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would like information on this SS dagger, thanks,

Article about: A quick bit of advise, though.....daggers like these really should Not be taken apart frequently and great care must be taken when re-assembling them again. The main bit of danger is from th

  1. #11

    Default re: would like information on this SS dagger, thanks,

    A quick bit of advise, though.....daggers like these really should Not be taken apart frequently and great care must be taken when re-assembling them again. The main bit of danger is from the nut on the top being tightened down too tightly and causing the wood grip to crack(which it looks like it already has from earlier). Always leave the nut finger tight and even then, on the looser side. When the weather turns humid, the wood swells just enough to crack if it is being tightly clamped down with the nut. It's a nice piece and has considerable value. It would be a shame to have the grip wood deteriorate any further!
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

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  3. #12

    Default re: would like information on this SS dagger, thanks,

    Sound advice which I would echo.

    Cheers, Ade.
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  4. #13

    Default re: would like information on this SS dagger, thanks,

    They are a basic design created in 1917 at the direction of the US Department of War Director of Munitions. There was no military designation for them in WWI, but in WWII they were designated Binoculars, M3. Bausch & Lomb were the primary contractors in both wars, but the type was manufactured by several companies. They were sold to the British in both wars. The basic source of information on these binoculars is, America's Munitions, 1917-18: Report of Benedict Crowell, Washington: GPO, 1919., pp.577-79. Current value is somewhere around $150 depending on condition and markings. But in the end, it comes down to what the buyer will pay. Dwight

  5. #14

    Default re: would like information on this SS dagger, thanks,

    dwight,,
    thanks for all that information on the bino's,

  6. #15

    Default re: would like information on this SS dagger, thanks,

    Quote by Wagriff View Post
    A quick bit of advise, though.....daggers like these really should Not be taken apart frequently and great care must be taken when re-assembling them again. The main bit of danger is from the nut on the top being tightened down too tightly and causing the wood grip to crack(which it looks like it already has from earlier). Always leave the nut finger tight and even then, on the looser side. When the weather turns humid, the wood swells just enough to crack if it is being tightly clamped down with the nut. It's a nice piece and has considerable value. It would be a shame to have the grip wood deteriorate any further!
    yes, the wood has a crack at the top, when this happened i dont know, i only took it apart to see if there were number's or marking's anywhere on it for identification purpose's, i've no need to dismantle it again, and the nut is loose, so hopefully no more damage will occur,, thanks,

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