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Enfield Rifle No. 2 MKIV caliber .22 long rifle

Article about: does anyone have any more info on these rifles i found an article in that new military surplus collectors magazine about them and i think the idea of a full size Enfield chambered in .22 is

  1. #1

    Default Enfield Rifle No. 2 MKIV caliber .22 long rifle

    does anyone have any more info on these rifles i found an article in that new military surplus collectors magazine about them and i think the idea of a full size Enfield chambered in .22 is excellent.
    https://www.samcoglobal.com/1-enfield.html
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    It was standard practice to convert old/surplus LEs of various models to .22 LR trainers-gave the troops the weight and feel of using the standard combat rifle while utilising a cheap and easily controlled round to learn to shoot. My example, converted from a Lithgow made 1941 No.1 Mk III* to a 1947 No.2 Mk IV (bottom LE in pic).
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    are they more or less collectible then unconverted ones

  4. #4

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    .22 trainers are a collecting field themselves as all models of the .303 rifles from the Lee Metfords to No.4s were converted over an 80yr or more period, many still in use today for school cadets.

  5. #5
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    They are neat. With the cost of ammo today it is nice to fire rounds that don't cost a couple of dollars a shot. They make good squirrel rifles and they are fun to play with.

  6. #6

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    My own is a MkIV, converted from a 1917 BSA MkIII. It's only marked as a MkIV not No.2 MkIV as the No. format wasn't introduced until 1924 (I think it was 1924, could be wrong).

    You can find them marked as MkIV, No.2 MkIV or No.2 Mk4. The Indians made a No.2 Mk4 with a modified No.4 rifle sight at the rear.

    There were some made with sleeved barrels and some made with new .22 barrels. The bolt head is a .303 with the firing pin hole welded closed and a new off set hole drilled for the .22 firing pin plus a new extractor. The firing pin is a 2 part affair, the standard 303 pin was machined off at the collar and a new end was made and was free floating. The standard .303 mag was used as an empty case catcher by removing the spring and plate. The rear sight was retained but some had a extra line for 25 yds (I think). The original MkIII marking was linished off (Unusual for Brit and commonwealth arms which are normally barred out) and the new marking applied.

    If you google Rifleman.org.uk, in fact here you go, check this out, it's good reading.

    Lee-Enfield and other Training Rifles and Associated Equipment

  7. #7

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    how much are these trainers worth i mean do they go fairly high or more low end i enjoy firing .22s a lot and to get a former service rifle converted to that caliber would be excellent

  8. #8

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    If you want to buy one, look online or in your local gun shops to get an idea of what the asking price should be-not the sort of thing you can import easily-as mentioned previously, all types of LE rifles were converted and some are much rarer than others (mostly the older conversions) along with their condition and that will affect price-the basic SMLE Mk III or later No.4 conversions are the most common and should be the cheapest. They were still service rifles after conversion, some seeing 'home guard' type use during the 2 World Wars as an emergency measure as well as being used for military training. Here in Australia, prices are similar to the original .303 rifles (which ever type they were).

  9. #9

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    I got to shoot one of these with the RCAC ( Air Cadets ) back in the
    early 70's. Now, my eyesight isn't as good today, but I was a crack
    shot as a kid - I couldn't even hit paper at 50 yds with the one
    I was given to use. It's likely that the bore was ruined.

    I believe they sell in the range of what regular .303 versions
    are going for, perhaps a bit more.........
    Regards,


    Steve.

  10. #10
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    The Canadian purpose built 22lr Enfileld is the best of the lot with great sights.

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