Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 88

The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

Article about: We've all heard stories of the dangers of battlefield digging. Unexploded ammo, mines, etc.... As a relatively new enthusiast, i would greatly appreciate some advice on detecting and digging

  1. #21

    Question Re: German S-Mines still active?

    I was just wondering if anyone would know that if after all of these years geramn S -35 ( Bouncing Betty) bounding mines would still be active? I know that millions were laid and there must be thousands of them still out there. Anyone run into one in the field?

  2. #22

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    Found two S-Mines so far, one was literally two metres from a Tobruk type emplacement in the Utah Beach area, still had tan paint on it, complete with detonator and everything!

  3. #23
    ?

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    Quote by Ty Revelo View Post
    Hi Military, welcome to the forum. First start by stating where your from and then we can determine the type of ordinance you may encounter. For example if you live here in the U.S. then the dangerous ones of course will be live civil war ordinance. If that is the case stay away from unexploded cannon balls. Call local authorities to deal with it. Anything alive no matter what era your dealing with is not worth life or limb.

    rgds, Ty


    this is only of interest to American Civil War (The Late Unpleasantness) enthusiasts, but years ago when the freeway system was being constructed around Atlanta ,Georgia , USA, the construction passed through the middle of the
    Battle of Atlanta site (south side). All working were warned to leave things alone,
    which was mostly ignored. The stories are many, but one worker collected fused cannonballs ,welded them together for fireplace andirons. they gradually dried out and the resultant explosion killed him and took out most of the house.

    Had a friend in the Atlanta area who would do anything (sneak on Chickamaugwa
    and other National Battlefield Parks in the area) to obtain relics. He had an impressive collection of stuff (it overflowed his garage ). His formula for dealing with fused cannonballs was to core out the fuse whlle everything was wet, then submerge the thing in oil for a period.

    My advice is, don't try this at home.

  4. #24

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    Quote by uboats View Post
    ........ was to core out the fuse whlle everything was wet, then submerge the thing in oil for a period.
    Hmmmmm......might try that on the wife see if it works next time she looks like she's gonna 'blow up'.


  5. #25

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    Quote by uboats View Post


    this is only of interest to American Civil War (The Late Unpleasantness) enthusiasts, but years ago when the freeway system was being constructed around Atlanta ,Georgia , USA, the construction passed through the middle of the
    Battle of Atlanta site (south side). All working were warned to leave things alone,
    which was mostly ignored. The stories are many, but one worker collected fused cannonballs ,welded them together for fireplace andirons. they gradually dried out and the resultant explosion killed him and took out most of the house.

    Had a friend in the Atlanta area who would do anything (sneak on Chickamaugwa
    and other National Battlefield Parks in the area) to obtain relics. He had an impressive collection of stuff (it overflowed his garage ). His formula for dealing with fused cannonballs was to core out the fuse whlle everything was wet, then submerge the thing in oil for a period.

    My advice is, don't try this at home.
    Sure must have been one snazzy fireplace!

  6. #26

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    Right people, why don't we share pictures of what dangerous objectives we have found

    I dug up the remains of a FW-190 in my summer vacation and there were still 20mm rounds in the ground, the 20mm's were safely removed, photografed, then dumped in the sea where they can rust away.`

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN2263.jpg 
Views:	11 
Size:	280.8 KB 
ID:	144869
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN2264.jpg 
Views:	3 
Size:	272.2 KB 
ID:	144870
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSCN2265.jpg 
Views:	6 
Size:	221.4 KB 
ID:	144871
    Best Regards

    Vegard T.
    -------------------------------
    Looking for militaria from 38. Batterie, Heeres Küsten Artillerie Regiment 977, also from 31, 32 and 36. Batterie.

  7. #27

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    If going to dig on sites where fighting took place than you need to have done your homework on as many types of munitions as you can...... after 60 plus years of lying in the ground these things don't tend to look like they did when new. Treat everything with suspicion......... some years ago I took a group of good friends up into the Eifel area on the German - Belgium border. despite me telling them not to touch anything without me taking a look at it first I soon heard one of the group banging something on a tree to clean off the dirt. What he took to be some sort of ' old metal handle ' was in fact a German Rifle Grenade Live........ he probably used up his lifes worth of good luck in that one moment. These were people who had been around WW2 military stuff for years....................
    Kevin

  8. #28

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    Quote by ardenneswoodwalker View Post
    ...... These were people who had been around WW2 military stuff for years.................... Kevin
    Hi Kevin and welcome to the forum.

    I am astounded, truly astounded, that people you say have knowledge of these items would do such a thing. To be honest, they have obviously not paid much attention to the many stories out there regarding injuries and deaths from unexploded ordnance. Or did they just think it happened to 'other people'.

    Whatever the reason, I do hope you advised the person to get another hobby as he obviously doesn't have the common sense to be anywhere near ANYTHING military.

    Keep safe out there and remember, no relic is worth an arm, leg or life.

    Oh and by the way, you don't need to be on an old battlefield to find unexploded ordnance. It can turn up anywhere, at any time, as exemplified by a number of threads in this forum.

    Steve T

  9. #29

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    Hi Steve,
    Thanks for the welcome, looking at some of the names here I think I know quite a few of the forum members and they will know me.....

    Unfortunately like many collectors he had no real expectation of what something having being in the ground for 60 plus yrs would look like....... I recognised it for what it was, but by then it had the crud knocked off it.......
    he learnt a lesson that day and we still rib him about it.

    What does amaze me are the people who come to this site and others asking what the rusty lump of metal they either found or bought at some flea market might be.....
    If you don't know for certain that it can't do you serious harm, why pick it up and take it home ?

    Kevin

  10. #30

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    Quote by ardenneswoodwalker View Post
    What does amaze me are the people who come to this site and others asking what the rusty lump of metal they either found or bought at some flea market might be.....
    If you don't know for certain that it can't do you serious harm, why pick it up and take it home ?

    Kevin
    Indeed Kevin, so very true. I have lost track of the amount of times people join the forum to get something ID'd then, after we've all yelled at them to get what ever it is OUT THE DAMN HOUSE, they post a thank you and we never see them again. I often wonder if they took the advice or were simply blown to smithereens.

    After many years of digging relics I have a good knowledge of the way things can change when in the ground, but even I can get very nearly caught out by making assumptions !! I once came across 3/4 of a 20mm cannon projectile on an old airbase, the cavity inside clearly visible and empty. The outside was one big block of rust and I decided there was no percussion tip in place. I was just about to put it in my bag when I stopped and looked inside again, tilting it so I could see to the end. There, plain as day was the little gain and the shine of brass. The rust had leeched along the entire length of the projectile and covered the tip. The little bugger could've had a chunk out of my thigh !

    Anyway I digress.

    Let this be a lesson to anyone who reads this who 'dabbles' in relic hunting or has just started. I know we've said it before but we'll say it again.

    If you are in any doubt AT ALL about what a relic is, or whether or not it is live, mark the location, call EOD and leave WELL alone. If you get something from a market or house clearance that you discover may well be live, get it down the bottom of the garden and call EOD.

    Steve T

Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Digging and detecting in France

    In Search technology and metal detecting
    07-09-2013, 10:38 AM
  2. Russians digging near Leningrad

    In Battlefield history and relics
    02-08-2010, 07:49 PM
  3. battlefield relics collection

    In Battlefield history and relics
    10-19-2009, 06:16 PM
  4. Your digging equipment

    In Battlefield history and relics
    09-09-2009, 03:20 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •