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WW2 Irvin Flying Jacket (original)?

Article about: Morning gents, I have spotted this flyer's jacket in my size, but have no idea how you would tell if it is WW2 vintage or not? The seller states that it is a mid-war jacket, with "light

  1. #1

    Default WW2 Irvin Flying Jacket (original)?

    Morning gents, I have spotted this flyer's jacket in my size, but have no idea how you would tell if it is WW2 vintage or not? The seller states that it is a mid-war jacket, with "lightening zippers" but as ever, I would appreciate any thoughts and advice from you more knowledgeable chaps! Thanks in advance, Leon.
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    "Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut." Ernest Hemingway

  2. #2

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    Looks OK. Quite a late one given it is made from small patches of leather.

    Cheers, Ade.
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  3. #3

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    Morning Ade, thanks for that bit of "info". I had no idea that you could date/age these by the amount/size of the panels! Very interesting and useful to know, thanks, Leon.
    "Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut." Ernest Hemingway

  4. #4

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    Agree looks ok , its a shame the label is missing but looks to be in good condition

  5. #5

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    yup very late war, they didn't always have labels though, and when they did they are often gone as they were thin linen things that ripped away easily. Materials shortages lead to the use of off cuts and small pieces to maximize production. Quarter panel backs are pretty much standard from '42 onwards. I put this one solidly into 1945. I have one that is a single solid panel that i likely from about 1937 or so, and under the back collar should be a pair of rings for an elasticized adjustment strap for the collar when worn turned up, often gone. But a good 'tell' for an original.

  6. #6

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    also the late war jackets had a much thinner varnish finishing coat on the outer surface and it flakes and crackles much more obviously than earlier jackets.

  7. #7

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    1943/45 Multi panel flying jacket, I know these are produced by companies like "Ace High jackets" but the wear on yours looks very hard to age from a modern one

    Aces High Jackets - Our Jackets
    Ben

  8. #8

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    Yep late war multi panel. I have 5 flying jackets all different. The one to get if you can is the early one piece panel at the back, no seam down the centre. Also genuine flying jackets never had any pockets. The lack of the label is common as these usually had the manufactures name and address on so ideal for the German bombers. Only one of mine has a label in, it shows the persons name, rank & number. Then that is lined through then someone else's name underneath. This one is the 2 panel one, just one centre seam. The different makers have slightly different traits as in the vent holes under the arm pits, the 'D' rings that are on the collar, the elastic collar strap that is on the back of the collar which most people think is a spare google strap. This was to hold the collar up. Once you get the bug for these it's hard to stop, I use mine for going out in, even when the weather is icy cold you can go out with just a tee shirt on, actually a tee shirt is all you need under one of these as they are so warm. Hope this is of some help. BTW a lovely jacket.
    Steve.
    Quilly58

  9. #9

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    Quote by Steven Macquillin View Post
    Yep late war multi panel. I have 5 flying jackets all different. The one to get if you can is the early one piece panel at the back, no seam down the centre. Also genuine flying jackets never had any pockets. The lack of the label is common as these usually had the manufactures name and address on so ideal for the German bombers. Only one of mine has a label in, it shows the persons name, rank & number. Then that is lined through then someone else's name underneath. This one is the 2 panel one, just one centre seam. The different makers have slightly different traits as in the vent holes under the arm pits, the 'D' rings that are on the collar, the elastic collar strap that is on the back of the collar which most people think is a spare google strap. This was to hold the collar up. Once you get the bug for these it's hard to stop, I use mine for going out in, even when the weather is icy cold you can go out with just a tee shirt on, actually a tee shirt is all you need under one of these as they are so warm. Hope this is of some help. BTW a lovely jacket.
    Steve.
    Forgot to mention that you need to feed the leather with a natural leather oil. Don't use a modern type as it will rot the stitching. If you need advice on the care of the jacket, try 'The Historic Flying Clothing Company' they are very helpful.
    Quilly58

  10. #10

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    Excellent additional information Steve, and thank you all very much for your help. It looks to be a good solid 1945 made jacket then! Cheers, Leon.
    "Always do sober what you said you'd do drunk. That will teach you to keep your mouth shut." Ernest Hemingway

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