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Does anyone recognize this pistol?

Article about: I would appreciate help from anyone that might recognize or have a recommendation for identfying this pistol. The model indicates V.R. Tower 1869. It's a 6 shot percussion pistol that I've f

  1. #1
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    Default Does anyone recognize this pistol?

    I would appreciate help from anyone that might recognize or have a recommendation for identfying this pistol. The model indicates V.R. Tower 1869. It's a 6 shot percussion pistol that I've found here in Afghanistan. Very skeptical about weapons over here but I know there are some that are good finds. Anyone have knowledge about these types of pistols? Thanks Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2

    Default Re: Does anyone recognize this pistol?

    Its an olden day revolver, commonly referred to as a pepperbox

    Pepper-box - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    This type of weapon was popular in North America from 1830 until the American Civil War, but the concept was introduced much earlier, in the 15th century several single shot barrels were attached to a stock, being fired individually by means of a match.

    Around 1790 pepperboxes were built on the basis of flintlock systems, notably by Nock in England and "Segallas" in Belgium. These weapons, building on the success of the earlier two-barrel turnover[3] pistols, were fitted with three, four or seven barrels.[4] These early pepperboxes were hand-rotated.

    The invention of the percussion cap by Joshua Shaw, building on Alexander Forsyth's innovations, and the industrial revolution allowed pepperbox revolvers to be mass-produced, making them more affordable than the early handmade guns previously only seen in the hands of the rich. Examples of these early weapons are the English Budding (probably the first English percussion pepperbox), the Swedish Engholm and the American threebarrel Manhattan pistol.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Does anyone recognize this pistol?

    Quote by bihans View Post
    I would appreciate help from anyone that might recognize or have a recommendation for identfying this pistol. The model indicates V.R. Tower 1869. It's a 6 shot percussion pistol that I've found here in Afghanistan. Very skeptical about weapons over here but I know there are some that are good finds. Anyone have knowledge about these types of pistols? Thanks Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC07186.jpg 
Views:	310 
Size:	244.1 KB 
ID:	261509Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC07185.jpg 
Views:	1150 
Size:	254.3 KB 
ID:	261508Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC07188.jpg 
Views:	236 
Size:	246.0 KB 
ID:	261510
    I would be very sceptical of this gun, for three reasons:

    1. I have have never heard of the Tower of London producing this type of weapon (they may have of course), but 1860s/70s British Army issue handguns tended to be big calibre manstopping weapons
    2. The Queen Victoria crown seems lopsided and asymmetrical. It could be the photo, but real stampings of this type are from very well made dies.
    3. The construction of the multi-barrel looks like it was made from six metal tubes, welded onto a central tube. Real pepperbox pistol barrel assemblies were, i believe, fashioned from a single billet of metal.

    I would say it's a nice souvenir, but not a real antique gun.

    Rob

  4. #4

    Default Re: Does anyone recognize this pistol?

    Agreed. Not a martial weapon IMO, and '1869' is a rather late date for a pistol
    of this type to still be in production - advancements in firearm technology
    had improved quite drastically by this time..........
    Last edited by Walkwolf; 11-06-2011 at 07:33 PM.
    Regards,


    Steve.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Does anyone recognize this pistol?

    "Tower" is a well known, turn of the century (19th to 20 th), faker!
    |<
    Always looking for Belgian Congo stuff!
    cheers
    |<ris

  6. #6

    Default Re: Does anyone recognize this pistol?

    IT is a 100% fake pistol produced in the Khyber/Afghan region, probably no older than 10 years tops. This weapon was 80 years out of date by 1869, and pepperboxes were not issued to H.M. forces at any time, they were private purchase pieces.Also service issued pieces were never intricatly engraved like this piece, which is also in an Asian style, completely wrong.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

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