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Soviet Infantry weapons collection

Article about: Hi Guys, I though that you might be interested to see some of my WW2 Soviet Infantry weapons? It is my ambition to try and obtain one of each weapon This is a long term project As I live in

  1. #181
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    That is a quite impressive collection Ade! To say the least



    Regards, Lars

  2. #182

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    Thanks Lars. As you know, there will be a new update to this thread in the next few weeks. Just awaiting a mag

    Cheers, Ade.
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  3. #183

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    Quote by Adrian Stevenson View Post
    Protivo Tankovoye Ruzhyo Degtyaryova.

    This PTRD is not mine but belongs to a comrade in our LH group and forum member "Bigbad"

    I often get to blank fire this one at events. We now use new custom made cases which are hand loaded.
    Hi Ade,

    You perhaps know that perfectly well already, but maybe someone did not noticed: the PTRD is a rare specimen of, hmm, how to put it, a 'half-semi-automatic' or "almost semi-automatic" class of small arms. In a nut shell, it is a single-shot semi-auto, or rather an artillery style semi-auto. In semi-automatic small arms in a classical sense, you have a weapon that uses energy of discharge and springs to unlock, extract, eject, then feed fresh round ouf of the magazine, and lock again for another shot. In artillery the semi-automatic action unlocks, extracts, ejects - and stops there. You have to feed another shell and hit the bolt release (in some cannons these are released by extractor automatically when the fresh shell hits the extractor with the rim of the case). Ditto for PTRD! Have you noticed that barrelled action is sliding on top of the stock tube with a heavy duty spring inside? To check that next time you handle it, put is stock first on the floor and pull down on the bbl - hard. Now on top of that spring casing sits a rhoboidal plate with a hole in the middle. It is actually the unlocking cam. When you pull the trigger, firing pin ignites the round, then the recoil pushes the barelled action backward, and bolt handle hits the sloping front of the said cam plate, and on recoil stroke the bolt handle slides upwards the cam, rotating the bolt until it is unlocked. At the top of the plate when the bullet is already far away from the muzzle and the pressure drops to safe level, the spring starts the barrel's counterstroke. Yet the bolt is free, and the inertia still pulls it back, while the extractor yanks the case out of the chamber, until it stops, thus ejecting the spent case. Now you have the mechanism reverted to the initial loading position: breech open, ready for chambering another round by hand, and closing the bolt (also manually) in preparation for the next shot. If you fire only blanks, it will never eject and open - not enough pressure/inertia/recoil forces, unless you restrict the bore. Without it, you'll have to cycle it completely by hand. I'm sure you have a stack of Soviet war films on your desk - please take a look at initial scenes of the Ballad of the Soldier (1959) and compare with the anti tank rifle scenes from They Fought For Motherland (1975). Just 16 years, and the Mosfilm armorers already forgot how the PTRD works... In Ballad you see Skvortsov firing the fully-operational PTRD which half-cycled automatically, he only drops shells and closes the bolt. Either these were blanks from a restricted bbl - or he was firing live ammunition By the time of They Fought already safety was a Tsar, so the guys are firing blanks and you see them cycling the gun by hand all the way, four-strokes-a-bang.
    Next time you handle the operational PTRD at the re-enactment (I do not know whether Bigbad's PTRD has moving parts) load a fired case, rest it on the butt and yank hard on the action downward - you'll see the interaction between unlocking cam and bolt handle, with bolt falling out and extracting the case. QED

  4. #184

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    Quote by Nige H View Post
    Some nice kit there chaps, I must say the SVT 40 looks a real bit of a hand full, also its very interesting to see the "En Bloc" clip for the anti tank rifle, which looks very much along the lines of the M1 Garand system.


    Nige.
    Yeah, Nige - I was about to ask Ade why he didn't post any photos of the clip, if he has several of them. Actually they are quite similar in shape to the Garand, but in Kingsize - about 4:1 or 5:1, they hold 5 rounds of 14.5 mm x 114, but they were never a discardable thing, like the Garand clip. They were issued at a ratio of 2 per gun (as per 1944 manual) and serialed to the gun. I've dug several PTRS firing positions at the Eastern Front battlefields, and used to have quite a few PTR artefacts - but only once I have encountered a clip not damaged. Splinter/bullet hit or crushed - yes, several - but intact (even if rusty - the comparison shot shows that actual clip) just once. The mechanism makes interesting things to the fired cases. Boy, it builds awe and respect to see fired cases mangled and chewed in the process - especially if you have ever handled a 14.5-mm case which is really big, sturdy, and built to last! During WW2 the 14.5 cases were brass, and so you can see parts of rims almost torn off by the extractor (mind you, the rim is 3 mm thick!) or caved in where the ejector contacted the rim...
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  5. #185

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    Quote by Scout View Post
    Firing it is a real eye opener; whilst having no problem hitting a target due to long sight radius, one really notices how short a distance there is from the backstrap to the trigger.
    Especially without the stock, that makes for akward shooting even with my average sized hands.

    I like them a lot. If it was good enough for Winston Churchill, its good enough for me.
    If your havent fired one, do.
    Well, firing it is not only an eyeopener - it might be a knucklebreaker if you are not prudent... The grip you show in this photos (thumb over the stock) is the surest way to have a swollen knuckle from the hammer bite with most palm sizes. At first I thought that it just with my XL paws, but then I witnessed it again and this guys palms were half my size. My case was made worse by the very nature of the Broomhandle I was firing - it was Astra 903 machine pistol. At ca. 1200 rpm it fired 5-6 shots before I realized somethings is wrong. And it was - the thumb knuckle started to swell right away, and when it finally stopped, I was unable to close the fist and hold a pen for a week. Nothing broken, but painful enough to make me rememeber to fold the thumb away at the side ever after. And then I bought 'Live Firing German Machineguns of WW2" by Robert Bruce and saw that SS trooper firing with thumb folded by the side I knew at once the guys is a practic, not just a photo doll!

  6. #186

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    Thanks for the comments. I have seen the films you mentioned and noticed the same thing!

    We often demo the PTRD at events to show the action.

    I do have several clips of PTRS ammo too.

    I love anti tank rifles.

    Cheers, Ade.
    Had good advice? Saved money? Why not become a Gold Club Member, just hit the green "Join WRF Club" tab at the top of the page and help support the forum!

  7. #187
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    Quote by Visniewski View Post
    Well, firing it is not only an eyeopener - it might be a knucklebreaker if you are not prudent... The grip you show in this photos (thumb over the stock) is the surest way to have a swollen knuckle from the hammer bite with most palm sizes. At first I thought that it just with my XL paws, but then I witnessed it again and this guys palms were half my size. My case was made worse by the very nature of the Broomhandle I was firing - it was Astra 903 machine pistol. At ca. 1200 rpm it fired 5-6 shots before I realized somethings is wrong. And it was - the thumb knuckle started to swell right away, and when it finally stopped, I was unable to close the fist and hold a pen for a week. Nothing broken, but painful enough to make me rememeber to fold the thumb away at the side ever after. And then I bought 'Live Firing German Machineguns of WW2" by Robert Bruce and saw that SS trooper firing with thumb folded by the side I knew at once the guys is a practic, not just a photo doll!
    To each his own

    As the C-96 is a favourite of mine, I make a point of handling and shooting as many types as I can.

    With my average size hand the conventional handhold was never a problem with the type C-96 variations. Ive shot quite a few rounds through this type of gun.

    Ive shot a lot of rounds through many types of guns and the only ones to really leave a mark were a Lathi. Safety lever drew blood.

    A Swiss P-210 hammer bit me once. One of the guns through which Ive shot the most rounds apart from the 1911 (the latter with which Ive never had any problms and which remains one of my favourite gun designs. John Moses was a genius!)

  8. #188

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    Sure thing, Scout, sure thing. But I have palms - it seems - a bit above average size, and many pistols leave marks on them. But I don't mind a good pistol leave me a nice hickey for a souvenir But that damned Astra beating was really out of the way, the only time in my over 30 years of shooting anything shootable, when I actually got hurt shooting.

    Good shooting!
    Leszek

  9. #189
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    A 'Schnellfeuer' would be fun to shoot. I wouldnt mind a bit of hammer bite, if I could get to shoot one
    I guess the only option would be to hunt one down in the US at some point. Maybe one will turn up at a Knob Creek shootout.

  10. #190

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    Hi Guys, I have new update for you as I have added a new item to my Soviet weapons collection.

    Here we have a DT tank machine gun, designed in 1929 by Vasily Degtyaryov, the Дегтярёва танковый, Degtyaryova Tankovy was used on most Soviet tanks during WW2 as a hull machine gun or co axial MG or AA MG. Most well known of course as being fitted to the T34.

    My example is dated 1944 and is a late production version of the original DT. The gun is basically the DP28 reciever but modified for use in a vehicle. By mid 1944 a new modernised version, the "DTM" was going into production. The DTM followed the Infantry DPM of 1944.

    This one has had a long service life and after use by the Red Army was supplied to the Czech Army. Here it was rebuilt in the 1950's and had a few improvements made to it. The Czech's added a grip safety, and in line with post war Russian practise added the new modified 1945r pattern sight which allowed a telescope to be fitted. It is hard to find a gun today without the 1945r pattern sight in place. The original sight can now flip down to clear the scope. The scope was clamped into this ring mount. The scope would also have a large rubber facepeice. It fitted into the ball mount in the hull or turret and could be quickly released by turning to one side and releasing a handle. I have tried it in my friend's T34 tank and it works fine. The gun was designed to be used outside the vehicle should the need arise. So it could be fitted with a quick release bipod for ground use, which has an integral foresight and this is now high on my shopping list, as is a scope and pad.

    The shoulder stock can be adjusted for length and has a flip over support to create a stable firm grip into the shoulder, which is useful inside a vehicle bumping around over rough ground.

    The magazine has a high 60 round capacity (the Infantry DP only has 47 rounds) and fires the conventional 7.62mm x 54 Russian cartridge. This made the gun popular with anyone who could get their hands on them due to the handy size and large mag. 500rpm was the cyclic rate. The magazine can be released by the large triangular catch on top of the reciever behind the sight. Again a post war improvement added to most guns seen today. Pushing either left or right will release the mag.

    The original Soviet markings can be seen on the rear of the reciever and the left side. On the right can be seen the newer Czech markings and new serial number which it got after rebuild.

    Cheers, Ade.
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