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WWII Walther PP/PPK 7.65 stainless

Article about: by big ned Vet's often had their bring back firearms electro-plated to add a bit of bling. Maybe that's the case here. Regards, Ned. Following my earlier comment, here's a couple of examples

  1. #1

    Default WWII Walther PP/PPK 7.65 stainless

    Hello Anyone/Everyone,
    New to the forum. I am researching an old friends WWII stainless steel Walther PP/PPK 7.65 (I think its a PP). There is an extra clip with ammo, holster with accompanying war documents. The weapon was given to him by an old WWII veteran (now deceased). The weapon was captured during the Battle of the Bulge. The weapon has all the German military stampings on frame and barrel. Serial Numbers (356215P) match. There is a US Military possession certificate issued to the vet and accompanying US Customs declaration document when he returned from WWII. I am interested in whether there are German records of individuals to whom particular weapons were issued. Also, whether or not the weapon is rare or common. I love learning the stories of vets and hope this one is unusual. I will try to discover the vets unit, if possible. I am attempting to Attach some of the photo's and having a hard time. Files are JPEG and approx. 4M each. Any help welcome.

    TIA
    Dune

  2. #2

    Default Re: WWII Walther PP/PPK 7.65 stainless

    Dune

    Ii think your PP was made in 1944 according to this chart

    Pistolen der deutschen Wehrmacht

    You can see more about the PP here

    Pistols of the German Wehrmacht

    Not sure about the "stainless steel" you mention. As far as I am aware these pistols were finished in high polished blue or a dull grey finish later in the war.

    Finding out who the pistol was issued to is an impossible task. Records were kept but the chances of finding them now are slim.
    Hope that helps you a little.

    Regards

    Richie

  3. #3

    Default Re: WWII Walther PP/PPK 7.65 stainless

    Hi Richie,
    Thanks for info. I'm trying to post photo's with no luck. About 4M apiece. Are they too large for website? I'm on laptop. Maybe I'll try PC Later. As far as stainless issue, the weapon is definately stainless steel, not nickel. From what I am learning, it must have been possessed by an officer. Maybe. The certificate of possession was issued to the vet in Sep 45 from 518th MP Bn. I am researching that at present.

    dune

  4. #4

    Default Re: WWII Walther PP/PPK 7.65 stainless

    A Stainless Steel War-time PPK?? From the serial number, it indicates a 1944 manufacture, however, Stainless PPK's were not made until the mid 1980's, and then under license in the US. There Was a limited number of PPK's made with what is referred to a "Dural" frame, which was, basically, aluminum."Dural=Duraluminum" Does a magnet stick to yours? If yours Is a Dural frame, it is definitely more rarer than your average PPK and, of course, worth abit more too!
    Last edited by Wagriff; 06-06-2012 at 01:14 AM.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  5. #5

    Default Re: WWII Walther PP/PPK 7.65 stainless

    Vet's often had their bring back firearms electro-plated to add a bit of bling. Maybe that's the case here.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  6. #6

    Default Re: WWII Walther PP/PPK 7.65 stainless

    Hello Wagriff,
    Yes, definately steel. I just tested it with a magnet. The serial number has P suffix. I was just able to put one photo in compressed zip file. Can you see it?

    dune

  7. #7

    Default Re: WWII Walther PP/PPK 7.65 stainless

    Hello Dune, Not the answer you're hoping to hear, I know, but under magnification, it looks like it's been plated. The finish is not equal and smooth everywhere. Like I said, they definitely did Not make a stainless Walther until the 1980's, and then, only in the US under contract and this one is for certain a 1944 manufacture. From the appearance of the wear pattern, though, it may even have Possibly been a period plating-perhaps by the original owner himself-probably, as you said, an officer. A very nice Walther, in any case-especially with the bring-back papers.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

  8. #8

    Default Re: WWII Walther PP/PPK 7.65 stainless

    Im with you on this one Wagriff. never heard of stainless pistols back then on Walthers. If someone had this plated after to enhance the appearance they sure destroyed value concerning collectibility.

  9. #9

    Default Re: WWII Walther PP/PPK 7.65 stainless

    Wagriff,
    Thanks again. I really can't tell if it's plated. I owned a 1911 .45 that came back from WWII that had been chrome plated that looks completely different than this Walther. Maybe they stripped the bluing on this Walther (that's what it looks like to me). I have not found where any of them were manufactured SS. It has not been cleaned from back then and I wondered if I should attempt to disassemble the weapon and clean it. Are there any chemical cleaners I should not use on this thing? I learned that the 518th MP Bn was stationed in Chaudfontaine, Belgium in 1945, so that much is confirmed. So far, I can't find the vet's unit, as most of the sites are scams to get subscriptions. Any Idea's??? Maybe a military museum.

    dune

  10. #10

    Default Re: WWII Walther PP/PPK 7.65 stainless

    Hello Dune, No special oils or chemicals are needed to clean your Walther without harm. I would suggest simply using Hoppes #9 Solvent to clean the bore after wire brushing with a bore brush until it's clear and shiny again and then apply a light wiping of Remington Gun Oil on the rest. It should be fine.
    William

    "Much that once was, is lost. For none now live who remember it."

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