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1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

Article about: I don't see any other cuts other than the bolster cut. In looking past the rim the bore looks like 100 years of rust. Also the ramrod has been cut since there is no thread on the end. I real

  1. #11

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    USNV5 is correct, I am re-verting to WWI firearms yours was converted later from a flinter 18th cent to caplock. 18th century barrels where made with wrought iron I believe. Use of a mild steel /low carbon for barrels was implementing using coke early/mid 19th century well into civilwar. High carbon was being introduced mid/ late 19th century? (Spanish American, WWI) correct?

  2. #12
    ?

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    Yes. The use of steel for gun barrels began at US Arsenals in the 1840s - 1850s but it was not the average and was primarily used in the production of rifle barrels. Some US M1841 Rifles (the "Mississippi" Rifle) are actually marked "STEEL" on the breech to allow their condition and durability to be evaluated in comparison to the iron barrels in common service. As the more expensive but more durable (and harder to machine) steel began to be more common, new methods of manufacture began gradually evolving into what was to become the steel barrel that has been used in military and civilian production world wide since the 1880s.

  3. #13

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    Thankyou USNV5. I stand corrected.

  4. #14
    ?

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    Not at all Major Tom, I agree with you in principal.

  5. #15

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    What is the bore measurement? It looks like it might be a musket conversion to a fowler which was very common.

  6. #16

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    Habicht, Near as I can tell it's .71 in.

  7. #17

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    I'll bet it's a fowler. A good photo of the muzzel would help.

  8. #18
    ?

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    .71 measured at the muzzle shows that, with a little wear, it has not been reamed out for any reason. The actual caliber of the standard US musket (smoothbore) from 1792 when the first contract muskets were built for the Federal government until the M1842 musket was .69 caliber so .71 is well within normal tolerance for a M1816 like this. No evidence that it was converted to be a fowler though many muskets saw use in civilian reincarnation as shotguns without barrels being shortened and forearms and the front 2 barrel bands removed as was often done. It is a nice gun in relatively original "as issued" condition.

  9. #19

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    New twist...Found my bore light and took a peek inside. At approximately 8 inches or so there is a rib smaller diameter than the out side. I tried to scrape it with a ramrod and it seemed solid. Opinions?
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  10. #20

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    Is there any sign of the barrel being welded in half? I don't know about this one. kind of looks like a pipe is stuck inside it. I don't think Ive seen that before. It sort of has a octagonal shape.

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