Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 13 of 13

Unknown WW2 Waistcoat

Article about: There is a very similar looking garment on page 127 of the excellent 'The World War 11 Tommy' and it is worn by a Royal Artillery gunner and is described as 'Coat, Duffel'. The fabric looks

  1. #11

    Default Re: Unknown WW2 Waistcoat

    There is a very similar looking garment on page 127 of the excellent 'The World War 11 Tommy' and it is worn by a Royal Artillery gunner and is described as 'Coat, Duffel'. The fabric looks just the same but it has arms.

    Name:  Duffle_Caot_1.jpg
Views: 259
Size:  95.0 KB

    'Intended for use in only the coldest environments, this garment, although less restrictive than the old Tropal coat, still caused the wearer to overheat if it was worn during any strenuous activity. It was well suited to sedentary tasks or periods of inactivity

    I would hazard that your waistcoat is not made of felt but of Jersey wool and was intended for use in cold environments by drivers, sentries, artillery and possibly for freezing cold desert nights! Anyway, just a theory.

    Cheers,

    Ian.

  2. #12

    Default Re: Unknown WW2 Waistcoat

    Quote by canti44 View Post
    There is a very similar looking garment on page 127 of the excellent 'The World War 11 Tommy' and it is worn by a Royal Artillery gunner and is described as 'Coat, Duffel'. The fabric looks just the same but it has arms.

    Name:  Duffle_Caot_1.jpg
Views: 259
Size:  95.0 KB

    'Intended for use in only the coldest environments, this garment, although less restrictive than the old Tropal coat, still caused the wearer to overheat if it was worn during any strenuous activity. It was well suited to sedentary tasks or periods of inactivity

    I would hazard that your waistcoat is not made of felt but of Jersey wool and was intended for use in cold environments by drivers, sentries, artillery and possibly for freezing cold desert nights! Anyway, just a theory.

    Cheers,

    Ian.
    Hi Ian,

    I think that it is actually a felt type waistcoat/jerkin as issued to munitions workers. If it is, it will not have any metal fasteners, studs or buttons as these were a potential explosion hazard. In fact, clothing in the factories was issued for wear only there, and the workers had to change from their own clothes into the ones provided. You can imagine what would happen if a worker was to clock on in their own clothes and forget say, a loose match or box of matches or other potential spark producing/ inflammable/ conductive item in their pockets. They would change back into their own clobber when the shift finished.

    Generally speaking, the British army combatted the cold conditions endured by troops with the issue of the Jerkin, Leather, No.2 that was originally used in the first war and continued on until the 50's or 60's at least. I remember my first job on leaving school was at a Trout fishery where the gaffer, an ex wartime Royal Marine, wore one everyday from September through until May every single day, it was his 'uniform'!

    Here's a link to that particular piece of kit.

    http://www.warrelics.eu/forum/unifor...-jerkin-12313/

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  3. #13

    Default Re: Unknown WW2 Waistcoat

    Hey Ned,

    it was a crazy idea...and it didn't work!

    You're quite right mate and of course felt is made of wool anyway. The white duffle of the 'Ww2 Tommy' book caught my attention because it's so bloomin' white and that's what made me link it the woolen jerkin above. I do have a leather jerkin of my own at home but unfortunately the date stamp has long worn away. It does have a beautiful patina about it though and two of the buttons have been replaced with what looks like 1940'-50's women's coat buttons which I think is a nice touch.

    I remember in childhood too the leather jerkin was 'de-rigeur' for bin-men and the fella's who pushed the hand-carts singing 'any old iron' down the back entries.

    Cheers,

    Ian.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Need Help! Unknown Hat

    In Bundeswehr forum
    07-16-2012, 02:27 PM
  2. 06-18-2011, 02:10 PM
  3. 02-13-2011, 01:31 AM
  4. The Unknown EK2 - #2.

    In 1939 Eisernes Kreuz forum
    10-02-2010, 10:56 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •