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The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

Article about: We've all heard stories of the dangers of battlefield digging. Unexploded ammo, mines, etc.... As a relatively new enthusiast, i would greatly appreciate some advice on detecting and digging

  1. #51
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    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    I was working in a Ops room for the Olympics last year and UXB's, Grenades, Bombs were being reported at a rate of 2-3 a day across the UK rising to 4-5 on the weekend.

  2. #52

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    My only question is if your not suppose to touch or remove the shells how come i have seen so many photos on here of peoples collections where they have unexploded ordinance (usually mortar shells)? do they defuse them or simply leave them ready to explode in their displays? If they do defuse them how? I've just always been curious

  3. #53
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    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    I would say that the shells in good condition, meaning not dug up have been deactivated one way or another by people knowing what they are doing. Not something i will recommend the untrained to do The shells and grenades we dig up is best left alone. At times we find some without the fuses for whatever reason. Some people take dug up shells apart anyway and some blown up by them. Explosives and more importantly detonators, can get unstable over the decades.

    Regards, Lars

  4. #54

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    ONly someone looking to get a Darwin award would attempt to deact a ground dug item.

  5. #55

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    Alright well what would your policy on ground dug items say mortars that were found inside a box ?

  6. #56

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    Quote by crites1234 View Post
    Alright well what would your policy on ground dug items say mortars that were found inside a box ?
    You're just gonna die standing next to a rusty old box.....
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  7. #57
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    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    Over here they DO NOT deactivate them. They simply remove and blast them in a safe place. If it cannot be removed, they secure the area and blast it on the spot
    Regards

    Matt

  8. #58
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    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    It of course depends on how dear you hold life. We did not mess around with any of these shells. However i have seen people do it. I just don't really understand why. Thing is you never know if the detonator cap is eroded and the charge have swollen up(around the charge) so to speak. If this is the case, turn the fuse head and the thing blows.

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    Regards, Lars

  9. #59
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    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    The majority of munitions reported to the EOD in UK were souvenirs or ex Home Guard/stay at home stocks. Also some have been found on old Military Training areas or ranges. Though the most serious incident reported was a bomb washed up on a crowded beach in high summer with kids playing with the 'long metal tube'.

    Paul

  10. #60

    Default Re: The Dangers of Battlefield Digging

    All UXO should be dealt with by trained EOD operators, it is there call as to how they deal with it. Most of the training a British operator will go through is on his decision making process. The only time a item a UXO would be rendered safe is if the safety of the area is at risk from a high order. Obviously you can find what we call PUCAs, pick up and carry away, these are assesed to be safe to remove from the area and dispose of at another location or as part of a larger dem. I can't stress enough about how important it is not to pick up any item of UXO unless you know it's safe, and by that I mean, certification or training. Besides if you do find something you can ask the operator if you can press the button to dem it.

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