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U.S. Civil War small arms.

Article about: mr. dirt thanks very much for your kind words...it is a very interesting collecting period....lots of interesting history...not just of Militaria. You have had the good fortune of having bee

  1. #1
    drm2m
    ?

    Default U.S. Civil War small arms.

    I am not sure whether this is appropriate on this forum....if not please delete it.


    Model 1860 Colt Army revolver (early 1863)...Model 1858 New Model Remington revolver.











    Inspector's acceptance cartouche on the left grip of the Remington , "OWA", for Orville W. Ainsworth.( U.S. Government Inspector for many different arms, 1831-1870)


























    Model 1850 Foot Officers sword that is perhaps relevant to the officiers that carried these pistols.














    David

  2. #2

    Default Re: U.S. Civil War small arms.

    Very nice Civil War Weapons....BILL
    "As long as there are brave men and warriors the halls of Valhalla will never be silent or empty"

    In memory of my father William T. Grist December 26, 1920--September 10, 2009..
    901st. Ordnance H.A.M. North Africa, Italy, Southern France....ETO
    Also in memory of my mother Jane Kidd Grist Feb. 22, 1920-- September 27, 2009... WWll War bride May 1942...

  3. #3
    drm2m
    ?

    Default Re: U.S. Civil War small arms.

    Thanks Bill,

    I really started my collecting with CW stuff...probably not
    the best idea for a Canadian....there was a time when
    nice pieces were available where I live....less now....so
    I branched off into other collecting themes. (WWII etc.)

    For they that may be interested?

    I will post photos of some of my other Civil War and
    Indian War pieces...the Indian War pieces were used
    during the Civil war and converted after the war
    i.e. Sharps and Spencer carbines in 1867.

    Two other C.W. martial revolvers.

    Model 1851 Colt Navy..manufactured in 1857..U.S. marked
    on the frame an shows "M M" inspectors cartouche
    on the left grip panel. (M. Moulton)
    No remaining finish but clear markings on this revolver.

    These martially marked 51 navies are increasingly difficult to find.














    Model 1858 DA Starr Army revolver.











    Inspectors cartouche.




    David

  4. #4
    drm2m
    ?

    Default Re: U.S. Civil War small arms.

    General George Custer holding either a Model 1860 Colt revolver
    or a 51 Navy revolver.



    Three CW carbines.

    (Top to bottom-Spencer,Smith,Sharps.)

    The Spencer and Sharps were converted in 1867 for use during the Indian War period....they both have their CW period inspection markings.




    Spencer carbine. (Stabler cut-off added to restrict magazine feed.)










    Sharps carbine. (Converted to .50-70 cal. center fire cartridge.)












    Smith carbine. (Original C.W. percussion model.)










    David

  5. #5

    Default Re: U.S. Civil War small arms.

    Sweet weapons David I like the Case color on the Sharps carbine receiver...... beautiful

  6. #6
    drm2m
    ?

    Default Re: U.S. Civil War small arms.

    Thanks Jason....the Sharps carbine shown above is in pretty decent condition.


    A few other U.S. arms are shown below.

    Model 1842 smooth bore .69 cal. musket used by both sides early in the war.
    Manufactured at Harpers Ferry Armoury with an early 1843 lock plate date.














    U.S Bayonet Model 1835 in a Regulation Pattern of 1839 scabbard.
    This is the correct bayonet for the U.S. Model 1842 Musket, with a correct early scabbard.






    Model 1841 Rifle. (.a.k.a. Mississippi rifle)

    E. Whitney contract, lock plate dated 1848.









    Model 1855 Second Type saber bayonet and scabbard marked PB/P on the ricasso.










    Model 1861 rifled musket-lock plate dated 1863.
    Contract manufactured by Wm MUIR & CO









    Two Model 1855 socket bayonets Type 1 and Type 2 for the Model 1861 and certain other .58 caliber rifled muskets.





    PATTERN 1853 ENFIELD RIFLED MUSKET…lock plate dated 1861.








    The "24" on the barrel indicates the guns bore size, which is .58 caliber rather than the standard "25 bore" or British .577.





    This gun "might" have been a CS central government purchase. The engraved number on the butt plate tang 1121 is the "control number."





    David

  7. #7

    Default Re: U.S. Civil War small arms.

    Dave, Again wonderful weapons...You have a super nice collection....It would be the envy of any Civil War Or Indian War Collector here in the US. Thanks for posting and preserving such excellent conditon weapons........BILL
    "As long as there are brave men and warriors the halls of Valhalla will never be silent or empty"

    In memory of my father William T. Grist December 26, 1920--September 10, 2009..
    901st. Ordnance H.A.M. North Africa, Italy, Southern France....ETO
    Also in memory of my mother Jane Kidd Grist Feb. 22, 1920-- September 27, 2009... WWll War bride May 1942...

  8. #8
    drm2m
    ?

    Default Re: U.S. Civil War small arms.

    Thanks again for your comments Bill.

    It has been a bit of a lonely collecting exercise where I live...there is rarely anything at the local gun show that fits in this CW collecting period.

    I know one other local collector that has a serious interest in the CW and Indian War period....he has many "very special" pieces.....we have done some business together over the years.

    I guess that is why I expanded the scope of my collecting into a later time period.

    As Canada was active early in WWI and WWII.....it probably made sense to branch out.

    David



    This is not a firearm...but it is a rather nice piece.


    The Dahlgren knife bayonet... (named after Captain John A. Dahlgren, U.S. Navy)... one of two bayonets associated with the Whitney Model 1861 Percussion Navy ("Plymouth") .69 caliber Rifle.

    The Whitney "Plymouth" rifle, named after the U.S.S. PLYMOUTH, a naval ordnance testing ship which had been built under Dahlgren's supervision, has the distinction of being the only U.S. contract arm to be originally rifled in .69 caliber.

    RAdm. John A. Dahlgren.












    Markings:
    On one side –1864 U. S. N. D.R. (Navy inspector Daniel Reynolds)
    Other side-- AMES MFG CO /
    CHICOPEE MASS

    DR script initials on the hilt.
























    The first Knife Bladed bayonet is considered to be the Model 1861 for the Plymouth / Whitneyville rifle. It is perhaps better known by its nickname the Dahlgren Bowie Bayonet, named for it inventor Admiral John A. Dahlgren. Many articles have been written about the Dahlgren bayonet but what is most intriguing are the actual letters from the Admiral himself regarding its design and use. As we know the basic use of a bayonet is mounted to the end of a rifle or musket. To Dahlgren's thinking this is not the proper use of his newly invented arm. It should be known that Admiral Dahlgren was in command of several Navy ships and knew first hand what close quarters fighting was about. With this in mind perhaps we can relate to the admirals thought when he wrote that the bayonet was best used in the hand not mounted on the end of the rifle it was designed for. It is also interesting to note that the 1861 rifle already had a sword bayonet designed for it at the time of Dahlgren's invention of the new bayonet. In Dahlgren's own words he called it the "most useless thing in the world except at the end of a musket." Perhaps this explains why most Dahlgren bayonets do NOT fit the Model 1861 rifle. They were meant to but they were also designed to be used as a close quarters fighting weapon in a sailors or marines hand. The Admiral invented a bayonet because a knife would not be sanctioned by the Ordnance Board. But being the clever fellow he was the bayonet did not really have to fit the rifle either.


    Unfortunately I do not own the rifle that this bayonet was designed for. (Yet)

    David

  9. #9

    Default Re: U.S. Civil War small arms.

    Hi David, not a subject I know anything about, but it was a real treat to see them. The sheer quality of manufacture just shines through. Fantastic stuff.

    Cheers, Ade.

  10. #10

    Default Re: U.S. Civil War small arms.

    David,

    My compliments on your collecting skills and your photography. Others should take note of the use of the Flourescent light as both a soft source and a linear source (great for long objects) but rememver that they also come in round sizes as well.

    Being a Yankee by birth, and a Southerner by education and raising up, I can appreciate the preservation and research you have performed through your collection. Having spent by boyhood peering through the thick glass of the museum display cases at these and other relics, seeing them again through your fine photopgraphy is a real joy!

    Kudos to you, Sir!

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