Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 30

some ww2 rifles

Article about: hi you also know that Johnson also work with stoner on the AR , if you see the bolt on a Johnson and the bolt of an AR there very close. also Johnson took a carbine and sleeve the barrel, to

  1. #11
    ?

    Default Re: some ww2 rifles

    Huge fan of the Johnson (LOL) rifle!
    The USMC liked it a LOT.

    (Well the M1 and Garand are nice as well of course).

    Are the rifles in firing condition (and have you fired them) or are you in a country, where they unfoortunately have to be deactivated?

  2. #12
    ?

    Default Re: some ww2 rifles

    Yes ,they are all in firing condition. And yes I also shoot them . once a year I break them out, and send a few rounds down range . that's what they were made for . beside who knows, how much long we will have that right. That word "DEACTIVATED" make me sick . that my government , your government does not trust it citizen . but I don't wont to get to political

  3. #13
    ?

    Default Re: some ww2 rifles

    Quote by rap57 View Post
    Yes ,they are all in firing condition. And yes I also shoot them . once a year I break them out, and send a few rounds down range . that's what they were made for . beside who knows, how much long we will have that right. That word "DEACTIVATED" make me sick . that my government , your government does not trust it citizen . but I don't wont to get to political
    I could not agree more with your statement.
    I like, that you get to fire some rounds from the old warhorses down range once a year.
    Having fired both the M1 and the Garand many times, I of course like those rifles.
    Never have shot the Johnson rifle though. Ive only read about it and noted that it was an excellent design, which the USMC liked but didnt get (in any great quantities).
    Thanks for showing us these fine rifles. Brightened my day.

  4. #14
    ?

    Default Re: some ww2 rifles

    M41 Johnson rifle I have never heard of that 1??? It would be nice to see more pictures of it!!!. Sounds interesting!!!.. Lovely weapons all of them.. thanks for showing . Cheers Terry.

  5. #15
    ?

    Default Re: some ww2 rifles

    Quote by Tango View Post
    M41 Johnson rifle I have never heard of that 1??? It would be nice to see more pictures of it!!!. Sounds interesting!!!.. Lovely weapons all of them.. thanks for showing . Cheers Terry.
    This might help.

    The M1941 rifle used the energy from recoil to operate the rifle. As the bullet and propellant gases moved down the barrel, they imparted a force on the bolt head that was locked to the barrel. The barrel, together with the bolt, moved a short distance rearward until the bullet left the barrel and pressure in the bore had dropped to safe levels. The barrel then stopped against a shoulder allowing the bolt carrier to continue rearward under the momentum imparted by the initial recoil stage. The rotating bolt, which had eight locking lugs, would then lock the bolt. Following, a cam arrangement then rotated and unlocked the bolt to continue the operating cycle.[1] One disadvantage of this design was its impact on the use of a bayonet, as the complex movements of the barrel would be subject to unacceptable stress when a bayonet thrust was used. The Johnson rifle utilized a unique 10-round rotary magazine and a two-piece stock, the weapon using the same 5 round stripper clips used by the M1903 Rifle.

    This system had some advantages over the M1 Rifle, including less perceived recoil and greater magazine capacity. Unfortunately, the Johnson's recoiling barrel mechanism resulted in excessive vertical shot dispersion that was never fully cured during its production life, and was prone to malfunction when a bayonet was attached to the reciprocating barrel. The Johnson also employed a number of small parts that were easily lost during field stripping. Partially because of lack of development, the M1941 was less rugged and reliable than the M1, though this was a matter of degree and was not a universal opinion among those that had used both weapons in combat.

    Prototype nicknames[edit]

    As was Johnson's practice, he gave all of his weapons a "pet" nickname:

    M1941 rifle Betsy
    M1941 light machine gun Emma
    M1947 auto carbine Daisy Mae
    For example, Johnson chris*tened his semi-automatic rifle Betsy and the Light Machine Gun Emma. A massive 20 mm aircraft cannon he developed for the Navy was called Bertha. Johnson referred to the Auto-Carbine as Daisy Mae. None of Johnson's memoirs or other writings reveals his inspiration for these nicknames, although at least a couple would seem obvious.

    Famed frontiersman Davy Crockett supposedly called his rifle Old Betsy, which may have led Mel*vin Johnson to give his first rifle the same moniker. The name "Emma" for the LMG was almost cer*tainly derived from the British military's use of the term Emma Gee during World War I to denote Machine Gun or "MG" (M=Emma; G=Gee). The 20 mm aircraft cannon was dubbed Bertha in a likely reference to Germany's massive howitzer of the First World War called Big Bertha (supposedly after Gustav Krupp's wife). One can speculate about the sleek, attractive Auto-Carbine's nickname of Daisy Mae, but the logical assumption is that it was inspired by the buxom girl of the same name fea*tured in the Li'l Abner comic strip popular at the time. One of the Auto-Carbine prototypes, presum*ably number S-3, had Daisy Mae the 3rd neatly stenciled on the right side of the buttstock.

    History[edit]

    Melvin Johnson campaigned heavily for the adoption of the Johnson rifle by the U.S. Army and other service branches. However, after limited testing, the U.S. Army rejected Johnson's rifle in favor of the M1 rifle developed by Springfield Armory.[2] The M1941 was ordered by the Netherlands for issue to the KNIL in the Dutch East Indies, only a few rifles were shipped to the Dutch East Indies before the Japanese invaded. At this time, the U.S. Marine Corps found itself in need of a modern fast-firing infantry rifle, and acquired some rifles from the Dutch East Indies shipment for issue to its Paramarine battalions then preparing to deploy for action in the Pacific theatre. By all accounts, the M1941 performed acceptably in combat with the Marines in the early days of the Pacific fighting.

    Despite repeated requests to adopt the rifle by the Marine Corps,[3] the Johnson rifle also lacked the support of US Army Ordnance, which had already invested considerable sums in the development of the M1 and its revised gas operating system, then just going into full production. Johnson was successful in selling small quantities of the M1941 Johnson Light Machine Gun to the U.S. armed forces, and this weapon was later used by both Para-Marines and the Army's First Special Service Force.[4]

    In late 1946, Argentina expressed an interest in Johnson's arms, and Johnson fabricated a prototype, the Model 1947 auto carbine, a semi automatic rifle variant of the light machine gun with the 10 round cylindrical magazine. While specific details are sketchy, it apparently bore little resemblance, but shared some features with the Johnson M1941 light machine gun. Argentina apparently declined to purchase any, and the M1947 auto carbine never went into production. In any event, the post-war years were not kind to the Johnson organisation. The entity filed for bankruptcy and was liquidated in early 1949.

    A notable example is the FMA VF-1 manufactured in Argentina.[5]

    The Johnson rifle was also used in the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion by the anti-Castro Brigade 2506.

    Because it was produced in relatively small quantities the Johnson rifle has become a highly sought-after collectible by World War II collectors looking to complete their collections.

    Users[edit]


    This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.

  6. #16
    ?

    Default Re: some ww2 rifles

    Cheers Samnev for the info..I always like to learn something new!!!.... Cheers Terry.

  7. #17
    ?

    Default Re: some ww2 rifles

    Quote by Tango View Post
    Cheers Samnev for the info..I always like to learn something new!!!.... Cheers Terry.
    Cheers Terry,
    Glad the info helped. I own the 1941 rifle as well as the 1941 LMG. The rifle is not particularly accurate compared to the Garand and the felt recoil seems to be greater with the Johnson. The LMG is somewhat clumsy due to the 25 round magazine that mounts perpendicular to rifle. It is also quite light so the recoil in 30-06 is stout.
    Cheers, Sam

  8. #18

    Default Re: some ww2 rifles

    Terry, if you want one theres one in the UK for sale if you have a very cool 4250 burning a hole in your pocket. Unfortunatly its been to the chop shop, I can see our American friends wincing in frustration.

  9. #19

    Default Re: some ww2 rifles

    Our armed forces ended up with a few of the Netherlands East Indies contract when Dutch forces withdrew to Australia after the fall of the East Indies (current Indonesia) in 1942-were briefly used for airfield guard use but the combination of a rare rifle with no spares and a non standard round .30-06 meant they were soon retired when other rifles were available. The bayo for it is a peculiar piece rather like a LE spike type-a spike blade and a mount that isn't a handle so it can't be used as a knife (with any ease anyway).

  10. #20

    Default Re: some ww2 rifles

    Thanks for the fine review and post Samnev. I have read articles concerning the Johnson and knew they numbers are limited but had forgotten production numbers. I realize our collectibles be it guns, helmets, knives, or other memorabilia is also a great investment if a collector chooses to sell down the road. t least the market seems pretty stable for now.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. My Rifles

    In Collections display
    06-16-2013, 03:15 PM
  2. Need Help! 2 rifles.

    In World Firearms
    12-14-2012, 07:35 PM
  3. Pre War Rifles - my Wz.29 rifle

    In Polish Armed Forces - Second Republic (Siły Zbrojne II Rzeczypospolitej Polskiej) 1918-1939
    05-24-2012, 02:33 AM
  4. Displaying rifles

    In Collections display
    08-05-2011, 10:13 PM
  5. Buying WW2 Rifles

    In World Firearms
    02-26-2011, 10:33 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •