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1939 98K All Matching Rifle

Article about: Hello all, I got a call today from a US Army vet looking to part with a 98K rifle he picked up from the family of the GI who shipped it home. Apparently they have the capture papers, but hav

  1. #41

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    Thx! I know just a little, there's a lot to know - detail wise - on 98k's, otherwise it's just a gun and I've been into Third Reich weapons, and other vintage guns, for a long time. The bolts are fun to take apart to clean on these, and if it's like a Luger, the firing pin should be numbered to the gun. If it is, you need to go buy a Lotto ticket!

    Anyway, don't take the bolt apart without reading up on it first, watching a competent Youtube video. It's fairly easy but if you miss the first step, wow... you're in a world of hurt, especially if you're a soldier! Anyway, I think the safety lever has to be straight up is the trick, but yeah, definitely study it first.

    And then let us know if the firing pin matches, although someone may chime in a and say they are not numbered on there. But as nutty as they were about numbering, my guess is they did.

    I have a late war Brunn (Czech) made dot 1944, pretty much a night and day difference from one of these, and none of the small parts are numbered, except on the bolt. And many of the parts are stamped, not milled, like the trigger guard assembly and mag bottom, and both barrel bands, stamped, and the blueing was different. A little later in 1945, they dropped bluing and started Phospating, a gray parkerizing that is a bit of an acquired taste... so some of the 1945 code rifles are grey, I think they made some other cuts too, dropped the bayonet lug (?), dropped the take down disk in the stock.

    That's what that is, btw. The disc in the stock is to take the bolt down, you could totally use it, I doubt it will mar it and that's what it's made for ;-) But you can also use the edge of a table or desk as a place to compress the firing pin spring.

    If you're good, you can take that bolt apart in probably 30 seconds, and put it back together in under a minute.

    It's cool to teach yourself how to take something down like that, a Luger, P38, 1911, and put it back together in around a minute, but then in time you forget, and sit there like an idiot... Like, ok... what do I do now?

    And it's usually worse on reassembly

  2. #42
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    I will take a look and see if the firing pin is numbered! If it is, well that would be something. I learned the hard way with stripping a weapon when I purchased my 1911. It is a modern pistol by Springfield and a fun gun to shoot. But it took me an embarrassingly long time to strip it and put together! I have gotten better since that first try, but I have a ways to go!

  3. #43
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    Quote by SRB View Post
    Very nice,I have an identical stock...........bayonet come with rifle?
    The purchase came with 2 bayonets, one that is very worn with quite a bit of rust and one that has zero markings and is in nice shape. I think the one with no markings is a repro. It has a very strange look to it. Neither are original to the rifle though.

  4. #44

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    Post pics of the bayonets. You'll definitely want to be looking out for a '39 dated bayonet with matching scabbard, with frog still on it is always nice and the date should be close. These bayonets are usually really nice high polish like the older stuff, E.F Horster comes to mind, Mundlos, others I can't remember... The later bayonets are all coded, mine is an fnj43, and pretty damn rough but still really nice pieces.

    That's part of the fun of owning a 98k.

    Congrats







    PS I saw a cleaning rod, that is to the rifle, right?

  5. #45
    SRB
    SRB is offline
    ?

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    Quote by dramos View Post
    The purchase came with 2 bayonets, one that is very worn with quite a bit of rust and one that has zero markings and is in nice shape. I think the one with no markings is a repro. It has a very strange look to it. Neither are original to the rifle though.
    no markings is export bayonets 90% not need be repro,but upper is repro at least scabbard (100%).It would be nice to set the bayonet pictures.

  6. #46

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    Quote by dramos View Post
    I will take a look and see if the firing pin is numbered!
    Being a pre war rifle, I bet it does! These are some pics of my 243 1938 K98. As you can see, even the barrel band spring is serialized.
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  7. #47

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    I didn't want to say it but field stripping the 1911... I can take a Luger apart and put it back together in half the time. But it's all about practice.

  8. #48
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    Hey guys. Here are the photos of the two bayonet I picked up with the rifle. The first group of photos is the newer looking bayonet, the second group is the the salty bayo. Marked EF Horster on the sheath. The bayo and sheath do not match.
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  9. #49
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    I also took a leap and disassembled the bolt. It was easier than I thought once I watched one or two (or a lot more) videos on how to do it. Sure enough the firing pin is numbered and matches the rest of the rifle!
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  10. #50

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    Way to go man, awesome!

    I think you're right, the one bayo is an ugly repro, and the other one is kinda shot. You just missed a gob on eBay but there others out there. A guy listed about 20 bayonets just a little while back, about three quarter dress and the rest combat, all pretty nice, and most with frogs.

    It could cost you two fitty to get the right one, but the rifle is worth it, and you'll still be in it for under $1k.

    Sight hood too, if it's grooved for it. Totally changes the look of the rifle.

    Hard to find a real one, but they're out there.

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