Results 1 to 10 of 10

Un-numbered Monte Cassino Cross – Verifying Authenticity

Article about: It cannot yet be said for the Monster of Loch Ness: the Yeti of the Himalayas: or here in the forests of British Columbia, the Sasquatch: But the mythical un-numbered Monte Cassino cross doe

  1. #1

    Default Un-numbered Monte Cassino Cross – Verifying Authenticity

    It cannot yet be said for the Monster of Loch Ness:

    Name:  loch ness.jpg
Views: 528
Size:  19.8 KB

    the Yeti of the Himalayas:

    Name:  Yeti.jpg
Views: 552
Size:  42.2 KB

    or here in the forests of British Columbia, the Sasquatch:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	sassy.jpg 
Views:	3181 
Size:	51.6 KB 
ID:	621733

    But the mythical un-numbered Monte Cassino cross does exist after all!!

    A recent auction purchase, based on the photos provided this appeared to be the first genuine un-numbered cross that I’ve yet encountered. But as with many internet auction purchases, it remained a gamble until having undergone a hands-on examination. I was first going to post this recent acquisition onto an existing MCC thread, but reasoned that a separate thread for this study may prove helpful as a general authentication reference for this commonly faked decoration.

    First off, there has been debate as to whether these actually exist. One story supporting their existence suggests that some time after WW2 an order was placed to have crosses struck for awarding to the women who served in the 316th Transport Company as they had been excluded from the initial awards. Aside from being unsubstantiated it’s also somewhat doubtful as the government in exile was holding about 1500 unissued crosses in its vaults. Why would these surplus crosses not have been utilized rather than having new ones struck?

    A more plausible scenario is the brief mention in the Stolarski / Wroński reference that there were“ . . . produced, probably on clear order of the Poles, a certain quantity of crosses without a stamped issue number” - presumably to act as replacements for those lost.

    Let's start with a side by side comparison to a genuine cross. In this case cross #49998, an unissued surplus cross from the tail-end of the production run. (I’ve yet to determine if the final cross produced was 49999, or 50000). The un-numbered cross displays more surface wear than the unissued cross, but otherwise all obverse and reverse face details match up well:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MC comp 014.jpg 
Views:	151 
Size:	177.2 KB 
ID:	621735

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MC comp 020.jpg 
Views:	137 
Size:	144.4 KB 
ID:	621734

    Next, the all-important examination of edge details. Original crosses are designed with a chamfered edge. The die stamping process creates a unique edge profile. All of the copies I have seen to date are produced from a soft alloy cast in molds, and as such the edge details differ markedly:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MC comp 025 a.JPG 
Views:	145 
Size:	196.6 KB 
ID:	621736

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MC comp 027.jpg 
Views:	120 
Size:	102.4 KB 
ID:	621737

    This step alone lends solid support for the crosses authenticity, but let’s press on.

    Genuine crosses have an elliptical intermediate ring that holds the ribbon ring. All the copies I’m familiar with overlook this small detail and instead have a circular ring:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MC comp 009.jpg 
Views:	104 
Size:	114.9 KB 
ID:	621740

    Genuine crosses have a scribe line for placement of the serial numbers. Crosses numbered up to an including 999 have a single scribe line, whereas those 1000 and higher have two scribe lines. Interestingly, this un-numbered cross has a single scribe line, suggesting that it was intended for a three digit serial number under 1000:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	scribe line.jpg 
Views:	111 
Size:	191.6 KB 
ID:	621743

    Width and Height: falls within acceptable tolerances.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	width.jpg 
Views:	77 
Size:	56.9 KB 
ID:	621747

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Height.jpg 
Views:	97 
Size:	69.9 KB 
ID:	621749

    Crosses were subject to manual edge finishing where necessary to remove burrs and other imperfections. Some edge finishing is visible on the upper arm of cross 49999, although this would not have affected the height:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MC comp 013.jpg 
Views:	83 
Size:	196.3 KB 
ID:	621750

    Center Square:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ctr sq.jpg 
Views:	95 
Size:	73.8 KB 
ID:	621753

    Thickness: genuine crosses are stamped in a hard bronze alloy and have a thinner profile than most, but not all, of their cast copy counterparts:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Thickness.jpg 
Views:	92 
Size:	72.1 KB 
ID:	621751

    Ribbon ring gauge: genuine crosses are known to have ribbon rings of different diameter, yet the wire gauge used remains consistent:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ring guage.jpg 
Views:	107 
Size:	99.1 KB 
ID:	621752

    Weight – well within acceptable tolerances at 8/100ths of a gram difference:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	weight.jpg 
Views:	84 
Size:	45.0 KB 
ID:	621754

    For comparison here are the weights of three commonly seen cast copies. One of them is an “honest” collector’s copy marked “R”. This example poorly replicates the surface finish /patina found on original crosses. While worn or cleaned MC crosses lose their dark patina, the articially applied oxidation is another characteritic that gives some of the copies away:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	weight - copy (1).jpg 
Views:	114 
Size:	107.4 KB 
ID:	621757

    This is a fake produced with the intention of deceiving (reverse has manually stamped numbers using the wrong font – see inset). Thick and heavy, even without the ribbon ring it weighs well in excess of a genuine cross. The dark patina is replicated well with these:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	weight - copy.jpg 
Views:	112 
Size:	96.7 KB 
ID:	621756

    And an un-numbered copy with broken arms attesting to being cast from brittle alloy. This will not happen with a real cross. Surface patina is also weak. However, its weight is surprisingly close to genuine crosses:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	weight - copy (2).jpg 
Views:	115 
Size:	104.7 KB 
ID:	621755

    Test time! Here’s an un-numbered cross that was up for auction over the past week. It was described by the seller as genuine. Armed with only the basic knowledge discussed above you should be able to quickly assess the likelihood of authenticity based on the auction photographs alone:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MC copy no number.jpg 
Views:	92 
Size:	93.5 KB 
ID:	621761

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MC copy no number 4.jpg 
Views:	78 
Size:	33.4 KB 
ID:	621758

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MC copy no number 1.jpg 
Views:	119 
Size:	125.2 KB 
ID:	621759

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MC copy no number 3.jpg 
Views:	82 
Size:	36.7 KB 
ID:	621760

    Cheers,
    Tony
    All thoughts and opinions expressed are those of my own and should not be mistaken for medical and/or legal advice.

    "Tomorrow hopes we have learned something from yesterday." - John Wayne

  2. #2

    Default

    Fantastic work Tony!

    Most impressive research that reads better than a book. Who could ask for more?!,,,even a bit o humor. Impeccable presentation and a lovely cross. Congratulations on a spectacular find, I'm glad you have scored so nicely in this young new year

    Marek

  3. #3

    Default

    Hello Marek, glad to know you found this interesting. The cross was actually obtained about a month ago, but thanks to some free time on New Years day I finally had the opportunity to write up the blurb. Thanks for posting your positive and kind comments!

    Cheers,
    Tony
    All thoughts and opinions expressed are those of my own and should not be mistaken for medical and/or legal advice.

    "Tomorrow hopes we have learned something from yesterday." - John Wayne

  4. #4

    Default

    Thank you, Tony for one more page for Polish militaria book.
    Best regards, Alex.

  5. #5

    Default

    Hi Tony

    It's my pleasure to compliment you. It takes lots of work to photograph and present something in the way you have. A lovely award makes it worthwhile also. Happy New Year, Tony!

    Mark

  6. #6

    Default

    Excellent post on how to distinguish an authentic Monte Cassino Cross! Congratulations on your acquisition...

    ....and a belated Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to all!

  7. #7

    Default

    Alex, Marek and Mike, thanks for taking the time and effort in posting your positive and kind comments!

    The study of these artifacts and the gaining and sharing of new knowledge is where the fun is really at in this hobby.

    Cheers,
    Tony
    All thoughts and opinions expressed are those of my own and should not be mistaken for medical and/or legal advice.

    "Tomorrow hopes we have learned something from yesterday." - John Wayne

  8. #8
    ?

    Thumbs up Great job Tony!

    Professional research. I think I saw the listing but was reluctant to bid. The replacement ribbon threw me off.

    Now look at this KRONIKA 1 KOMPANII LEGII OFICERSKIEJ 1941 ROK I was away from my computer...

    Cheers

  9. #9
    ?

    Default

    Quote by A.J. Zawadzki View Post

    Test time! Here’s an un-numbered cross that was up for auction over the past week. It was described by the seller as genuine. Armed with only the basic knowledge discussed above you should be able to quickly assess the likelihood of authenticity based on the auction photographs alone:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	MC copy no number 1.jpg 
Views:	119 
Size:	125.2 KB 
ID:	621759

    Cheers,
    Tony
    This is a very deceptive lost wax cast fake. Have I won any prize? If so I'd like a trip to McDonald's


    Cheers

  10. #10
    ?

    Default Another test


Similar Threads

  1. Monte Cassino cross

    In Polish Armed Forces in the West (Polskie Siły Zbrojne na Zachodzie) 1939-1947
    12-10-2017, 07:50 PM
  2. Monte Cassino Cross

    In Polish Armed Forces in the West (Polskie Siły Zbrojne na Zachodzie) 1939-1947
    10-23-2017, 10:37 PM
  3. Valour Cross and Monte Cassino Cross group

    In Polish Armed Forces in the West (Polskie Siły Zbrojne na Zachodzie) 1939-1947
    11-28-2015, 11:14 PM
  4. Question monte cassino cross

    In Polish Armed Forces in the West (Polskie Siły Zbrojne na Zachodzie) 1939-1947
    02-16-2014, 10:48 PM
  5. Need Help! Monte Cassino Cross

    In Polish Armed Forces in the West (Polskie Siły Zbrojne na Zachodzie) 1939-1947
    12-16-2012, 03:53 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •