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Cut Down Lee Enfield

Article about: I am still 100% certain that this was a RE modified weapon. The fact that the picture is taken in the Hill 60 museum where mining was at its peak would back this up. Sappers cut them down be

  1. #61

    Default Re: Cut Down Lee Enfield

    I think the Lee Enfield Story shows one.


  2. #62
    ?

    Default Re: Cut Down Lee Enfield

    Quote by m3bobby View Post
    I think the Lee Enfield Story shows one.
    Thanks Bobby

    I don't have that book but will look at it. I have been looking for an actual photograph of that system for a long time. Does it show both the mortar and the cut down Enfield?

  3. #63

    Default Re: Cut Down Lee Enfield

    forget whether or not it was allowed to cut down weapons by the powers that be and remember what type of war we are talking about, men were being killed with maces and clubs in close hand to hand combat! if i could of got my hands on a damaged rifle, cut it down and conceal it in my pocket for an extra weapon then i would have!! simple as that....

  4. #64

    Default Re: Cut Down Lee Enfield

    I cannot believe that a cut down .303 would be used as a handgun by anyone. The kickback would split your thumb web apart and mangle up your hand. I have used a .303 and even with a full stock, firing it one handed would not be recommended.
    On the other hand I have a universal Bren carrier with a 4 inch smoke discharger bracket. Originally the bracket was bolted to the outside of the hull and a cut down .303 rifle was the means of firing it, the trigger being operated by means of a bowden cable inside the carrier. The bracket was moved inside the carrier but the cutdown .303 was still used to fire it. There is an excellent thread with pictures on the MLU site. I know it appears that the cutdown .303 in this thread purports to be from WWI but I have my doubts. John.

  5. #65

    Default Re: Cut Down Lee Enfield

    yes, i totally understand your point, but desperate times may call for desperate measures, it may mangle your hand but as a last ditch resort of self defence this sure would be better than an oncoming mace or bayonet coming in your direction! im just saying sometimes we may judge items as not being practicle or ideal for a situation and dismiss them out of hand, my great grandfathers brother fought in the somme, he told my father that all types of every day items were fashioned into weapons, he fashioned a fighting nife from a barbed wire fence post for example.

  6. #66

  7. #67

    Default Re: Cut Down Lee Enfield

    Hello-I had contributed to this discussion last month but have since had another thought on the matter-it is possible that ammunition may have been deloaded to reduce the charge & thus recoil for a cut down-as a very short range weapon for use in tunnels or trenches this would be acceptable & the no. of rounds altered would be relatively small especially if you've already gone to the trouble of sawing off the rifle.

  8. #68

    Default Re: Cut Down Lee Enfield

    Quote by lithgow View Post
    Hello-I had contributed to this discussion last month but have since had another thought on the matter-it is possible that ammunition may have been deloaded to reduce the charge & thus recoil for a cut down-as a very short range weapon for use in tunnels or trenches this would be acceptable & the no. of rounds altered would be relatively small especially if you've already gone to the trouble of sawing off the rifle.
    i suppose you could pull the round out of the case and take out some of the cordite strips, but im still going with 410 shot gun shells to make it a trench shot gun for raiding. a cut down barrel would give you a good spred of shot at close range and 410 will fit straight into the existing 303 chamber without modifying the chamber

  9. #69

    Default Re: Cut Down Lee Enfield

    Why take the trouble of cutting down a rifle and reducing loads, if a revolver or an automatic pistol would be more practical?

    If no handguns would have been available, a mace or a knife would be a better choice for close quarter business. Using a "repeating pistol" such as a cut down rifle, actually makes it equal to a single shot for all practical purposes. There would hardly be time to operate the bolt in trench fighting.

    Give me a cutlass (klewang) anytime for this work, although I have no experience nor look forward to gaining any!

    Cheers,
    Emile

  10. #70

    Default Re: Cut Down Lee Enfield

    Certainly many different types of clubs, maces, daggers etc were used in trench fighting but as the old Russian saying goes 'When going to a knife fight bring an axe'-if you can start engaging the opposition before it gets to hand to hand then do so-hand guns in British service were mostly officers' weapons unlike German & French troops who could be issued various revolvers & auto pistols of many kinds & quality-as to .410 shotgun the ammunition was a colonial issue in India for various smoothbore versions of British rifles for less reliable local troops-it would be unlikely to turn up in France but I suppose it would be possible.

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