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PTRS 14.5mm A/T rifle: Muzzle brake question?

Article about: Hi Guys, as most of you know, I own a PTRS. They are quite rare to find. Earlier this year I saw one in the Resistance Museum in Warsaw, Poland. It had a muzzle brake which differed from the

  1. #1

    Default PTRS 14.5mm A/T rifle: Muzzle brake question?

    Hi Guys, as most of you know, I own a PTRS. They are quite rare to find.

    Earlier this year I saw one in the Resistance Museum in Warsaw, Poland. It had a muzzle brake which differed from the usual circular design and was very similar to that found on the PTRD bolt action A/T rifle. I initially wondered if this was some kind of post war mod done by the Poles?????

    However, this week I encountered another PTRS with this same design of muzzle brake. It was in the collection of the MoD here in the UK. Much of the kit they hold are WW2 bringbacks. It now makes me wonder about the origins of this version. Can anyone shed any light on this for me?

    Cheers, Ade.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2

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    This is the usual version encountered.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #3

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    My guess is that it is a late war mod because by the looks of it the PTRD break looks to use less material. That and it almost looks cruder. I'm no expert on these but that's just what my guess is.

  4. #4

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    That is fair comment and something that had crossed my mind too. The gun I photographed was 44 dated.

    Cheers, Ade.
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  5. #5

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    Just found a pic of one with this muzzle brake in the Patton Musuem.


    Here is another in a rather nice bit of film:

    Russian PTRS 14.5mm anti tank rifle - YouTube
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  6. #6

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    Documentary Film in Russian. This one has the "conventional" muzzle brake :

    Арсенал ПТ*С - YouTube
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  7. #7

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    I agree with KreigMann, it's far easier to fabricate a few pieces of sheet metal and weld them together than machine a muzzle brake from a steel billet. One job is semi skilled whilst the other is skilled. At that stage of the war expediancy was a much required solution to production quota's.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  8. #8

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    Quote by big ned View Post
    I agree with KreigMann, it's far easier to fabricate a few pieces of sheet metal and weld them together than machine a muzzle brake from a steel billet. One job is semi skilled whilst the other is skilled. At that stage of the war expediancy was a much required solution to production quota's.

    Regards, Ned.
    Sounds logical!.....
    It's a wasted trip baby. Nobody said nothing about locking horns with no Tigers.



    I'm Spartacus, not really i'm Paul!...

  9. #9

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    Thanks for the comments Gents.

    Cheers, Ade.
    Had good advice? Saved money? Why not become a Gold Club Member, just hit the green "Join WRF Club" tab at the top of the page and help support the forum!

  10. #10

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    I go with the other guys Ade.

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