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Izarra 7,65

Article about: Found this one online. Deactivated and very cool. WW1 period. Cheers. Nuno

  1. #11

    Default Re: Izarra 7,65

    Hi Nuno,

    The pistol is, I think, a Spanish 'Ruby' type made for the French army under contract during WW1. Note the French word 'Feu' for fire next to the safety catch. These were issued to a lot of second line troops like clerks etc. but were also issued to stretcher bearers, tank crews and Mortar teams. I believe that they were manufactured between 1914 - 1921, but perhaps Bill Grist can give you more accurate info as I'm not 100% on this.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  2. #12

    Default Re: Izarra 7,65

    Thank you for the input Ned, all im missing is the time frame, i have no exact making date.
    But im leaning to early post war period.

  3. #13

    Default Re: Izarra 7,65

    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

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  4. #14

    Default Re: Izarra 7,65

    Very widespread pistols-the French had vast numbers and gave or sold many to 'new' countries after WW1 such as Poland and Finland-the Spanish gunmakers continued to produce them after the war as well-they were cheap and simple to make especially as the Spanish didn't bother with patent licences! Good find Nuno

  5. #15

    Default Re: Izarra 7,65

    Quote by lithgow View Post
    Very widespread pistols-the French had vast numbers and gave or sold many to 'new' countries after WW1 such as Poland and Finland-the Spanish gunmakers continued to produce them after the war as well-they were cheap and simple to make especially as the Spanish didn't bother with patent licences! Good find Nuno
    Thank you mate.
    Cheers.
    Nuno

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