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Warsaw Uprising Eagles

Article about: On Friday, we had the 70th anniversary of the Warsaw Rising, the 63-day doomed insurgency against Nazi Germany. During the rising one of the most important symbols and military insignia was

  1. #11

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    Yes, indeed there were two brick works: one in Lamsdorf-Lambinowice and another in Kleuschnitz-Klucznik:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Klucznik has been completly destroyed after the war, but some of those bricks can be found in the ruins of that village too.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I think that those bricks have been used for the building of the military instalations at the Truppenübungsplatz Lamsdorf
    (before the war) and some of them which were left were also used for the building of some of the barracks fundaments at the Stalag.

  2. #12

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    Thank you for posting very interesting subject for me, my father was a POW at Lansdorf (POW No. 105657) following the Warsaw uprising 1944. I always thought the ID tags were card not metal, because that is what I found in my fathers belongings (see pic) below. I presumed they were short of metal or didn't want prisoners to have metal objects, now I wonder if the metal ID tags were surrendered on liberation and the card issued.

    Regards
    Jan

    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #13

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    I recently saw a documentary on UK TV, (can't remember but think it was 'Night Will Fall' (2014) - André Singer) would have to watch it again but think it clearly shows POW camp brickworks and how they used them for buildings offsite as well as on site, they also made quite patterned clay fired tiles for floors in the chambers and other buildings.

  4. #14

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    Quote by Jan Szczygie View Post
    Thank you for posting very interesting subject for me. I always thought the ID tags were card not metal, because that is what I found in my fathers belongings (see pic) below. I presumed they were short of metal or didn't want prisoners to have metal objects, now I wonder if the metal ID tags were surrendered on liberation and the card issued.
    @Jan, You are welcome.
    It's great to see another original cardboard dog tag from Lamsdorf
    The story about those tags is very interesting.
    The Germans gave the Warsaw Uprising POW's in the beginning only cardboard and made of wood dog tags.
    Not only in Lamsdorf but also in Altengrabow, Muhlberg and Oberlangen.
    Why? Because they did not have exact orders how to treat those men and women: as POW's or as "bandits"?
    Here You have some examples from the Warsaw Uprising Museum:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    When the case became clear the cardboard tags were changed into dog tags from zink or steel.
    Here You have a few examples from my collection:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Some Polish POW's were ordered to gave the cardboard/wood tags back in exchange for the matal ones,
    others not (where was the so called german "Ordnung muss sein" at that time?)
    The funny (or not funny) thing about many Warsaw Uprising POW's was the fact that some of them threw their
    dog tags away after the liberation (because they saw those things as a symbol of surrender and slavery) and
    that is the reason why even today some of those tags are to be found in (and around) the area of the former POW camps.

    That's also the reason that Your piece (of family history) has to be considered as a unique one!
    Congratulations on that and thanks for showing it.

    Best regards,

    kindzjal
    Last edited by kindzjal; 05-27-2015 at 11:35 PM.

  5. #15

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    Quote by stefanr View Post
    I recently saw a documentary on UK TV, it clearly shows POW camp brickworks and how they used them for buildings offsite as well as on site, they also made quite patterned clay fired tiles for floors in the chambers and other buildings.
    It would be great if You could share a link with this document with us!

  6. #16

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    Quote by kindzjal View Post
    It would be great if You could share a link with this document with us!
    Trying to find it, think it may have been on BBC, it wasn't Night Will Fall. It was about the mapping of the buildings at two of the biggest camps (archaeology) and they were digging out areas etc.

    This one Treblinka: Inside Hitler's Secret Death Camp | Channel 5

  7. #17

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    Looking at your pictures again the design of the metal dog tags is intriguing! Could this be further evidence of German efficiency, it looks like one half of the tag could be fairly easily snapped off leaving duplicated information with each half. So for instance when a POW died/was killed they left half on the victim and kept the other half for record purposes. Is there any documented information on the reason for this design?

  8. #18

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    Quote by Jan Szczygie View Post
    Looking at your pictures again the design of the metal dog tags is intriguing!
    Why do You think so?
    That was the official design for POW's, but... every POW camp had their own manufactures and ideas on that

    Quote by Jan Szczygie View Post
    Could this be further evidence of German efficiency
    The Germans were not the first and also not the last to make this kind of ID tags.
    In fact they did not care what kind of design there was used.
    They used hundreds differend types of ID tags in POW camps.
    I will show You some examples from my collection which where OFFICIAL handed out to POW's in Lamsdorf only:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    In other camps they used all kinds of materials (and design) for POW tags.

    Quote by Jan Szczygie View Post
    it looks like one half of the tag could be fairly easily snapped off leaving duplicated information with each half. So for instance when a POW died/was killed they left half on the victim and kept the other half for record purposes.
    That is correct.

    Quote by Jan Szczygie View Post
    Is there any documented information on the reason for this design?
    Yes. But it will take a while to find it in my library...

  9. #19

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    Quote by stefanr View Post
    Trying to find it, think it may have been on BBC, it wasn't Night Will Fall. It was about the mapping of the buildings at two of the biggest camps (archaeology) and they were digging out areas etc.

    This one Treblinka: Inside Hitler's Secret Death Camp | Channel 5
    Yes indeed, I have seen this one before, but there was a much more interesting document (I do not remember where I have seen it) about the archaeological investigation of the construction and use of escape tunnels at Stalag Luft III.

    GUARD Archaeology Limited

  10. #20

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    The most popular variation of the Polish eagle made during the Warsaw Uprising:

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    Stamped steel.

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