Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17

European Weapons Directive

Article about: This might be a bit of a touchy subject as things to do with UK firearms laws/deactivation standards usually are because they are downright complicated and never give you a straight answer,

  1. #11

    Default Re: European Weapons Directive

    Anyone decided to import from Zib yet ? Russmilitary are selling deacts with no Birmingham proof certificates and they quote the following:

    This type of deactivated weapons does NOT require the UK proof marks, due to its compliance with European Weapons Directive 91/477 EEC Annex III (a): For the purposes of this Annex objects which corresponds to the definition of a 'firearm' shall not be included in that definition if they: (a) have been rendered permanently unfit for use by the application of technical procedures which are guaranteed by an official body or recognised by such a body.

  2. #12

    Default Re: European Weapons Directive

    The items sold by rusmilitary are "factory made" deacts: in other words these were never once fully functioning firearms, they were built new as deacts. Hence the difference.

    I still would not import any deact from abroad. I don't fancy eating prison food. Don't do anything on someone's say so here. Contact the authorities at HM Customs and tell them what you plan to do and ask for legal advice and get it all in writing.

    Cheers, Ade.
    Had good advice? Saved money? Why not become a Gold Club Member, just hit the green "Join WRF Club" tab at the top of the page and help support the forum!

  3. #13
    ?

    Default Re: European Weapons Directive

    Sounds great and here is why. If deacts from the continent would be availabe it will break the british dealers monopoly

    Will double what Andrian said about rusmilitary. We call those "dummy-gun" back home. They were build to meet the law in Russia the times when there were no law about deactivated weapon. Any real weapon, even dug up, no matter what have you done to deactivate it, could and would lead you to court. Those are factory made souvenirs, mostly from cheap metal.

  4. #14

    Default Re: European Weapons Directive

    Interesting info on the DSWUK website LINK

    The definition of a deactivated weapon is as follows:

    Altering of key components of the weapon in such a way that, as the 1988 Firearms (Amendment) Act states 'it has been rendered incapable of discharging any shot, bullet or other weapon and has consequently ceased to be a firearm within the meaning of the Act'.
    Legal deactivation does not necessarily involve submitting the weapon to a Proof House. Deactivation proofing provides 'evidential proof' that a weapon has been deactivated, BUT IT IS NOT A LEGAL REQUIREMENT FOR THE DEACTIVATION OF A FIREARM IN THIS COUNTRY. In short any deactivated weapon can be legal as long as it meets the requirements in point 1 above. A deactivated weapon can only be illegal if it can be shown (proved) that it is indeed capable of discharging a shot, bullet or other weapon. The Home Office Publication, Firearms Law Guidance to the Police quotes in section 2.3:

    2.3 Section 8 of the 1988 Act provides that, unless it can be shown otherwise, a firearm which has been deactivated to a standard approved by the Secretary of State so that it is incapable of discharging any shot bullet or other missile, is presumed not to be a firearm within the meaning of the principal Act and therefore not subject to control if it bears a mark approved by the Secretary of State for denoting that fact. The 1988 Act requires that one of the two Proof Houses or some other person designed by the Secretary of State has marked the firearm and certified in writing that it has been deactivated to the approved standard.

    Section 8 is an evidential provision and does not preclude the possibility that a firearm which has been deactivated in some other manner may also have ceased to be a firearm within the meaning of the principal Act.

    We also benefit from the European Weapons Directive 91/477 EEC which was subsumed into UK law by virtue of the 1992 Firearms Act. This directive forms the minimum standard of Firearms control throughout the EEC. It states:

    (a) For the Purposes of this Annex objects which correspond to the definition of a firearm shall not be included in that definition if they:

    have been rendered permanently unfit for use by the application of technical procedures which are guaranteed by an official body or recognised by such a body;"

    Therefore weapons proofed as inert or deactivated in other countries (by an official body) may be perfectly legal as long as they conform to the requirements of point 1 above and contain no functional component parts - see below.

    Accessories/Components

    Most weapon accessories can be sold legally. However, the law regarding component parts is more complex and open to some interpretation. The actual European Weapons Directive definition of a component part covers only the breech closing mechanism, the chamber and the barrel of the firearm. However, although it is not specifically stated in our firearms laws, Home Office guidance as well as rulings from past court proceedings would suggest that a component part be considered as any part required to fire a weapon. This would specifically include parts which have been manufactured uniquely for a particular weapon, e.g. bolt/extractor, bolt carrier, trigger mechanism/parts, firing pin, receiver, barrel, gas piston and charging handle. Parts not considered to be component parts would be stocks/grips, magazines, sights and springs.

    Please note that under the 1968 Firearms Act the definition of a firearm extends beyond simply a gun and its component parts to include:

    any accessory to any such weapon designed or adapted to diminish noise or flash caused by firing the weapon;..

    This would include flash eliminators and sound suppressors. It is particularly ridiculous that a small piece of metal on the end of a barrel (flash eliminator) could be considered a weapon in its own right, but it is! Remember however, that both of these components (being classed as firearms) can be owned legally if they have been deactivated in line with point 1 at the top of this page.

  5. #15

    Default Re: European Weapons Directive

    As I said before, do not do nothing on the strength of anything found here or on any other website. Contact the authorities concerned.

    Cheers, Ade.
    Had good advice? Saved money? Why not become a Gold Club Member, just hit the green "Join WRF Club" tab at the top of the page and help support the forum!

  6. #16

    Default Re: European Weapons Directive

    Any idea if someone in the USA can order a deact weapon for delivery to the USA?

  7. #17

    Default Re: European Weapons Directive

    100% NO to this, no question.

    Cheers, Ade.
    Had good advice? Saved money? Why not become a Gold Club Member, just hit the green "Join WRF Club" tab at the top of the page and help support the forum!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Short Sword -US, European...?

    In Attic & Old Barn Finds
    04-28-2013, 04:11 AM
  2. European dealers

    In Discussions
    11-12-2011, 07:19 PM
  3. WTB. Shortened European Bayonets

    In Other militaria: wanted
    10-31-2011, 08:04 PM
  4. Hitler's directive #1-Conduct of War

    In Photos - Papers - Propaganda of the Third Reich
    10-18-2010, 09:43 PM
  5. 06-05-2010, 01:47 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •