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Pic of Klaus BARBIE

Article about: Hi, here with a pic of SS "Sturmführer" Klaus Barbie . Please have a look on his arm eagle... odd.... a bad fake IMO... lol has someone already seen something like that ? info woul

  1. #31

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    Also of interest (German language):

    https://www.das-parlament.de/2012/48...1757810/320836

    (Basically, although the person in the photograph bears a resemblence to Barbie, the military historians of the Bundeswehr's MGFA at Potsdam cannot positively identify him, either, offering only the observation that it is an army NCO photographed at an unknown location at some time between 1939 and 1945.)

    The photograph has been discussed at the AHF as well:

    Klaus Barbie - Axis History Forum

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  3. #32

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    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	912521Here is an image that does or does not diverge from the norm, and exceeds my expertise.

    Maybe one of you can analyze it...
    damit, basta.

  4. #33

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    I am not especially a cultist of Sepp Dietrich and late war pictures are not my focus of analysis.
    damit, basta.

  5. #34

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    Quote by HPL2008 View Post
    Also of interest (German language):

    https://www.das-parlament.de/2012/48...1757810/320836

    (Basically, although the person in the photograph bears a resemblence to Barbie, the military historians of the Bundeswehr's MGFA at Potsdam cannot positively identify him, either, offering only the observation that it is an army NCO photographed at an unknown location at some time between 1939 and 1945.)

    The photograph has been discussed at the AHF as well:

    Klaus Barbie - Axis History Forum
    The solution to this, it seems to me, is his SS personnel file, which would have had pictures of him.

    Has no one found his SS personnel file from the former Berlin Document Center which is now in the Bundesarchiv?

    The re use of improperly attributed and wrongly dated photographs is a growing trend, actually.

    - - ------- - -

    as is the wanton use of my pictures for reuse in very odd places, but that is life in the 21st century.
    damit, basta.

  6. #35

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    Andreas, Das Parlament is an excellent source and thanks for using it here.
    damit, basta.

  7. #36

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    Quote by Friedrich-Berthold View Post
    Here is an image that does or does not diverge from the norm, and exceeds my expertise.

    Maybe one of you can analyze it...
    I will give it a try....

    This is a very late-war image; if memory serves, it was taken during the Ardennes offensive.

    The eagle on Sepp Dietrich's cap is non-regulation: Originally, the Einheitsfeldmütze was worn with a cloth death's head on the front and a cloth national insigne (eagle) on the flap on the left side. This was later replaced by a one-piece trapezoidal badge worn on the front, which featured both the eagle and the death's head in reduced size. Dietrich is wearing what appears to be a sleeve eagle, very likely in his trademark gold embroidery.
    (Of course, period photographic evidence shows that many non-regulation insignia were worn on this cap - for example the metal cap eagles and/or death's heads as worn on the service cap, death's heads cut from Totenkopf collar patches, Army-pattern tankers's skulls etc. Besides, Dietrich never cared too much about regulations anyway, although of course, he was not the only general officer who liberally applied individual touches to his garb.)
    His greatcoat is worn with the top buttons undone (to which he was entitled both as a general officer and a Ritterkreuzträger) exposing the silver-grey facings worn by all officers ranked Oberführer and above.

    The Standartenoberjunker on the right is wearing a wartime period second-model Tarnschlupfjacke [camouflage smock] featuring cloth loops in the shoulder area and on the upper sleeves, into which camouflage material such as foliage or long grass could be placed. Underneath this is an enlisted-grade field blouse.
    He is wearing officers' collar patch piping and -cap cords, to which this rank was entitled.
    His cap is a service cap from which the wire ring in the cap top and the frontal stiffener have been removed, making it more suitable for field use and giving it a more rugged appearance. This was an expressely forbidden, but also a rather common practice, especially after the old-model "crusher" cap was no longer available.

    The officer in the background is wearing said older-model field cap and a greatcoat with an attached fur collar and reinforced shoulders. Many variants of winter coats with unusual features (both tailor-made specimens or modified issue pieces) were worn.

    That's all I can think of for now.

  8. #37

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    Thank you, dear friend, perfect as ever. The eClick image for larger version. 

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ID:	912665Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	912666agle is looking the wrong way, is it not?
    damit, basta.

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