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Ring question

Article about: Can anyone say if they have seen anything similar. I believe this belonged to a WWII German soldier. My apology for the location of the post. I couldn't find anything similar.

  1. #11

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    Well, I guess cleaning, resizing and subsequent polishing
    makes it look new, which doesn't help it any. A shot of
    the cross and enamel within might provide a clue, but
    if it truly is 'old', it's likely a WWI patriotic piece.


    '925' is also seen on most silver from Mexico as well,
    so it doesn't mean much.........
    Regards,


    Steve.

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  3. #12

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    835 and 835S was the Standard silver mark for most of the 1st half of the 20th century Europe... Somehow, I rather doubt that a campy patriotic ring would have been produced in a higher grade silver than most all of your silver jewelry of the day.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  4. #13

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    Wagriff there is a reason for the .925. It is considered the sterling silver minimum standard. It doesn't matter one way or the other but to say it wasn't seen in Germany until after WWII just is not correct at all.

  5. #14

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    Well, I'm not going to belabor the point. This will be my last post on this piece. Of course, .925 is Sterling silver-as can also be .950 as well. And, yes-.925 did exist in pre-1945 Germany, but the Standard silver for jewelry of the time was .835. It was marked, as said, .835 or .835S. I know that it doesn't match up with your ring, but you can make what you will of it. The ring Design is simply a WWI era patriotic Design-this design had pretty much ceased before the advent of WWII. They were intended to be worn by civilians and anyone else who wanted to show their support for the war effort. I have never seen a trinket ring-for such as these are-marked and made in a Very high grade silver as opposed to most of all the other silver jewelry with a lower silver content. It just wouldn't make sense. They were never intended to be heirloom pieces or fine jewelry. But, having said that, as I said, make of it what you will. Enjoy your ring for what it is and if you care to believe it's something that it's not-then by all means enjoy it nonetheless.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  6. #15

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    Wagriff,

    My apology if my response came out wrong. I have been collecting for many years but mostly firearms. I don't claim to be an expert and was simply pointing out what a search produced for me. I'm not declaring the ring to be anything. At best it's a $50 ring, at worst $5 worth of silver. I simply wanted to see what input I could garner. I will label the ring as a possible. I also don't think I can rule out it's authenticity just like I can't confirm it. Damn good story though. ROFLMAO


    Max

  7. #16
    ?

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    From the style a typical WWI period german patriotic ring.

    But from the whole appearance and the bad quality its made i would think its a modern fake.
    .925 silver was possible at all times in germany, but very very uncommon in these times. I have never seen period mass produced
    rings with this content mark.

  8. #17

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    Odal actually I would say it was made from a complex mold. The ring such as the one in your avatar is a inexpensive mold cast. All of these start out as wax in plaster. The more complex the openings and casting the more difficult to make. Here is a ring I made when my father bought his first jewelry store and I was playing with the process in 1975.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #18

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    Gypsies love saddle rings over here.....Owning one is the epitome of good taste and (in)breeding in caravan dwelling communities....
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  10. #19

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    Quote by big ned View Post
    Gypsies love saddle rings over here.....Owning one is the epitome of good taste and (in)breeding in caravan dwelling communities....
    Really?

  11. #20
    ?

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    Quote by Logictox View Post
    Odal actually I would say it was made from a complex mold.....
    Yes, i agree. In my opinion too the first ring in this thread is a lost wax cast item

    Quote by Logictox View Post
    the ring such as the one in your avatar is a inexpensive mold cast....
    In this case i have to disagree.
    The avatar-ring has all signs of a traditinal die struck one and no signs of casting.
    I still have some rings and some experienses in rings and manufacturing them.

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