Page 18 of 19 FirstFirst ... 8141516171819 LastLast
Results 171 to 180 of 182

Cut Down Lee Enfield

Article about: I am still 100% certain that this was a RE modified weapon. The fact that the picture is taken in the Hill 60 museum where mining was at its peak would back this up. Sappers cut them down be

  1. #171

    Default

    Further information on the cut-down Lee Enfield. a picture scanned from my copy of Skennerton's bible on the Lee Enfield. Obviously some differences from the example first shown which started this whole debate.




    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	cut-down.jpg 
Views:	6 
Size:	320.9 KB 
ID:	999002
    Books published to date... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack - Andersonstown'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

  2. #172

    Default

    So, the gun posted is Not a mortar initiator? Interesting....
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  3. #173

    Default

    Quote by Wagriff View Post
    So, the gun posted is Not a mortar initiator? Interesting....
    I think that the answer lies in Skennerton's text, where he says: "In some cases these were merely cut-down rifle actions like the Mk111 S.M.L.E. illustrated here." Closer examination of the picture suggests that the gun is a chopped Mk1 - not a Mk111. There is no charger bridge, but it looks as though the receiver has the characteristic 'hump' which acted as a 'stop' to the charger guide fixed to the bolt-head. I have only managed to track down one other picture of a chopped SMLE like the one at the beginning of this thread. Nothing can be ruled out, but I just cannot find anything which supports the theory of such guns being used in tunnel warfare. Here say isn't strong enough evidence to support the claim. I may contact the school of infantry in Warminster and see if they can shed any light on it.

    cheers,
    Steve.
    Books published to date... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack - Andersonstown'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

  4. #174

    Default

    Quote by lithgow View Post
    Hello-a film under production in Aust. about miners and ye olde fashion explosive mining in WW1 shows them being armed with cut down Lee Enfields for possible use in counter mining fights in the tunnels-revolvers were officers weapons not freely available to ORs and modifing what ever was available is a long tradition for such industrial workers, also remembering they were tough bastards not concerned much with 'higher authority'. Held with both hands at arms length it would have been better than nothing.
    Yep i watched that film last week and it's called Beneath hill 60, during an underground battle scene they do indeed use cut down Enfields!...
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  5. #175

    Default

    I have seen a WW1 film where Lee Enfield No 4's are used by the British, and export models of the Gew 98's by the Germans. I've also seen smooth-jacketed Vickers guns being used by Turks in a film about Gallipoli... And don't get me going on the wrong type of aircraft in the battle of Britain film! God help us all if we start to take it as gospel what we see in films...
    Books published to date... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack - Andersonstown'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

  6. #176

    Default

    Quote by HARRY THE MOLE View Post
    I have seen a WW1 film where Lee Enfield No 4's are used by the British, and export models of the Gew 98's by the Germans. I've also seen smooth-jacketed Vickers guns being used by Turks in a film about Gallipoli... And don't get me going on the wrong type of aircraft in the battle of Britain film! God help us all if we start to take it as gospel what we see in films...
    Couldn't agree more!....
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  7. #177

    Default

    I've been in touch with a friend of mine today, Prof Michael LoCicero of Birmingham University. He tells me that he actually owns a cut-down Lee Enfield which he excavated at Mametz wood in the 1980's. It is currently with his father back in the USA, but he will try to get him to photograph it for the forum.
    Books published to date... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack - Andersonstown'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

  8. #178

    Default

    Quote by HARRY THE MOLE View Post
    I've been in touch with a friend of mine today, Prof Michael LoCicero of Birmingham University. He tells me that he actually owns a cut-down Lee Enfield which he excavated at Mametz wood in the 1980's. It is currently with his father back in the USA, but he will try to get him to photograph it for the forum.
    Look forward to it Steve!...
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  9. #179

    Default

    And what did he say it was used for?
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  10. #180

    Default

    Quote by Wagriff View Post
    And what did he say it was used for?
    He didn't say what his example was used for, but he did quote an extract from a book written by Brigadier-General W.D. Villier-Stuart...

    'When last in 'Y' Wood sector (Ypres) I had seen that the bombers were very much hampered by their rifles. I thought a lot about it and finally took a salvaged rifle along to the Field Ordnance repair shop and got a conductor to cut it down to a 12-inch barrel, re-braze the foresight block and sight to the muzzle of that, and remove the back-sight and bed altogether, cutting a 'V' in the bridge charger guide to replace it (the upper sling swivel was discarded and the lower band shifted back to take a sling swivel).

    'This made a very good close-quarter weapon and the nose cap being repositioned on the shortened fore-end meant that a sword (bayonet) could be fixed. I then had 10 more made and issued them to Officers for testing. We tried them on the butts (ranges) and found them very accurate to 100 yards and am sure they would have been good at two hundred yards as well.'


    Obviously these weapons were totally different than the one originally pictured, and I would think that it is safe to assume that the modification was to the front end only. It does prove though, that such modifications were carried out to salvaged rifles. I've included a couple of interesting pictures found on the internet...

    Name:  tumblr_n21aaydYTK1tp4dyyo1_500.jpg
Views: 58
Size:  27.6 KBClick image for larger version. 

Name:	Обрез_7.62-мм_винто&#107.jpg 
Views:	8 
Size:	282.6 KB 
ID:	999464
    Books published to date... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack - Andersonstown'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

Similar Threads

  1. Lee Enfield Nr4 Mk2

    In World Firearms
    04-17-2010, 12:25 PM
  2. Lee Enfield bayonet

    In Bayonets and trench knives of the world
    01-06-2010, 11:16 PM
  3. Bren Mk1 & Lee Enfield No4

    In World Firearms
    01-05-2010, 12:53 PM
  4. 1898 Lee Enfield L.E.C 1

    In World Firearms
    02-03-2009, 06:49 AM
  5. 07-18-2008, 01:47 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •