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Swedish M37 helmets

Article about: Good Morning to all, I want to show you my little collection of Swedish M37 helmets, I'm not a great expert on these helmets, but it is a model that I like a lot and I consider it very moder

  1. #1

    Default Swedish M37 helmets

    Good Morning to all,
    I want to show you my little collection of Swedish M37 helmets, I'm not a great expert on these helmets, but it is a model that I like a lot and I consider it very modern for the era in which it was developed.
    I take this opportunity to ask it you can date them from the marks on the shell, or by other details.
    Every opinion is welcome and I thank you in advance.

    Greetings
    Roberto

    Swedish M37 helmets

    1)-M37
    Swedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmets

    2)-M37
    Swedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmets

    3)-M37
    Swedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmets

    4)-M37/62
    Swedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmets

  2. #2

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    I do not know of any way to precisely date these helmets, as so far as I know the only markings within are acceptance/size marks. But there are three variants, so you can date them roughly by that. The original is the one with leather pads and chinstrap, the second version (introduced from 1962) has a German-made Schuberth suspension held from a fitting in the crown of the helmet and fabric chinstraps (you have this), and the third, introduced from 1970, has a different Schuberth liner which has no central attachment but fits into plastic attachments rivetted to the front and back of the inside of the helmet. It also has fabric straps.

    The best illustrations of all these are on Joseba at Pagina nueva 1

    I have an idea that there is actually a fourth type - which comes between the 37/62 and 37/70 - with a variation of the second liner, but I can't seem to find anything to prove that at the moment. I may be completely wrong!

  3. #3

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    Many Thanks, Greg
    good information and very detailed!!

    Roberto

  4. #4

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    nice grouping roberto and well photographed mine is the latter model ,unfortunately the decals have been scrubbed for its use with the latvian army swedish model 1937/65

  5. #5

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    Quote by James C View Post
    nice grouping roberto and well photographed mine is the latter model ,unfortunately the decals have been scrubbed for its use with the latvian army swedish model 1937/65
    Thanks, James
    I saw your M37, actually the decals appears deliberately abraded; I know that over at Latvian Army, this model has been used also by Lithuanian troops in the 90's.

    Cheers
    Roberto

  6. #6

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    Well, I've only gone and done it....I've joined the ol' M37/62 Club too....so thought I'd post pics into a very fine and totally suitable and appropriate existing thread on the same topic (HINT HINT!!!)

    Anyway, it's said to be a Lithuanian-used version which would figure as the name inside comes up as Lithuanian (thanks Sherlock Pickersgill for that one) and the cover appears to match their Woodland copy (thanks Mr Pedia). It's not a mint example and I'm unable to get the cover off to see if there's a badge as the cover itself is actually sewn to the strap...indeed, it would appear to be stitching which is holding the cover on. There's a stamp right on the edge of the shell just under the cover....there looks like a 7 or a 4 and some rounded figures there...but that cover's staying put so I guess I'll never know. The strap's been changed to include a central Veclro'd section....would love to know if that's been done by a Dad for his kids or if it was a Squaddie-isation....do we have any ex-Lithuanian army folk here?

    Anyway...I don't often dip into the non-MkII Steelie market nowadays...in fact I only originally bought this one as a display medium for the strange Swedish cover-net-peaked thingy....but now I have it it's gonna stay Lith and proud (if that's what it actually is).

    I respectfully await your confirmation / corrections.

    Swedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmetsSwedish M37 helmets



    I apologise for the absence of tablecloths, keyboards, garden decking, pot plants, birds, bikes, paintings, cats, dogs, gardens, Veloceraptors, bottles, lighters, clocks, spectacles and dirty thumb-nails etc...I took the pics during a snow storm :-)



    ...one piece of A1 size thin white card....1.20.....pushed along the floor or table top 'till it's half up a wall...item plonked on flat bit.....natural curve removes corners....Bob's ya Uncle, Fanny's ya Aunt.....


    Some folk say I'm becoming a grumpy ol' man.

  7. #7

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    A good acquisition Ade,
    I knew that in the 1990s some Lithuanian special forces units used this type of helmet, but I had not really seen one yet.
    The name written inside would confirm his Lithuan provenance, hard to say when the chinstrap was modified.
    I really like his lived cover, definitely a piece with great character.

    Regards
    Roberto

  8. #8

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    The Finnish army also used some of these Swedish made helmets in ww2

  9. #9

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    ah...but how does one tell a Finnish Swedish from a Lithuanian Swedish...after all...they're both....errrr.....Swedish....

  10. #10

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    Quote by Composite View Post
    ah...but how does one tell a Finnish Swedish from a Lithuanian Swedish...after all...they're both....errrr.....Swedish....
    Hmm. That's a suprisingly good question but not in the most obvious sense. I have spent too much time grappling with this one myself. Here's what *I* think - The Finns were supplied with a quantity of Swedish M37 during the Winter War. These are obviously Swedish and have no specific Finnish characteristic. But the Finns rather liked the M37 and started production of a copy as the M40, famously made by Wartsila OY. Now, if you can tell the difference between an early M37 and a M40 at twenty paces you are a bettwe man than I. The only serious difference is that the Wartsila helmets have a little red sticker inside the crown of the helmet. Which is of course usually not there - these things had a long and hard life. The only other difference is that somewhere on the inside of the rim you will find a number - a size marking. If this is followed by a 'W' (ie 68W or something) then it is indubitably a Finnish-made product. The Swede has a similar size marking which does *not* include the letter 'W' and usually has a version of the Trekronor somewhere adjacent.

    It gets a bit more complicated when you move up into the later versions of the M37 or M40. You need three people and a block&tackle to deal with that.

    Later postscript - I remembered this is here - Finnish model 40
    Last edited by Greg Pickersgill; 08-16-2018 at 04:14 PM.

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