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M1 Carbine serial number to look up info/history?

Article about: My dad gave me an M1 Carbine a number of years ago. He was mayor of my hometown at the time, and was able to get them through a police auction. He refinished several of them, redoing the sto

  1. #1

    Default M1 Carbine serial number to look up info/history?

    My dad gave me an M1 Carbine a number of years ago. He was mayor of my hometown at the time, and was able to get them through a police auction where I believe the police were able to buy the weapons from military surplus. He refinished several of them, redoing the stock (stained, lacquered) and re-bluing the metal parts, so it resembles a sporting rifle now more than the original military finish. He redid one for each of my brothers and I for Christmas. The rifle says it was made by the Inland Mfg. Division of General Motors and I think has a date of 9-44 on it. My dad said they were all full of sand when he opened them up, and had been banged up a bit. I think he gave $200 for them, which has to be a steal. I'll try to get some photos of it.

    I was wondering if it's possible to find out anything about the gun from the serial number? 5508960

    I would absolutely love to know if it was issued, where it's been etc.

    Thanks!!!!
    "Only a real risk tests the reality of a belief." - C.S. Lewis

  2. #2

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    I haven't looked at this rifle for some time now. I imagine historically he may have hurt it by refinishing it, but man is it a beautiful rifle like this. My dad really does good work on these.

    Here are some photos:

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    "Only a real risk tests the reality of a belief." - C.S. Lewis

  3. #3

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    Restoration of carbines is always a bad idea when you donít have the proper restoration supplies at hand. An unmolested carbine in any condition will be worth more in value. Your carbine is mid war. It has been re-arsenal. Bayonet lug added and adjustable sight. The correct finish should be oil and not gloss on the stock. . I also see from your pictures that a pot belly stock was added. Again a Korean War or later addition. It looks like a great shooter carbine. Just my observations as a collector of some 30 years.
    Thanks for showing it to us.

    John
    I specialize in M1 carbines and Lugers.

  4. #4

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    Side note on my above post.
    After the war a lot of police departments had no firearms to speak of. The war effort you know. So many state and local agencies were given firearms by the Government. I do know that our state Penitentiary still has 2 BARĒS in their inventory. I told them NOT to get rid of them as they are worth quite a lot now these days. The state of Florida had tons of carbines at one time. They are long since gone. Just a little history.

    John
    I specialize in M1 carbines and Lugers.

  5. #5

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    Hi John.

    Thanks for your info. I don't think my dad was concerned with collectability on these. I think he just wanted to restore some nice rifles to give to us as Christmas presents. I guess I can forgive him for that. They'll make nice heirlooms to pass on, and they're still pretty fun to fire.

    Can you clarifiy one term you used for me? What is "re-arsenal"?
    "Only a real risk tests the reality of a belief." - C.S. Lewis

  6. #6
    MAP
    MAP is offline
    ?

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    Quote by avenger View Post
    Hi John.

    Thanks for your info. I don't think my dad was concerned with collectability on these. I think he just wanted to restore some nice rifles to give to us as Christmas presents. I guess I can forgive him for that. They'll make nice heirlooms to pass on, and they're still pretty fun to fire.

    Can you clarifiy one term you used for me? What is "re-arsenal"?
    Re-arsenal is when the weapon after seeing use is in need of an overhall. Most M1 and Garands when back to the arsenal to be re-fitted and upgraded with newer or improved parts.

    As such, finding all original WWII M1 Carbines and Garands is very difficult.

    Regards,

    Michael
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  7. #7

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    Thanks Michael. That makes sense.
    "Only a real risk tests the reality of a belief." - C.S. Lewis

  8. #8
    MAP
    MAP is offline
    ?

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    Quote by avenger View Post
    Thanks Michael. That makes sense.
    Of course it made sense.....I said it!

    Just joking

    Michael
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  9. #9
    ?

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    There is no real way to tell anything about the carbine from serial number other than date of manufacture.
    Yes law enforcement everywhere used these things. Everyone from prisons, US Post Office, railroad guards, sheriff's and even Texas Rangers. Not to mention the German Police after the war.
    Don't sweat the stock. Your Dad meant well and 20 years ago no one wanted these carbines. I bought my first one in 1990 from a deputy sheriff for $100.
    If you feel like it you can pick up a original stock at any gun show for under a $100. I have several that I keep on hand. There is a fellow in Missouri that I can dig up his number for you that has all sorts of parts for military rifles.
    So just enjoy the rifle. Shoot it and remember you father.

  10. #10

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    Hi Popeye! Thanks for your reply.

    Honestly, the stock doesn't bother me, and I'm not a bit put off by the loss of collectability on the rifle. My dad redid the whole thing inside and out, and if you had no idea what it was and just looked at it like some rifle, you'd be amazed at how gorgeous it looks. My dad is very skilled with woodworking and refinishing guns, and this rifle is no exception. Even if it were worth nothing now, I'd still be proud to show it off.
    "Only a real risk tests the reality of a belief." - C.S. Lewis

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