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1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

Article about: I don't see any other cuts other than the bolster cut. In looking past the rim the bore looks like 100 years of rust. Also the ramrod has been cut since there is no thread on the end. I real

  1. #21

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    I don't see any other cuts other than the bolster cut. In looking past the rim the bore looks like 100 years of rust. Also the ramrod has been cut since there is no thread on the end. I really should take care of my deck!
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  2. #22

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    I do not have a answer for you on this one from my computer screen I can only guess it might be fowling/rust or something is jammed inside as far as I know I think most military issued muskets had the threading on the ram rod if made of metal Im not sure why that has been cut off interesting, Im sort of contemplating the facts if this was purposely done maybe to keep it from ever shooting?? de-activated, could possibly have been a prop or used as a drill rifle or something?. Kind of strange. I like to see what USNV5 has to say about this.

    Regards
    Tom

  3. #23
    ?

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    Quote by Major Tom View Post
    .......... I like to see what USNV5 has to say about this.

    Regards
    Tom

    Hmmm.... Doing some research before I give what could be an ill-considered (incorrect?) answer. As Arnold said, "I'll be back."

  4. #24

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    I had time to remove the barrel. The underside of the barrel is almost pit free and it has several numbers stamped in it. It looks as though there is a notch for a rifled site?
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  5. #25

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    Quote by jamped55 View Post
    I had time to remove the barrel. The underside of the barrel is almost pit free and it has several numbers stamped in it. It looks as though there is a notch for a rifled site?
    I see what appears to be a rack no. (41), can not distinguish the other stamping looks like a proof mark, as far as the notch its most likely for a wedge tensioner to be inserted to keep the stock or a stock from moving? having the rear sight under a rifle would prove to be very in-effective Lol!! can get a close-up shot of the markings??

  6. #26

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    Will take more pictures tomorrow....It was my thought that the barrel was replaced later and they used a cobbled one. The stock also has numbers stamped into it however I can't tell what they are, even under a magnifying light. Here are more pictures!
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    Last edited by jamped55; 06-10-2013 at 10:38 PM.

  7. #27
    ?

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    Quote by jamped55 View Post
    New twist...Found my bore light and took a peek inside. At approximately 8 inches or so there is a rib smaller diameter than the out side. I tried to scrape it with a ramrod and it seemed solid. Opinions?
    Do you mean 8 inches from the breech? That is interesting and points to a ring of fouling as may have been suggested already. But..... See if you can get an accurate length from the muzzle to this mysterious ring. Do this by sliding a metal rod down the barrel and seeing how far it goes by measuring your results.

    Many of these muskets were still in original flint at the beginning of the American Civil War in 1861 and were issued as such by the Federal government to state troops coming into the ranks. Flint muskets were common on both sides - both Federal and Confederate - through 1861 and even into 1862, even in battle. Also, the "cone in barrel" conversions done before the War at the National Armories (Harpers Ferry and Springfield) were found to be less than safe, the cone (percussion nipple) could and often did blow out when the pressure caused the cone's threads to strip so, along with the flint muskets, many of these were converted by installing a new breech. You may have a chambered breech installed by a Federal contractor at this time. The new steel breech was much stronger. If you look at some of your more recent photos, you will see a seam where the barrel meets the new breech section in front of the bolster. If your reduced diameter ring is slightly (1/2 inch or so) in front of the visible seam then that is what it is - the chambered breech first used by the British gunmaker Henry Nock in the late 18th Century. Very strong and safe. If it is not there but further forward, it is a ring of hard fouling.

    And the numbers shown on the bottom of the barrel are assembly numbers applied by the contractor during the conversion (most of them were in Philadelphia but some were in Delaware and, I believe, New Jersey). The long slash shown across the bottom of the barrel and just touching the new bolster is an alignment mark showing where the breech needed to be turned to if removed for work latter.

    That dovetail worries me. Under no conditions would I fire this musket. Of course I could be wrong, I would have to have it in hand to look at it but it appears to be too deep to be safe. I can not imagine what it is doing there.

    There, sorry to have taken so long to get back with my thoughts on this, I had some surgery done and it wasn't possible to reply before now. The source of the information is George D. Moller's wonderful series of publications on American military shoulder arms. In particular the recently published American Military Shoulder Arms, Volume III: Flintlock Alterations and Muzzleloading Percussion Shoulder Arms, 1840-1865. His works completely cover the early Colonial Period and on to the end of the American Civil War - 1607 to 1865. So far, about 1500 pages between the three volumes and still more to come!

  8. #28

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    USNV5, The ring is only 9 inches from the end of the muzzle. I hope the surgery went well...

  9. #29
    ?

    Default Re: 1826 B Evans "Valley Forge" musket

    Well, as Roseanne Rosanna Dana often said, "Never mind".

    It is, then, just a ring of concreted fouling. With some care it could be removed.

    And thanks, the surgery went very well.

  10. #30

    Default

    Hello and please forgive my intrusion. I found this site and thread through a Google search of a W I Evans musket I have and am doing some housecleaning. The piece I have is dated 1833. What I know about it I have learned from this thread. It has been in the corner of the living room for some 50 years +-. It appears to be a flintlock, which was modified to be a percussion rifle. The fore end of the stock has been cut off just above the lower bracket that fastens it to the barrel. The tamping rod is complete and used to screw in when I was a kid, it no longer screws in (probably from being banged down by six different 10 year olds over the years). The rod penetrates the barrel clean down to the hammer so it seems to be clear. The barrel is rusty from age but does not look like it's seen much weather. If anyone is interested in this rifle I can and will take pics. If not any input and direction would be appreciated.
    Thanks for any and all help.

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