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(Almost) mint 91/30 PU

Article about: Hello gentlemen; recently the market here (as in USA, I guess) has been invaded by hundreds of 91/30 PU's, coming from Russia. These guns are genuine snipers, but reworked post war at differ

  1. #1

    Default (Almost) mint Mosin Nagant sniper 91/30 PU

    Hello gentlemen; recently the market here (as in USA, I guess) has been invaded by hundreds of 91/30 PU's, coming from Russia. These guns are genuine snipers, but reworked post war at different stages by the arsenals down there... It means that in most cases the scope and the stocks have been replaced and/or refurbished, the metal reblued, bolts changed and restamped and so on.
    But there were some needles in the haystack.
    I found this one which is almost mint: Izhevsk factory made it (I guess, judging by the block suffix) around the end of 1944, if not at the beginning of the 1945, and I strongly doubt it was issued and fielded; so, probably, left alone and not refurbished because it was as new.

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    Last edited by ziomanno; 07-23-2015 at 08:57 PM.

  2. #2

    Default (almost) mint Mosin Nagant sniper 91/30 PU

    As you can see, the scope hasn't been refurbished (and thus the lenses are a bit foggy), but most important, this is the scope which the rifle was issued, zeroed and matched with: in fact, the serial number of the scope is stamped on the barrel shank, without renumbering. The bluing is also the original one: as for the scope number, the rifle's serial number is in the white, and it means that it was applied after the bluing of the barrel/receiver.
    The other serialized parts are also original to the rifle, because fonts and numbers matches. The stock is a correct late war Izhevsk, with the factory cartouches: unfortunately, the Russian or German importer applied a heavy coat of shellac over the original stock finish (and also over the barrel bands!), but this is the only "damage" suffered by the rifle, because the import markings have been applied on the upper barrel, so are concealed by the handguard.
    The rifling is impeccable, with the crown intact and mirror bright bore.
    If it could talk, probably would describe only boring decades spent in a remote arsenal that, luckily, acted as a time capsule...

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    Last edited by ziomanno; 07-23-2015 at 08:56 PM.

  3. #3
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    I don't think you will upgrade that one.

  4. #4

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    Very nice! On my list to get one! We have very bad import stamps on the bulk of most Mosins in the USA. Stupid US law. (Stamps on the rifle by the company who brought them into the country, on current mosins they are the size of a billboard right on the receiver place of origin, importer, caliber, new serial number) I have 13 mosins only one is not import stamped....

  5. #5
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    AWESOME!!!! Anybody would be proud to have that in their collection, Me included
    Great pickup! Do you plan on taking it to the range and see how she prints on paper?
    Semper Fi
    Phil

  6. #6

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    Lovely!
    Had good advice? Saved money? Why not become a Gold Club Member, just hit the green "Join WRF Club" tab at the top of the page and help support the forum!

  7. #7

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    Quote by AZPhil View Post
    Do you plan on taking it to the range and see how she prints on paper?
    Semper Fi
    Phil
    Actually, I did it. And the results were quite impressive: these rifles were zeroed at the factory, and then the scope base screws stacked in place

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    So, when I reassembled the scope assembly, I had the same adjustment made in 1944... With this result

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    This is a group of five shots at 100 meters (both scope turrets at "zero"); I used handloads ammos, with .308 bullets instead of the Russian .311 rounds issued wartime, because the bore is more "tight" than standard Mosins.
    Obviously, with the help of a rest, because she shoots much more better than me.
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  8. #8

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    A nice tight grouping!
    Author of... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack: Andersonstown.. Voices From 9 Battery Royal Artillery In Northern Ireland'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

  9. #9

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    Superb!
    Had good advice? Saved money? Why not become a Gold Club Member, just hit the green "Join WRF Club" tab at the top of the page and help support the forum!

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