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Tank identification

Article about: colt45 can you try and put your pics up again, they dont seem to be working.

  1. #11

    Default Re: Tank identification

    cheers for the pics, saves me from walking over there myself!

    i aint no good with tanks myself, but some great holes in some of them!

    I came across some scary big rusty shells myself.

  2. #12

    Default Re: Tank identification

    hello Neil yes theres some pretty unfriendly stuff out there apart from the adders,i enjoyed taking the pics but the bloody weather was typical otterburn bright one minute dull the next hence the changes in pic quality

  3. #13

    Default Re: Tank identification

    I was suprised with the weather to, i got sunburnt that day, normally it just rains for me!

    were you busy in the area?

  4. #14

    Default Re: Tank identification

    Wow, interesting post..

    I personally had the opportunity to fire a FT5 anti tank rocket at a centurion. The centurion is tuff! We still use a heavily upgraded version of the old centurion, the Olifant Mk2B.

    Cheers...
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #15

    Default Re: Tank identification

    Quote by Neil LW546 View Post
    I was suprised with the weather to, i got sunburnt that day, normally it just rains for me!

    were you busy in the area?
    we are always busy up on otterburn during the lambing season when no live firing takes place,we can access areas that are normally closed due to live firing to do clearance work and other eoc tasks ,when i used to come up here live firing in the 80s i hated the place as most squaddies did/do ,now i would be happy to live up here a beautifull place and friendly people

  6. #16

    Default Re: Tank identification

    Hi Neil,
    Thanks for the pics, brings back memories i remember Otterburn very well. Iv shot a couple of the tanks with the Charlie G, I.E,
    Carl Gustaf 84mm. nice big bang, you have to watch what hole you fall into as there are usualy a nice little round laying in the bottom of it. Hi, Spotter nice to see you again.
    dave.

  7. #17

    Default Re: Tank identification

    yer we never knew what was live or a dud one.
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  8. #18
    ?

    Default Re: Tank identification

    Lt Visser ..
    ..Thats a nice photo of the tank ...
    A question concerning the turret design ..
    Obviously the turret has been sloped for maximum projectile deflection, .. but also it's looks like there's a certain amount of "Stealth" technology there .. to deflect radar ?? would I be right in assuming that ??

    Regards

    Gary J.


    Quote by Lt Visser View Post
    Wow, interesting post..

    I personally had the opportunity to fire a FT5 anti tank rocket at a centurion. The centurion is tuff! We still use a heavily upgraded version of the old centurion, the Olifant Mk2B.

    Cheers...

  9. #19

    Default Re: Tank identification

    Gary J,
    The sloped armour in this model is only for maximum deflection if hit from the front. Remember that armour being hit from a very low angle is much "thicker" than armour hit at 90 degrees. The flat panels is not there to be stealth, allthough you are thinking in the right direction aviation wise.

    In my opinion the tanker of today has to be more worried about a thermal signature than a radar signature since most of todays anti tank weapons work with thermal sensors.

    Remember also that a stealth vehicle is still detectable on radar, but has a very small signature, thus difficult to identify.

    If you look at the photo you will see a box shaped device. This is basically a scope that allows the commander to look over a crest and not expose himself. We call it the crest crossing drill in mechanised infantry. As a platoon commander myself, I usually stand on the turret (see picture) of my vehicle with only my head above the crest and then give a terrain report to my company commander before crossing the crest..... With that device it's much easier!!

    I hope I answered your question..

    Cheers
    Jan

    P.S. Gary J, if you would like more pics of the South African National Defence Force, PM me.
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  10. #20
    ?

    Default Re: Tank identification

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