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1939 98K All Matching Rifle

Article about: Hello all, I got a call today from a US Army vet looking to part with a 98K rifle he picked up from the family of the GI who shipped it home. Apparently they have the capture papers, but hav

  1. #1
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    Default 1939 98K All Matching Rifle

    Hello all,

    I got a call today from a US Army vet looking to part with a 98K rifle he picked up from the family of the GI who shipped it home. Apparently they have the capture papers, but have no idea where they are.

    I took a look at it today and took as many photos as I could, but I am hoping for the opinion of people who have dealt with these. I have never actually handled one until today. I did get to shoot three rounds through her and she shot great. Rifle over has nice bluing on it, some has worn off in areas and shows wear. The stock threw me off because of the strange tiger striping it had. I know this is the grain of the wood, but it almost looks like someone tried to strip the original finish off of the stock. The story the owner gave me was that rifles with this striping were chosen/given to officers. No idea how true that is though.

    It appears to be all matching, but I got home and realized I did not check that stock. I would make the quick assumption that it is, as the rest of the rifle appears to be all matching.

    Any advice, comments or things to watch out for would be much appreciated. There will be quite a few photos, so give me a second while I get them posted.
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  2. #2

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    Nice rifle. First thing I would do is dump that sling and get an original.

    Steve

  3. #3
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    Default

    Thanks Steve! Yeah, the sling needs to go asap. Any ideas on the strange finish of the stock?

  4. #4

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    Hey Doug

    Not sure about the finish myself so will refrain from comment. Someone with more experience will hopefully comment on it.

    Steve

  5. #5
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    Default

    Thanks Steve!

  6. #6

    Default

    It's not "tiger striping" like figured or "flame" maple or quatersawn Oak... it's a laminated stock, and that particular story about those stocks going to officers - SS of course - is pure bunk... Someone who knows this code (Borsigwalde I think) should be able to tell you if that's even appropriate for a 1939 rifle but it could be.

    No offense, but how can someone out there buying a 98k know this little about them, or have never seen a laminated stock before? Standard furniture on any Eastern Bloc AK, btw... and those are a dime a dozen at shops, shows, etc.

    The stock came in mostly two configurations; Walnut, with a flat steel buttplate like yours, and laminated (later rifles) with cupped buttplates.

    I just got done looking at a half dozen 243 codes on the net and I found one with a laminated stock, here.

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    SOLD - Luftwaffe Mauser "243" Code 1939 Dated K98 | Legacy Collectibles

    Edit; Earlier I posted this one thinking it was Walnut, because it looked like Walnut, but after actually reading the ad (reading helps), it says it's laminated, so I looked at some close-ups, and it was. Probably one of the worst looking laminated stocks I've seen or bad pics. They are usually fairly striking and instantly recognizable.

    Nice looking rifle but what is that odd Ru on the receiver (hopefully not denoting Russian capture?), any 243 code experts in the house?

    Also strange is a large "Imperial" eagle in that same general area? In 1939?

    Can you edit your post title and mention the receiver code? It would help.
    Last edited by Larboard; 01-17-2016 at 07:06 AM.

  7. #7
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    Default

    Sorry for not being clear, I have seen a laminated stock. What I had not seen was the deeper lines of red compared to the rest of the stock. Which is what my statement about not knowing if someone had tried to remove the finish.

    From what Inhave seen the "RU" stands for the manufacturer Ruhrstahl. I believe Russian captures are marked RC.

    I think an admin will need to adjust the title of the thread.

  8. #8

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    Do you know how to pull the barreled action from the stock?

    Release the upper handguard (watch a youtube video if you can't figure it out), don't booger anything, it's easy. The handguard should be numbered to the rifle.

    Then undo the capture screws, and then the action screws (keep all screws in the order they are in for reassembly, the stock and action will separate, if it doesn't be gentle and push it out or put the rifle upside down on the couch and let the weight of the action help.

    The stock should be numbered under the barrel area.

    If all the numbers match, then that is the original stock, the rifle is seemingly all original matching.

    I can't believe the prices on these, really?

  9. #9

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    The rifles are never marked RC, they just have many telltale marks, none of which are on your rifle.

    The red striping on the laminated stock might have something to do with the glue?

    Or it's just wood grain, but personally I think it's as sharp as can be. I really like laminated stocks. Don't be afraid to go over it with a little furniture oil, lemon oil or similar (liquid, NOT a spray can), won't hurt a thing and will make it look really nice. Don't use too much and use your fingers to rub it on the surface. A rag can catch a sliver and break it off the stock, or pieces of rag can get stuck in the wood here and there, this wood can get a little brittle over time, in the places where it meets the action, barrel, etc.

    Yes, sometimes you can't edit your top post anymore, never did figure out why... in which case you would have to get an admin to lend a hand.

  10. #10
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    Default

    Thanks Larboard, I will be going back to look at it tomorrow, so I will check out the inside portion of the upper hand guard and stock.

    I was shocked at the prices as well, don't really see why they command the price they do. Seller wants $600 for this one. Opinions?

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