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Gallipoli 1915 medallion

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  1. #11
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    Gallipoli has special significance to Aussies and kiwis, and we remember our dead, as we were the nations the ANZACs came from....I'm sure it has the same significance to the Welsh, British, Indians, French, Turkish and even the Germans that were there....
    It's not a matter of us forgetting the others, we focus on our dead, because of the impact it had on us
    It's the same for every country, they tend to focus on the contribution of their own soldiers....if you listen to some british accounts, Bomber command consisted of only British airmen, I even saw a doco on the battles of El Alamein and Tobruk....you'd think the Britsh were the only ones there....normally Aussie and kiwis are lumped in under "the dominion troops", the Battle of Britain is often remembered as the Brits standing alone, the Polish might get a mention, but not usually anyone else....and it's not meant to be disrespectful, it depends on the audience its presented to...
    The above mentioned documentary of Tobruk, even had a small piece at the beggining stating, that this documentary was made for British audiences and does not portray the actions of the Australian 9th division....

    It depends on what affects you the most, what you can connect with....

    How many here know that there are 10 RAAF F/A 18's bombing ISIS targets as I type this, and Australian SAS are in Iraq now....I doubt not many, as it doesn't directly concern someone in the UK or the US..

    I don't mean to hijack this thread, just to put some members concerns into context
    ...

  2. #12
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    Fred Baker*- Commander, 28th Maori BattalionHarold Eric Barrowclough*- Commander, 3rd New Zealand DivisionSir Roderick Carr*- RAF Bomber Command and Chief of the*Indian Air Force*-*RAF Second Tactical Air Force*commanderBill Crawford-Crompton*- RAF Fighter aceJohn Evelyn Duigan*- Chief of General Staff, New Zealand Military Forces, from 1937 to 1941Baron Freyberg of Wellington*- Commander, 2NZEF and 2nd New Zealand Division. LaterGovernor-General of New ZealandColin Falkland Gray*- RAF Fighter aceAlfred Hulme*- awarded the Victoria CrossLindsay Merritt Inglis*- Senior officer who served with the 2NZEF in Greece, Crete, North Africa and ItalyEdgar James "Cobber" Kain*- RAF fighter ace (first pilot to win a DFC in World War II)Howard Karl "Kip" Kippenberger*- Commander, 2nd New Zealand DivisionOwen Mead*- Senior officer who served with the 2NZEFReginald Miles*- Senior officer who served with the 2NZEF in Greece and North AfricaSir Keith Park*-*No. 11 Group RAFcommander during the*Battle of Britain. Later commanded in Malta and Southeast AsiaGraham Beresford Parkinson*- Senior officer who served with the 2NZEF in Greece, North Africa and ItalyJohn Pattison (RNZAF officer)*- RAF Fighter pilotSir Peter Phipps*- founding Chief of Defence StaffEdward Puttick*- Senior officer who served with the 2NZEF in Greece and Crete. Later Chief of General Staff, New Zealand Military Forces, from 1941 to 1945*- Senior officer who served with the 2NZEFKeith Lindsay Stewart*- Senior officer who served with the 2NZEF in Greece, Crete and ItalyLeonard Trent*-*World War II*pilot,*Victoria Cross*recipientLloyd Alan Trigg*- World War II pilot, (only person awarded the VC solely on recommendation of the enemy)Charles Upham*- World War II soldier (one of three awarded the*Victoria Cross*twice but the only combat soldier to receive it twice)*- the most decorated servicewoman of World War IIJames Allen Ward*- VC winning sergeant pilot of*75 Squadron RNZAF*- Senior officer who served with the 2NZEF. Later Chief of General Staff, New Zealand Military Forces, from 1946 to 1949

    ir Keith Park*-*No. 11 Group RAFcommander during the*Battle of Britain. Later commanded in Malta and Southeast Asia

    - - ------- - -

    Just some kiwis who took leading roles during ww2.

  3. #13

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    Quote by Danger View Post
    Nice!
    I hope i can find some good stuff like that when im in turkey.
    303 bolt?
    Cheers, it's Turk Mauser GEW98 7.92mm, I have another Turk bolt from the same bag different type of rifle I'll have to take a pic of it! I have to add that these weren't ground dug but veteran bring backs. I took a look at the WW1 roll and was directed to the WW2 roll so I see he reenlisted for WW2!
    Regards
    René

  4. #14
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    Good on him.
    he would've been an interesting man to talk to.

  5. #15
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    About the ANZAC Commemorative Medallion

    This bronze medallion was instituted in 1967 for award to Australian and New Zealand personnel who participated in the Gallipoli campaign in 1915. The obverse design is circular, surmounted by St. Edward’s Crown. The main design on the obverse of the medallion depicts Simpson and his donkey carrying a wounded soldier, an iconic image of the ANZAC experience at Gallipoli. Below the main design is a wreath of gum leaves (Australian Eucalyptus), below which is a scroll bearing the word “ANZAC”. The circular portion of the reverse has a map of Australia and New Zealand with the Southern Cross. Beneath which is a wreath of fern leaves (representing New Zealand) and a blank scroll allowing for the inclusion of the recipient’s name. The medallion measures 76mm x 50mm, and is engraved on the reverse with the recipient’s initials and surname only. Because of insufficient space on the scroll, the rank and number had to be omitted.

    The medallion itself is not designed to be worn, however, those personnel who were still alive when the medallion was issued also received a lapel badge sized version of the full medallion, numbered on the reverse with the individual's First World War service number. Those who claimed the award on behalf of a deceased relative received only the medallion. The medallion was issued with a certificate. The text of the New Zealand and Australian versions of the certificate can be viewed here. The medallion is sometimes referred to as the Gallipoli Medallion.

  6. #16
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    I don't see these come up for sale very often but one just came up on trademe.co.nz Very cheap for now.
    If anyone out there wants one, here's your chance. this is for an Australian issue ANZAC Medal.
    I don't know the person selling and i get nothing from the sale.
    Many of these were never claimed.
    If you had a family member serve in Gallipoli I suggest you apply for it.

    otherwise go to -

    Australian WWI 1967 ANZAC medal | Trade Me

    An large Australian WWI ANZAC commemorative medal. Named to "R T EASON". Measures approx 75mm in length and weighs 120gms. Boxed and with certificate.

  7. #17
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    Listing #: 803665132

  8. #18
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    Very interesting Piece, I have never seen one before, I would love to have one.
    As for the campaign, the Newfoundland Regt was there ( Newfoundland was not a Province of Canada until 1949, so they were with the British)
    They Lost 40 Men there.
    The Newfound Regt was nearly whipped out on July 1 1916 at the Somme, while the rest of Canada has its "Canada Day" Newfoundland still mournes on that day.
    The Newfoundland Regt was the only Unit to receive the prefix Royal During WW1
    Also, there was a Canadian Field Hospital on an Island not far from there, The received the Wounded and sSck from The Battles, the Island is Now Greek and I cannot remember it's name, Several Canadians Died there including Canadian Nursing Sisters

    Not trying to Highjack the thread, just wanted to add so info

    Dean O
    Canada

  9. #19

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    great item, thanks for posting!

    on a side note, it's always nice to see a seller that states on their listings "We do not ship NZ military or historical medals overseas. Please provide an NZ address" its nice to think that some of these items can stay in their home countries.
    "They couldn't hit an elephant at this dist...."
    - Major-General John Sedgwick, 9 may 1864.
    Killed by a sniper during the battle of Spotsylvania..

  10. #20

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    Quote by CampX View Post
    there was a Canadian Field Hospital on an Island not far from there, The received the Wounded and sSck from The Battles, the Island is Now Greek and I cannot remember it's name, Several Canadians Died there including Canadian Nursing Sisters
    Dean O, was it the island Lemnos, you are thinking of?
    "They couldn't hit an elephant at this dist...."
    - Major-General John Sedgwick, 9 may 1864.
    Killed by a sniper during the battle of Spotsylvania..

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