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1937 Mosin Nagant worth it?

Article about: Hi all- I have the opportunity to buy a 1937 Mosin Nagant that's in excellent condition (although I prefer a bit of 'rough' condition), all the serial numbers are matching apart from the bol

  1. #1

    Default 1937 Mosin Nagant worth it?

    Hi all- I have the opportunity to buy a 1937 hex receiver Mosin Nagant that's in excellent condition (although I prefer a bit of 'rough' condition), all the serial numbers are matching apart from the bolt, and it has no import marks. The seller is asking $200. Is this a fair price? I know this forum isn't a price guide but I would really appreciate your opinions as to if you would take this deal or not.

    I don't have pictures of it at the moment (I saw it at a militaria event, and I gave the guy my contact info and he said he will send me photos of it tomorrow as it's still available).

    Thanks.

  2. #2

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    If the bolt doesn't match the rest of the gun, in regard to the serial numbers, it is likely unsafe to shoot. I bought one like that and the headspace was so bad the bolt jammed shut after 2 rounds. It became a $75 wall hanger. I wouldn't pay that much for it personally.

  3. #3
    PRE
    PRE is offline
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    Default

    1937, and it has a hex receiver? That sounds unusual.

    Pat

  4. #4

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    Quote by PRE View Post
    1937, and it has a hex receiver? That sounds unusual.

    Pat
    I'm not well up on this series of rifles but wouldn't the "Hex" receiver date from the earliest production in late 19th Century?

    Regards

    Mark
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  5. #5

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    Quote by PRE View Post
    1937, and it has a hex receiver? That sounds unusual.

    Pat
    I understand there are hex receiver models dated into the 1940s.
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  6. #6

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    Well, the hex receiver lasted until ‘35 at Izhevsk and ‘36 at Tula, after these dates only round receivers were built. However I think it is not impossible that some rifles were produced using ‘37 barrels matched to leftover ‘36 dated receivers. If the receiver has an early date on the tang it would be a good sign of an arsenal rework.

  7. #7
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    If this is one that was arsenal rebuilt with /forced eletro penciled serial numbers, they were sold for $99 a couple years ago.

    So go from there.

    Semper Fi
    Phil

  8. #8

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    I have seen Tula rifles with hex receivers as late as 1939. I believe Izhevsk switched to the round receiver around ‘35 or so as stated before. Do you know the manufacturer? As far as price goes, these rifles have shot up significantly in the last couple years. $200 is not outrageous price if you like the rifle.

  9. #9

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    "Receivers There are many minor receiver variations, especially during WWII, but only two major configurations, hex and round. Hex receivers were standard from the beginning of M91 production and used for M91/30s until 1935 at Izhevsk and 1936 at Tula. 1935 was a low production year at Izhevsk, but serial number evidence appears to point to the hex receiver being the less common. 1936 Tula receivers are split almost equally between hex and round. A significant number of older receivers were used to build new rifles at both Izhevsk and Tula. This would be the case with any post 1935 dated Izhevsk or post 1936 dated Tula M91/30 with a hex receiver. These receivers were not "old stock" but were stripped from damaged or worn out rifles. Dates and arsenals, which are typically found on the bottom of the tang by removing the action from the stock, run the gamut of all M91 production and the specifics are not important with the exception of antique/non-firearm status (1898 or earlier) under US law and this only for purposes of shipping and transfers among non-licensed individuals. Early production receivers are often not marked or dated so exact specifics can't always be determined. New England Westinghouse receivers are not dated but would have been made from 1915 to 1917. A number of 1941 Izhevsk M91/30s on hex receivers have been documented and 1943 and 1944 hex receiver Tula M91/30s are not considered rare by any means. Any of these are a good find though and demonstrate the need to make use of any possible resources during WWII."

    Quoted from 7.62x54r.net.
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  10. #10

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    The seller finally sent me photos. Over the phone, he told me it was a 1937 hex, but here you can clearly see it’s not. I don’t know how he could’ve gotten that wrong. The mosin is in excellent condition. I believe it to be Tula made, and if I’m not wrong that is a bit harder to find? Based on these photos, would you guys buy this for $200?

    Lastly, can you guys tell me some things about the marks? I know that some pics aren’t the best quality, but that’s what he sent me. I will ask for some higher quality pics tomorrow.

    1937 Mosin Nagant worth it?1937 Mosin Nagant worth it?1937 Mosin Nagant worth it?1937 Mosin Nagant worth it?

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