Become our sponsor and display your banner here
Results 1 to 7 of 7

American artist in French Foreign Legion

Article about: Here are a few pictures and illustrations by John Joseph "Jack" Casey (1878 - 1930) an American artist in the French Foreign Legion in WWI. Casey was a native of California, a news

  1. #1

    Default American artist in French Foreign Legion

    Here are a few pictures and illustrations by John Joseph "Jack" Casey (1878 - 1930) an American artist in the French Foreign Legion in WWI. Casey was a native of California, a newspaper illustrator and portrait artist. He is mentioned and photos appear in Paul Rockwell's book about Americans in the Legion. Any additional information is appreciated. Thank you.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Casey Portrait II.jpg 
Views:	1087 
Size:	107.0 KB 
ID:	117260   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	J.J. Casey Bob Scalon.jpg 
Views:	3792 
Size:	153.1 KB 
ID:	117261  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	J.J. Casey Denis Our Corporal.jpg 
Views:	601 
Size:	173.9 KB 
ID:	117262   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	J.J. Casey Ferdinand Capdievielle.jpg 
Views:	418 
Size:	124.0 KB 
ID:	117263  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	J.J. Casey Corvee de Potatos July.jpg 
Views:	424 
Size:	172.5 KB 
ID:	117264   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	J.J. Casey Small Portrait.jpg 
Views:	316 
Size:	22.5 KB 
ID:	117265  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	J.J. Casey Soldier.jpg 
Views:	905 
Size:	132.7 KB 
ID:	117266   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	JJ Casey Untitled 23.jpg 
Views:	1249 
Size:	139.4 KB 
ID:	117267  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	JJ Casey Untitled 11.jpg 
Views:	2947 
Size:	169.3 KB 
ID:	117268  

  2. #2

    Default Re: American artist in French Foreign Legion

    Very nice,are those in your collection.

  3. #3

    Default Re: American artist in French Foreign Legion

    To the young Americans with French sympathies who, at the beginning of the war, were eager to get into the real fighting as quickly as possible, the Foreign Legion offered the readiest means. Every able-bodied man who was willing to fight for France was welcomed as a brother to its ranks, whatever his nationality and without regard to his record. For scores of years the Legion had been famous, even notorious, as the refuge of soldiers of fortune, criminals, scapegraces and adventurers of all types---of all the outcasts of, society in fact. This unenviable reputation was no obstacle, however, in the way of the young Americans who were anxious to get into the fighting-lines by the easiest and quickest means possible. They were willing to take their chances.

    Edwin W. Morse. "In the Foreign Legion" in The Vanguard of American Volunteers. New York: Scribners, 1919.

  4. #4

    Default Re: American artist in French Foreign Legion

    The organization of the Legion during WWI is very tough to follow. At the beginning of the war the Legion was divided up into two "Foreign Regiments": the 1er Etrangère and 2eme Etrangère. These two Foreign Regiments each had three "Marching Regiments" which were broken down into battalions, companies, sections, and finally, squads.

    Most of the Americans who signed up in Paris in August 1914 were assigned to the Second Marching Regiment of the 2eme Etrangère. Many of the Americans who arrived later were assigned to the Third Marching Regiment (or others) of the 1er Etrangère.

    For example, in September 1914, Alan Seeger (who enlisted in Paris in August) was assigned to Battalion C (Second Marching Regiment) or the 2eme Etrangère. Whereas Edmond Genet, who enlisted in September 1915, was assigned to the Second Marching Regiment of the 1st Foreign Regiment (1er Etrangère).

    In the beginning the Legion did its best to try to create so-called "American Squads." But as the war continued and the Legion evolved, Americans (even those returning from the hospital) were basically sent to where they were needed most.

    Of the two, the 1er Etrangère saw the most action, and performed so amazingly in some of the bloodiest engagements of the war (Champagne, Navarin Farm) they were sent into action whenever the French Army needed the best to lead the attack. This meant they incurred the greatest losses and eventually the Marching Regiments within the 1er Etrangère were merged.

    On November 11th, 1915 the Marching Regiments of the 1er and 2eme Etrangères were merged into one Regiment, made up of three Battalions. And the 1er and 2eme Etrangères existed no longer as separate entities. For the rest of the war the Legion fought as a unified "Régiment de Marche de la Légion Etrangère" (aka RMLE). At this time all American members of the Legion were (finally) given the possibility to join the 170th line regiment of the French Infantry. Many left the Legion for the famous 170th, also known as the "Swallows of Death". Many other Americans (like Genet) began to leave the Legion to join what would become the Lafayette Escadrille. Alan Seeger, faithful to his Legion, remained.

    ~~ Rich McErlean

  5. #5
    Rich McErlean
    ?

    Default Re: American artist in French Foreign Legion

    MBarton did you buy Casey's sketch book? I was thinking about it at the time but passed on it. Very cool drawings of some of the hard core. I've been in contact with Cap's family, they would like to see that sketch, I'm sure. If you have more drawings please post them so we can ID them.

    Cheers,
    Rich

  6. #6

    Default Re: American artist in French Foreign Legion

    Quote by Rich McErlean View Post
    MBarton did you buy Casey's sketch book? I was thinking about it at the time but passed on it. Very cool drawings of some of the hard core. I've been in contact with Cap's family, they would like to see that sketch, I'm sure. If you have more drawings please post them so we can ID them.

    Cheers,
    Rich
    Where was it offered?

  7. #7
    Rich McErlean
    ?

    Default Re: American artist in French Foreign Legion


Similar Threads

  1. Waffen ss in the French Foreign Legion

    In History and Research Third Reich and WW2
    09-28-2013, 06:18 PM
  2. 07-28-2010, 03:15 PM
  3. The two trunk-uniform grouping of Lewis C. Gilger; American Field Service SSU 69

    In WW1 Allies: Great Britain, France, USA, etc 1914 - 1918
    05-21-2010, 04:35 AM
  4. 03-26-2010, 01:06 PM
  5. 12-06-2008, 02:12 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •