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What is this!!!

Article about: Sorry to dissagree - rainbow thread embroidery and embellishment was not uncommon in US Navy uniforms. I have had a number of these in the past with different amounts and styles of embroider

  1. #11

    Default Re: What is this!!!

    i cant tell about a value loss but i guess better like this as nothing

  2. #12

    Default Re: What is this!!!

    Folks, There is a long history apparently dating back to before the civil war of uniforms being embroidered outside of regulations. They were nicknamed "Glad rags" because they would be worn typically on leave. Regulations stated uniforms had to be "stitched" to prevent fraying and some Navy men took artistic license with the regulation. Cuffs were often embroidered in the inside too known as "Liberty cuffs" because they were worn embroidery side out on leave. Apparently, in ports of call around the globe such as Hong Kong this kind of service was offered by the locals pre and post world war II. Without knowing the origin of the jacket I would say this is not a detraction sewn on by a hippy if that was the general consensus. NH

  3. #13

    Default Re: What is this!!!

    I don't think it detracts from the value of the uniform. The embelishments are valuable in their own right and tell a social history story of how service uniforms have been adapted and worn as fashion through the decades. I remember in 1980's Britain how early dress tunics were worn to night clubs and even war time field service caps were worn as fashionable hats with CND badges pinned on them.

  4. #14

    Default Re: What is this!!!

    Hi Neil, I agree with you 100% about embroidery on uniforms, but for the life of me, I just can't see a sailor allowing those feminine colors being used on his uniform. If his fellow shipmates saw him with that on the inside of his uniform, he'd be walking the plank. There was no political correctness in those days.

    Jay

  5. #15

    Default Re: What is this!!!

    Thanks for the help everyone! - Nick K

  6. #16
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    Default Re: What is this!!!

    I have to agree with NH here, this is not embroidery but cord sewn down and its been coloured at a later stage. If you look closely you will see that this a representation of a chinese junk, and i wouldnt put it past a bored sailor to either do it himself or have it done in some port, look at the stitching its very precise and not machine done, as for being taunted by his ship mates, i daresay others had it done, and seeing it was inside , who would see it but the owner

  7. #17

    Default Re: What is this!!!

    This reminds me of the 'Party jackets' of the Vietnam war, except that they were
    more heavily embroidered with maps of the country and city names,
    as well as coloured dragons.........
    Regards,


    Steve.

  8. #18

    Default Re: What is this!!!

    I asked my dad who served in the navy and he said if it was one of those jackets girls decorated it would be covered in flowers and hearts or a band like Led Zepplin not a sail boat. He thinks it was either made on by the soldier or by the local people but thats his opinion. - Nick K

  9. #19
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    Default Re: What is this!!!

    Quote by helldunkle View Post
    I don't think it detracts from the value of the uniform. The embelishments are valuable in their own right and tell a social history story of how service uniforms have been adapted and worn as fashion through the decades. I remember in 1980's Britain how early dress tunics were worn to night clubs and even war time field service caps were worn as fashionable hats with CND badges pinned on them.
    There was a big thing with wearing BD blouses in the UK in the late 70's/early 80's, mainly thanks to the likes of Spandau Ballet, and other groups, wearing them.

  10. #20

    Default Re: What is this!!!

    Quote by jimpy View Post
    There was a big thing with wearing BD blouses in the UK in the late 70's/early 80's, mainly thanks to the likes of Spandau Ballet, and other groups, wearing them.
    I have fond memories of wearing a black yeomanry tunic to Londons Camden Palais on weekends during the mid 80's 'new romantic' era and thinking I was the bees knees. Bit off topic I'm afaid.

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