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need help with firearm identification

Article about: The Japanese even had a training bayonet for these rifles as well... The Training rifle and training bayonet was a cottage industry program, designed to get everyone involved in the militari

  1. #31
    partisan42
    ?

    Default Re: need help with firearm identification

    Quote by Kilroy Was Here View Post
    I disagree, I think the trainers go for a bit more than $100 in todays market....even with the missing bolt.
    I am going to respectfully disagree. I worked for a number of years as a description writer at one of the top firearms auction houses in the U.S. Japanese training rifles came in fairly frequently and typically sold for between $40 and $100. This may not be the high end of retail that we see on internet auctions sites but I would say that this range is about accurate in respect to value. In my opinion the value is lower than actual Arisakas because you cannot shoot them and the majority of them are still considered a firearm under the government's definition (although many people do not realize this) and therefore require paperwork or a C&R.

    I am not bad mouthing Redrover's rifle or Japanese training rifles at all, I actually think they are pretty cool. There are a wide variety of styles to collect. I have a Japanese training rifle that is actually modeled on a Chinese Mauser. I got it complete with cleaning rod and original sewn-on canvas sling. I believe I paid $65 for it.

  2. #32

    Default Re: need help with firearm identification

    Quote by partisan42 View Post
    I am going to respectfully disagree. I worked for a number of years as a description writer at one of the top firearms auction houses in the U.S. Japanese training rifles came in fairly frequently and typically sold for between $40 and $100. This may not be the high end of retail that we see on internet auctions sites but I would say that this range is about accurate in respect to value. In my opinion the value is lower than actual Arisakas because you cannot shoot them and the majority of them are still considered a firearm under the government's definition (although many people do not realize this) and therefore require paperwork or a C&R.

    I am not bad mouthing Redrover's rifle or Japanese training rifles at all, I actually think they are pretty cool. There are a wide variety of styles to collect. I have a Japanese training rifle that is actually modeled on a Chinese Mauser. I got it complete with cleaning rod and original sewn-on canvas sling. I believe I paid $65 for it.

    OK, you are entitled to you opinions.
    I will agree that $100 is a bit too much for a bolt to complete the rifle, plus it will not be a matching bolt. But the rifle as it is now I think $150-175, maybe more if some collector has to have this variation.

    Things are worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it when you go to sell it. Redrover could run a 2 week auction on Gunbroker, and find out definitely what it is worth right now in the market. Things have slowed down with the economy a bit, but I still think more than $100....... even without the bolt.

    I have collected WW2 weapons for close to 40 years now, and I have guns like a US&S .45 that I paid $300 for, an M1A1 carbine I paid $450 for, a S&W 1917 for $100......the list goes on and on. I still have them.....and they have been very good investments also to say the least. The days of cheap WW2 guns is gone.......but there are finds to be made still.

    The key to what you say is "I worked for a number of years" ?
    Is this past tense?? How long ago was this, what auction house?

    I would buy Japanese trainers all day long at $40 -$100 if they came up for sale. There are advanced Japanese collectors who "just" collect training rifles. Not everybody buys a Japanese rifle to shoot it. (although I have shot both my t99's )


    Regards, Steve

  3. #33
    partisan42
    ?

    Default Re: need help with firearm identification

    Quote by Kilroy Was Here View Post
    OK, you are entitled to you opinions.
    I will agree that $100 is a bit too much for a bolt to complete the rifle, plus it will not be a matching bolt. But the rifle as it is now I think $150-175, maybe more if some collector has to have this variation.

    Things are worth whatever someone is willing to pay for it when you go to sell it. Redrover could run a 2 week auction on Gunbroker, and find out definitely what it is worth right now in the market. Things have slowed down with the economy a bit, but I still think more than $100....... even without the bolt.

    I have collected WW2 weapons for close to 40 years now, and I have guns like a US&S .45 that I paid $300 for, an M1A1 carbine I paid $450 for, a S&W 1917 for $100......the list goes on and on. I still have them.....and they have been very good investments also to say the least. The days of cheap WW2 guns is gone.......but there are finds to be made still.

    The key to what you say is "I worked for a number of years" ?
    Is this past tense?? How long ago was this, what auction house?

    I would buy Japanese trainers all day long at $40 -$100 if they came up for sale. There are advanced Japanese collectors who "just" collect training rifles. Not everybody buys a Japanese rifle to shoot it. (although I have shot both my t99's )


    Regards, Steve
    Hey Steve,

    Yeah, past tense a little less than two years ago I stopped working at Amoskeag Auction so I could go back to school and get my degree. I agree that not everybody buys a Japanese rifle (or any rifle) to shoot it, but shootability does add to the value of guns, especially those on the lower end of the price range (a 100 thousand dollar Colt Walker will not be effected by shootability).

    I think that for the most part you are right, the days of cheap WWII guns are gone but there are exceptions. Italian Carcanos and Soviet Mosin Nagants can still be found cheap. Even Arisakas have not yet gone the way of the K98 or Garand.

    I think we will just have to agree to disagree on this one. You may be right, an Arisaka trainer without a bolt might fetch $100 on gunbroker. People often pay high prices online. I guess then that the online market would be considered "the market" but I think plenty of people are of the opinion that the crazy prices we see on ebay, gunbroker, wherever are not reflective of the true current value of an item.

  4. #34
    WWII collector
    ?

    Default Re: need help with firearm identification

    Quote by blackheart0866 View Post
    DO A SIMPLE SEARCH YOUR SELF, AND QUIT WASTING OUR TIME.

    Brian..
    YOU DONT HAVE TO ****ING SHOUT!!!!

  5. #35

    Default Re: need help with firearm identification

    I would like for all responces and replys to the following quote stopped(Originally Posted by blackheart0866
    DO A SIMPLE SEARCH YOUR SELF, AND QUIT WASTING OUR TIME.

    Brian..) it was a honest mistake by one of our forum members. Stay on the sdubject of the Japanese training rifle.. I have responded to the improper post in question, and it is over....... BILL
    "As long as there are brave men and warriors the halls of Valhalla will never be silent or empty"

    In memory of my father William T. Grist December 26, 1920--September 10, 2009..
    901st. Ordnance H.A.M. North Africa, Italy, Southern France....ETO
    Also in memory of my mother Jane Kidd Grist Feb. 22, 1920-- September 27, 2009... WWll War bride May 1942...

  6. #36

    Default Re: need help with firearm identification

    And I apologize for my rudeness, i was having a really bad day, the VA did some stupid stuff that day, plus i had lost a package in the mail, the Post office lost it, and could not find it.

    SO, I'm sorry for my comment.

    Brian

  7. #37
    WWII collector
    ?

    Default Re: need help with firearm identification

    Quote by blackheart0866 View Post
    And I apologize for my rudeness, i was having a really bad day, the VA did some stupid stuff that day, plus i had lost a package in the mail, the Post office lost it, and could not find it.

    SO, I'm sorry for my comment.

    Brian
    my day was bad too, those fags at the post office lost my SKS that i ordered

  8. #38

    Default Re: need help with firearm identification

    They lost a box of 100 AR-15 magazines i ordered for some friends, and some 3 point slings also.

    Really bad day.

    They found them the next day, sitting in the back of the main window at the post office.

    Brian

  9. #39
    WWII collector
    ?

    Unhappy Re: need help with firearm identification

    Quote by blackheart0866 View Post
    They lost a box of 100 AR-15 magazines i ordered for some friends, and some 3 point slings also.

    Really bad day.

    They found them the next day, sitting in the back of the main window at the post office.

    Brian
    and i paid $250 for it!

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