform

    In Polish Armed Forces - Second Republic (Siły Zbrojne II Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej) 1918-1939
    06-05-2014, 05:07 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •