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M1 helmet rim

Article about: I just aquired a steel pot, M1 recently and it's a Schlueter rear seam but the rim edge is regular steel not stainless. I read somewhere that all rear seams were manufactured with stainless

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    Default M1 helmet rim

    I just aquired a steel pot, M1 recently and it's a Schlueter rear seam but the rim edge is regular steel not stainless. I read somewhere that all rear seams were manufactured with stainless steel rims. Were there exceptions?

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    denfly you have much to learn about the production of the M1 Helmet im afraid.like at any point in a transitional period,many older stock gets used in many forms and variants.towards the end of 1944 it was decided that the rim would be made of magenese steel the same as the shell as the on going problems with paint failing to adhere to stainless,around this time many variants are seen,some of the last front seamed are seen with this steel rim while many of the first rear seamed were fitted with stainless (again useing up old stock)it was around this time the seam was moved to the rear,I have never found a reason for this but generally as a rule most rear seams regardless of being a schlueter or a McCord are usually carrying the steel rim as the stainless ones are quite rare,so rule of thumb is stainless usually front seam with exception as stated and steel for rear seam,hope this has explained things a little................
    With Regards Jake.

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    I agree with ruddersrangers44 - Good advice.
    The good thing is that if you see a stainless rim (you can tell because usually some of the paint has worn away and it is shiny) then you know it is WWII manufactured.

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    Yes, I have a number of them with the "shiney" stainless steel, but this is the first I have with regular steel. It was sold as a Vietnam helmet.Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	600119 I thought all if not most were stainless steel during that period.

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    Funny thing, when I joined the Army in 1981, I was issued an M1 but the cover which was an ERDL, never could stay on properly. I'm sure it was a WW2 issue because the paint scheme was dark compared to others in my unit. Then when I was assigned to a unit, the M1 issue again was a dark green version and I was issued a 1980's camo cover that didn't fit well. I concurred that both times, I was issued a WW2 shell during those times but I didn't know the patterns then. If I knew then what I know now, I probably would be finanacially well off. Front seams, fixed bales, yeah, I ran into a few, but never knew the significance. I did however saved a WW1 canteen cup, 2 WW2 mess kits, and 2 Korean war utensil knives. Those items were marked. But if I knew about the helmets then, wow. I also saved Vietnam canvass belt gear. I worked supply on days one was needed. I was actually Field Artillery. They loved my record keeping. I did so at the motor pool also.

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    If we knew then what we know now, We all would have an awesome collection !!!!!!!!!
    Semper Fi
    Phil

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    If only. I remember the M1 I had in 1982 was used until 1985 until my unit was disbanded. That was for sure a WW2 issue. Darn where is that time machine. LOL.

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    Such an opportunity missed! The flaw in your plan would be if someone noticed that they were missing an absurd amount of helmets.

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    I'm starting to realize there were some rear seam stainless rims used by paratroopers during D-Day for some reason. And of course some front seam maganese steel rims were also made but few. These however are not seeked out by collectors.

  10. #10

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    Quote by denfly View Post
    Yes, I have a number of them with the "shiney" stainless steel, but this is the first I have with regular steel. It was sold as a Vietnam helmet.
    Too bad as this shell looks wrecked.........
    Regards,


    Steve.

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