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Colt Vickers MG

Article about: Help ,can anybody give me an idea what Colt Vickers aircraft machine value of this would be. I recently found one in an old trunk in my grandfathers estate,the serial number is A1502 cal.11

  1. #1

    Default Colt Vickers MG

    Help ,can anybody give me an idea what Colt Vickers aircraft machine value of this would be. I recently found one in an old trunk in my grandfathers estate,the serial number is A1502 cal.11 mmit seems to be complete.

  2. #2
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    Pictures are a must friend.
    They must be uploaded to the forum. Do not use a photo hosting site.
    Thanks

  3. #3

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    If it has not been registered pre 1968 ot the moratorium extention in 1984 or isn't deactivated in accordance with ATF guidelines it is worth nothing and will need to be surrenderred to the ATF for destruction or turned over to federal heritage agency under a title 10 transfer, the Air force museum in Dayton would be interested, get in touch with Terry Aiken. These were an oddity, 1000 made, sold as surplus in total in the early 1920's.

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    Can it not be taken to a registered gunsmith and have it deactivated?
    That is done here in Canada, sometimes!

    Dean O

  5. #5

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    Hi Dean,

    Nope, Firearms - Frequently Asked Questions - National Firearms Act (NFA) - Firearms | ATF, the only avenue is the Form 10 transfer to a federal agency if it does not have paperwork from the moratorium there is no way to legally transfer or gain title.

    here is some info on the weapon

    Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #6
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    That really *****, as so many great weapons will be lost...Here, "so I am told" wink wink. If you find a weapon, and can somehow get it too an understanding and willing legal gunsmith, they may be willing to dewat it and give it paperwork to state it is safe to own.

    OK not all above board, but once you have the dewat and the paper to go with it, you can own it..and an other piece of History is saved.

    Not that I WOULD EVER DO IT, however an option, and I understand it does happen here..and again, history saved

    Just my thoughts

    Thank you

    Dean O

  7. #7

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    Lets hope this one is already a deac.........
    Regards,


    Steve.

  8. #8

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    If this is in the US you have to remove and destroy the right side plate. Do it yourself to save A LOT of trouble. Just a matter of grinding down some rivet heads for removal. The kit you are left with in itself is pretty valuable and can be used to legally build up a semi-auto version. DESTROY the side plate you remove as it's something you never want to get caught with but also remove any attachments that are not the single plate of steel. I have not started my builds yet but do have a couple differing "demilled" Vickers kits and legal semi-auto and dummy side plates. This too is a decent way (albeit not preferred) to preserve something historical such as this and especially if it has any sentimental value.

    Take it to a gunsmith or authority and chances are you won't see any of it again.

    Also, if this is a true Colt gun, that parts kit can be worth a mint. The individual parts alone are extremely scarce.

  9. #9

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    [QUOTE=CampX;1171757]That really *****, as so many great weapons will be lost...Here, "so I am told" wink wink. If you find a weapon, and can somehow get it too an understanding and willing legal gunsmith, they may be willing to dewat it and give it paperwork to state it is safe to own.

    OK not all above board, but once you have the dewat and the paper to go with it, you can own it..and an other piece of History is saved.

    Not that I WOULD EVER DO IT, however an option, and I understand it does happen here..and again, history saved


    I once did that. I was given an Mg08 by the (now gone) regimental museum here in Warrington in exchange for a Vickers gun. The Maxim was still live, and eventually it was taken off me by the police and placed in a cell at the police HQ in Chester. For once, sanity prevailed. And the firearms officer allowed me to have a section 5 RFD pick it up and deactivate it for me. I know all this may sound far-fetched. But it just happens to be perfectly true!
    Author of... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack: Andersonstown.. Voices From 9 Battery Royal Artillery In Northern Ireland'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

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