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ERDL cover, too good to be true?

Article about: Will do, Ill update in ten minutes

  1. #11

    Default Re: ERDL cover, too good to be true?

    Will do, Ill update in ten minutes

  2. #12

    Default Re: ERDL cover, too good to be true?

    Well, I put some water on the spot I saw the faint text, and in sunlight the text got clearer! The date on the DLA stamp is 77, so it has to be ERDL as woodland was introduced in 1981. I tried to take pictures with my phone but the text isnt visible on the image, damn Nokia!

    Edit: Maybe the pattern is the "Delta ERDL" which has the black branches thicker, this would be very possible because it is post Vietnam.

  3. #13
    ?

    Default Re: ERDL cover, too good to be true?

    glad it worked

    The United States Marine Corps (USMC) adopted the brown ‘Highland’ version as standard issue from 1968, and later the U.S. Army introduced it on a wide scale in Southeast Asia. A third variation, known as 'Delta' from an alleged use in the Mekong Delta area of South Vietnam, was issued in the early 1970s. By the end of the Vietnam War, American troops wore camouflage combat dress as the norm.[7] 'Delta' ERDL is the same as 'Highland' pattern, but the black 'branches' appear thicker and less detailed. The ERDL-pattern combat uniform was identical in cut to the Olive Drab (OD) jungle fatigues; it was issued alongside.[8]

    Following the withdrawal of the US military from Vietnam in 1973, the Army no longer routinely issued camouflage clothing. The 1st Battalion, 13th Infantry Regiment wore the ERDL-leaf pattern as an experiment in the early 1970s in Baumholder, Germany. The USMC continued wearing the transitional ‘Delta’ ERDL pattern, which became general issue in the mid 1970s. It was to be used to equip the Rapid Deployment Force (RDF) while on tropical missions. Photographs during the 1979 Iranian hostage crisis showed US Embassy Marines wearing the RDF version ERDL uniforms when they were taken prisoner by Iranian revoultionaries.

    It was not until 1981 that the Army approved another camouflaged uniform. That year it officially introduced the battle dress uniform (BDU) in M81 Woodland pattern,[9] an enlarged and slightly altered version of ERDL-leaf, to supply all arms of the US Forces.[3] The last batches of the ERDL fatigues saw service during Operation Eagle Claw, Beirut and the Grenada Invasion
    ERDL pattern - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    shame someone took a black marker to it

  4. #14

    Default Re: ERDL cover, too good to be true?

    I forgot to thank you for the advice, so thank you! I will certainly remember the water trick if the next ERDL cover is also this worn out

    I just wonder, I bought this from a big company that has lots of these, and they bought them from a wholesaler, and the wholesaler either got them directly from U.S. or from another wholesaler, so I wonder, at what point could the markings have been drawn?

  5. #15
    ?

    Default Re: ERDL cover, too good to be true?

    your guess is as good as mine mate to be honest i don't think we'll ever truly know.

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