Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

dry rot treatment

Article about: My nice lufty liner was afflicted with the dry rot. I read that 2% hydroxypropylcellulose in isopropanol is used on leather books to prevent further deterioration. So I tried it on my liner

  1. #1
    ?

    Default dry rot treatment

    My nice lufty liner was afflicted with the dry rot. I read that 2% hydroxypropylcellulose in isopropanol is used on leather books to prevent further deterioration. So I tried it on my liner and it did not discolor it. I know purists are averse to messing with a helmet, but this stuff seems to work ok and hopefully save the liner from total disintegration.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0711.jpg 
Views:	276 
Size:	224.0 KB 
ID:	476680   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0714.jpg 
Views:	445 
Size:	226.7 KB 
ID:	476660  


  2. # ADS
    Circuit advertisement
    Join Date
    Always
    Location
    Advertising world
    P
    Many
     

  3. #2

    Default Re: dry rot treatment

    A helmet stored in a normal environment will stop any deterioration process (or slow it immensely so that they will remain good for another collector after you're long gone). So I would never recommend any 'saving' actions. Does the leather smell of the product now ?
    PS Talking above ground finds.

  4. #3

    Default Re: dry rot treatment

    I'd assume to just not do anything to my helmet liners for sake of originality. You can do as you please with your helmets but it may affect the collectibility of them in the future.

  5. #4

    Default Re: dry rot treatment

    Collectors do not like helmets that have been played in anyway.

    chris

  6. #5
    ?

    Default Re: dry rot treatment

    I understand that once dry rot starts the leather will continue to disintegrate no matter how it is stored (although it can be slowed down by putting it in a freezer). So given the choice of a helmet with a liner that will eventually just fall apart and turn to dust or a slightly messed-with intact liner....I choose the latter.

  7. #6
    4md
    4md is offline
    ?

    Default Re: dry rot treatment

    I was wondering has it deteriorated since you have owned it, prompting you to do somthing about it.
    my liners and helmets seem to have stayed the same since i got them and stored them in a better enviroment.

    Paul

  8. #7

    Default Re: dry rot treatment

    Quote by Pablo View Post
    I understand that once dry rot starts the leather will continue to disintegrate no matter how it is stored (although it can be slowed down by putting it in a freezer). So given the choice of a helmet with a liner that will eventually just fall apart and turn to dust or a slightly messed-with intact liner....I choose the latter.
    It seems more to me that you think it had dry rot and secondly you used an experimental product on it.
    Now I'm still waiting for your reply , does the liner smell of the product you used ?

    Like the poster before me I have not seen any of my leather deteriorate , I compare with my old old pictures and the pliability at regular intervals.

  9. #8
    ?

    Default Re: dry rot treatment

    Of course the leather had a different odor right after I used the product, but would expect it to fade over time. The leather was powdery and extremely fragile.....any handling caused a chunk of leather to fall off. After reading about the consequences of dry rot, I decided to do something before it continued to fall apart (I guess I could have just quit handling it). I read about this product being used for years to arrest dry rot on rare leather-bound library books, so the product is not experimental. Now I can move the helmet around w/o leaving a trail of powder and leather pieces.

  10. #9

    Default Re: dry rot treatment

    I'd rather save the liner than lose it!...
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  11. #10

    Default Re: dry rot treatment

    Just a thought as i have had this same problem with a couple of vertical hangers and 3pc hangers on my daggers. There is a product called Neets foot oil as it is naturally made from the shins of animals which returns the pliability of the leather to its original State. Here is the link and a small bio and photo below
    Neatsfoot oil - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia .....My opinion is to use this at your own discretion and it is not meant to detract from this thread or create any controversary on our collectibles as we all feel we want to make the best decisions for the preservation of these fine items. In the case of the helmet liner it may darken the leather. Read the link thoroughly. Regards Larry

    Characteristics

    Fat from warm-blooded animals normally has a high melting point, becoming hard when cool – but neatsfoot oil remains liquid at room temperature. This is because the relatively slender legs and feet of animals such as cattle are adapted to tolerate and maintain much lower temperatures than those of the body core, using countercurrent heat exchange in the legs between warm arterial and cooler venous blood – other body fat would become stiff at these temperatures. This characteristic of neatsfoot oil allows it to soak easily into leather.

    Modern neatsfoot oil is still made from cattle-based products, but now, while retaining its historic name, usually is made mostly from lard,[1] which is sold as pure neatsfoot oil. This formulation does darken leather.[2] If mineral oil or other petroleum-based material is added, the product may be called "neatsfoot oil compound". Some brands have also been shown to be adulterated with rapeseed oil, soya oil, and other oils.[3] The addition of mineral oils may lead to more rapid decay of non-synthetic stitching or speed breakdown of the leather itself.[2][4][5]

    Uses

    Neatsfoot oil is used on a number of leather products, although it has been replaced by synthetic products for certain applications. Items such as baseball gloves, saddles, horse harnesses and other horse tack can be softened and conditioned with neatsfoot oil.

    If used on important historical objects, neatsfoot oil (like other leather dressings) can oxidize with time and contribute to embrittling.[6] It also may leave an oily residue that can attract dust. On newer leather, it may cause darkening (even after a single application), thus may not be a desirable product to use when the maintenance of a lighter shade is desired. Neatsfoot oil is more useful for routine use on working equipment.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	121kb3.JPG 
Views:	83 
Size:	121.7 KB 
ID:	477080  
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    It is not the size of a Collection in History that matters......Its the size of your Passion for it!! - Larry C

    One never knows what tree roots push to the surface of what laid buried before the tree was planted - Larry C

    “The farther back you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.” - Winston Churchill

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •