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Type 38 Arisaka. From trash heap to the firing line!

Article about: A exellent testament to 0000 steel wool and lot's of oil. Nice job in your restoration Joe Thanks Burt

  1. #11

    Default Re: Type 38 Arisaka. From trash heap to the firing line!

    A exellent testament to 0000 steel wool and lot's of oil. Nice job in your restoration Joe

    Thanks

    Burt
    Happiness is a belt fed weapon

  2. #12
    ?

    Default Re: Type 38 Arisaka. From trash heap to the firing line!

    Nice to see the old rifle getting shot after what i bet was a long hiatus.
    You mentioned having a Carcano rifle (nice to see an American not calling it a Mannlicher-Carcano for once BTW).
    You could say, that there is a special kinship between your two rifles; Arisaka worked together with Carcano in making rifles for Japanese troops. The Type I Carcano was produced for Japan.
    Why is your Carcano rifle special - was it used in Dallas?

  3. #13

    Default Re: Type 38 Arisaka. From trash heap to the firing line!

    Thanks for the kind words, gentlemen!

    Quote by milmuseum View Post
    A exellent testament to 0000 steel wool and lot's of oil. Nice job in your restoration Joe

    Thanks

    Burt
    Thanks, Burt! I will admit that I was scared to death to use any type of steel wool at first. I had no experience with 0000 and I was surprised to see how fine it is. While using the 0000 soaked in CLP, the tiniest bit of pressure made the rust come off so easily. I would wait for things to get "muddy", then wipe away the loose rust with a paper towel and continue. It took no time at all! I was really lucky in that the magazine, bore, bolt, rifling, and just in general any part of the rifle covered/ protected by the wood furniture was in near mint condition. I brought the rifle to a local gun smith before i tried to restore it and he was shocked by how good of condition the internals are in and how strong the rifling is.

    Quote by Scout View Post
    Nice to see the old rifle getting shot after what i bet was a long hiatus.
    You mentioned having a Carcano rifle (nice to see an American not calling it a Mannlicher-Carcano for once BTW).
    You could say, that there is a special kinship between your two rifles; Arisaka worked together with Carcano in making rifles for Japanese troops. The Type I Carcano was produced for Japan.
    Why is your Carcano rifle special - was it used in Dallas?
    Thanks for the kind words, Scout! I'd never call it a Mannlicher-Carcano... to be exact, my rifle is a Carcano Mod. 91/28 Moschetto T.S. (special troop) made by Beretta in Gardone, Italy and assembled at the arsenal in Terni, Italy.

    I originally set out to have one rifle from each of the major combatants in WWII. I asked my local gunsmith to keep an eye out for a Carcano rifle for me and one day he called and said he had one for cheap. It was around Valentine's Day, so I asked my gf to buy it for me.

    I posted a picture of it online, and an expert said he did not recognize the markings on it... He did additional research and found out that my Carcano was made using pre WWI steel from Krupp in Germany. Since Italy and Germany were on opposing sides during that conflict, the steel was withheld until after the war and then used to make Carcano carbine rifles. The expert said that my rifle is the only one he knows to exist with the "K" for Krupp marking. He asked me for a picture to include in the book he is writing.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here is a vid of me shooting the Carcano:

  4. #14

    Default Re: Type 38 Arisaka. From trash heap to the firing line!

    Well done Joe. Got to be proud of the work done, plus the fact your were most likely the first to fire it since it was last fired in anger. Knowing it will be around for years to come is great isn't it.

    Cheers
    Jason

  5. #15

    Default Re: Type 38 Arisaka. From trash heap to the firing line!

    Quote by VolksJager View Post
    Well done Joe. Got to be proud of the work done, plus the fact your were most likely the first to fire it since it was last fired in anger. Knowing it will be around for years to come is great isn't it.

    Cheers
    Jason
    It really does feel great, thanks!

  6. #16

    Default Re: Type 38 Arisaka. From trash heap to the firing line!

    Hi Joe,
    Thanks for showing the rifles, you done a great job on the restoration and it looks great now, and shoots well
    another fine rifle saved for the future.
    dave.

  7. #17

    Default Re: Type 38 Arisaka. From trash heap to the firing line!

    Thanks, Dave!

  8. #18
    ?

    Default Re: Type 38 Arisaka. From trash heap to the firing line!

    good restoration Joe. just goes to show what a little bit of effort and care can do. it looks great now! i have an old carcano too. same model and date year as the one that shot JFK. i'm still not sure how to think about that, so usually i just dont.
    andrew

  9. #19

    Default Re: Type 38 Arisaka. From trash heap to the firing line!

    Thanks, Andrew! If I could go back and re-do the restoration, I would apply less pressure while scrubbing with the 0000 steel wool and take the whole going even slower. I did alrighty, but there still are a few tiny scratches where I was a little over-zealous.

    No need to feel un-easy about your Carcano. As the saying goes: "Guns don't kill people, people kill people." Appreciate your rifle for what it is, a piece of Italian history.

  10. #20
    ?

    Default Re: Type 38 Arisaka. From trash heap to the firing line!

    I told you guys about the steel wool, but you juuuust wouldnt listen Always start with an oil-soaked soft rag, then softly with a Brillo Pad/ScotchBrite, then advance from there.
    I agree about the other Carcano rifle; indeed no need to feel uneasy, its just a rifle. Its not like its THE rifle, which was used on the 22. november 1963. There is no connection there apart from the rifle being the same model. Just be happy you got it and shoot it once in a while.

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