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18th Century Mewis Blunderbuss?

Article about: Hey guys, blunderbuss has been in my Opas collection for over 20 years and this weekend my mom finally got around to holland to take pictures for me. I honestly have no clue when it comes to

  1. #1
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    Default 18th Century Mewis Blunderbuss?

    Hey guys, blunderbuss has been in my Opas collection for over 20 years and this weekend my mom finally got around to holland to take pictures for me. I honestly have no clue when it comes to antique firearms, from the little research I have done it shows that Mewis is a very sought after maker and is fairly rare.
    All help would be greatly appreciated and will be going directly to my Opa.
    Thanks
    Ryan
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  2. #2

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    From it's condition alone, I would say that this is a replica Blunderbuss. At 200 years old, the shoulder stock shows very little handling and contact marks and the screw heads have no marks of having been turned in and out countless times over the years. The soft brass parts such as the under side acorn and the flower engraving on the guard show no wear from cleaning, handling or polishing.
    Interestingly enough, it looks as if it may be a Fire-able replica, so you may want to have it looked over by a gunsmith and see if it would be able to be shot.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  3. #3

    Default

    You would be surprised will at how well some of these things bare the wrath of time. I know a guy who has a PERFECT 1793 (I think it was 93) brown Bess with almost no signs of ageing which has never been refinished (although in all fairness it was sitting in a warehouse wrapped in paper for 200 years, but still). As for this one I don't believe the muzzle is right and I don't think the makers name is in the right place either. I'm guessing it's an older replica.

  4. #4
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    Default

    I'm not sure if it is not real. I am no expert on these but William Mewis & Co., 1765-1782 did make blunderbuss.
    A RARE British Sea Service flintlock Blunderbuss by William Mewis & Co., 1765-1782.|Antique Firearms, Swords, and Militaria
    I will have to look at my proof mark book to see if I can find those that are one the barrel.

    Semper Fi
    Phil

  5. #5
    CBH
    CBH is online now
    ?

    Default

    The proof marks on the barrel seem to be cast with the barrel , not stamped . And the overall unused look makes me think replica

  6. #6
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    Default

    Now I am quoting from my book" The Standard Directory of Proof Marks" By Gerhard Wirnsberger translated by RA Steindler.
    England.
    The Charter of the Worship Company of Gunmakers makes mention of private test of proof and this appears to trace back to barrel proofing which apparently stared back in the early part of the 17th century..........
    In the year 1670 the charter was confirmed that the power of the organization was extended. The crown over the GP was retained and yet another proof was was added-The inspection after proof- and this was marked with Crown Over V.. So it look's like the barrel proofings are good.
    That is a beautiful Blunderbuss!!!!!!!
    I hope this tidbit helps
    Semper Fi
    Phil

  7. #7

    Default

    As CBH said, the markings on the barrel do not look to be Stamped into it but rather Cast into it. The replica makers tried to be as minutely accurate as worldly possible but there is no way that they could or would even want to put 300 years of age and patina onto it. 300 years old, the iron fitting would be black and so would the brass. 300 year old iron oxidizes despite any treatment given it. Just look at the weapons in the Tower of London collection, etc. And it hasn't been polished once in 3 centuries-as evidenced by the fine engraving on the brass? It's a beautifully made replica and is probably functional as well, but it's certainly not 3 centuries old. Keep in mind, this is Not a "fake" but rather a fully made Replica of a historic weapon for collectors.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  8. #8
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    Default

    So do you think the Blunderbuss in the link I posted is also a Replica?
    The condition of these look very similar.

    Semper Fi
    Phil

  9. #9

    Default

    The blunderbuss in the link resembles in design and configuration the one originally posted, but on the one in the link- look closely at the signs of obvious age. The shoulder stock, for example, the wood is darkened from centuries of bare handed carrying and handling and exhibits many small dings,dents and bump marks. The color itself of the wood is an almost marbled effect. The iron screws are age darkened and show previous signs of having been turned in and out -some may even have been replaced- and if there ever had been any bit of engraving and ornamentation in the brass, it has long since vanished with time. No acorn-no flower, etc. The iron fittings of the link's gun show countless tiny contact marks that have patina inside them-as do the brass parts as well-look at the area surrounding the muzzle. And, yes-the markings on the barrel are quite similar in design, but note how the one in the link's markings appear to be Stamped with a punch and hammer -almost carved into the brass. The appearance between the 2 sets of markings is glaringly different. The original posted guns markings are in cartouches and look to be cast into the barrel.
    The original posted gun is not, by any means brand new. But it is nowhere near 300+ years either. It's a very well made replica, but...? Well, not the same.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  10. #10

    Default

    the first shotgun

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